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Pediatric Residency Programs Overview

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biologicwidth

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Sweet!! So what's your story??((I ask the same thing of all the residents & current pediatric dentists I meet))...did you practice before going back to residency, what was your application process like (#of schools you applied to & got interviews) and why did you decide on pediatrics?? Thx:))
I came straight out of dental school, applied to 15 schools, interviewed at 8, and I think I ended up ranking all but 1...lol it's been awhile :) I'll PM you the rest of the story when I get a chance! Anyone else reading this is free to PM me for any other questions as well!
 

spark0722

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Can anyone shed light on the pediatric dentistry program at University of Illinois at Chicago? Thanks!
 

shaggy22

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University of Connecticut/ Connecticut Children's Medical Center

General Info
-2 year paid ($48000 year one/$50,000 year two if US resident) hybrid hospital/university based program
-5 Residents per year
-Program director is part time
-Residents split time between 3 clinics (one at Connecticut Children's Medical Center and two community clinics)
Only residency without a clinic at UConn Dental...residents kinda alienated
-Formal coursework done on opposite side of town at dental school
-15 days vacation per year (do not roll over)
-10 sick days split amongst 2 years

OR Experience:
-In second year residents spend 3 months one day a week, 2 cases per day in OR. Cases are split with a first year resident
-Most residents average 23-30 cases as chief during residency (just above the minimum of 21)

Sedation experience:
-Midazolam (oral/intranasal) +/- N2O or Valium and Vistaril +/- N2O
-IV Sedation performed by sedation team
-Most residents graduate with 25-30 oral/intranasal sedations as operator and 50 as monitors
-100-200 N2O cases per resident

Ortho experience:
One pediatric dentist who does ortho in his practice teaches ortho didactics and overseas cases in clinic 1-3 days per month.
Limited cases. Residents lucky to have completed two interceptive cases by end of residency
Good treatment planning and didactics, just very little and experience

Call:
-Taken at home if live within 30 minutes of hospital
-Approximately 8-11 weeks per year during first year
-Holidays are divided among PGY-1
-Day call residents provide second after hours call 8-11 weeks during year 1 (this is an informal agreement between PGY1 and PGY2 residents)
-PGY-2 provides "third" call two months during 2nd year
-Very good trauma experience
-Emergency room staff offers ketamine sedation for on call treatment if needed

Research:
-Program requires residents to complete a research paper, presentation, and project during second year.
-Residents encouraged presenting to AAPD (travel and lodging somewhat supported by program)
-Advisor may or may not help with project
-IRB process is long and drawn out
-Some research time is sporadically set aside

Rotations:
-Anesthesia 4 weeks
-Pediatric Medicine 2 weeks
-Emergency Medicine 2 weeks
-Teaching 2 months (1-3 days per week) with dental students at outside clinic

Academic Experience:
-Instruction is provided though lectures, seminars & courses (and most formal courses at the dental school have much to be desired) mostly in first year
-Residents provide most of the lectures
-Pediatric Dentistry-Orthodontic seminars monthly
-Depending on director's motivation a residency class may or may not have review for boards...most of material is self-taught...vacation time must be taken if desire a "day to study"

Clinical Experience:
-7 patients per day
-80% prophies or no shows
-20% restorative (mostly sealants and PRRs)
-Lots of experience with special needs and medically compromised patients
-Several patients each week require active and/or passive restraint

Overall:
Good for someone simply looking for a certificate or looking to manage special needs patients.
 

niles19

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THX for the info....VERY valuable & I appreciate it!!
 

ElectraOnAzalea

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Anymore recents grads or current residents want to add your program?? :)
 

fountainhead206

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Here's the low down on Yale's pediatric dental residency :)


General Background:
Hybrid program with a strong academic and hospital presence. It’s affiliated with the Yale New Haven Hospital, which is world famous for the research, technology, and innovations in all medical specialties. It’s also affiliated with the Yale School of Medicine. So essentially, you are a Yale Medical Resident under the subdivision of dental medicine.

You have access to the entire Yale campus with your Yale ID and access to all parts of the YNN Hospital with your hospital ID. We are in our own private clinic (separate from the hospital) all 5 days and seeing patients from 8:30-4:30 (unless you are on rotation or in the OR). You see roughly 2 pts/hr except for oral or IV sedations, which are longer. The program director is INCREDIBLE and very approachable. She makes sure we are always learning and on the right track. She is also one of the few and elite oral pathologists/pediatric dentists in the country

The assistants are the BEST! They’ve been here a long time and really know how to handle the sticky situations with kids. Speaking of assistants, you always have one!
Continuity of care is something that makes our program unique. We make it a point to do that (unless the resident requests not to get that kid again lol). Most [busy] programs don’t have continuity of care so every time the pt/parent comes in, they have a different resident. There are 10 operatories. Everyone has their own operatory and assistant. There are 12 residents but 1 or 2 are always gone on rotation, OR, craniofacial, hematology/onc, etc. We have 2 full time hygienists as well

OR experience:

OR days are 3 times per week. Each time, a 1st and 2nd year go with an attending. I would approximate that we all go ~3 times per month, which is roughly 1/wk.

Sedations

We do oral sedations on Tuesday and Thursday mornings in our sedation rooms. On Tuesday and Wednesdays, OMS comes and we do our IV sedations then. Great sedation experience

Ortho experience

We have an ortho lecture every Friday morning from 8-9 and we see our ortho pts on Thurs and Fri mornings. We have several orthodontic attendings that come in and teach us. We pretty much have the leeway of doing as much or as little ortho as you want. We focus mainly on interceptive ortho unless you want to do full bond-bracket which if you are into that kind of thing, those are done on Mondays with a certain attending, ie. if you want to learn comprehensive permanent dentition ortho, Mondays are the day you can do them.

Call schedule:

We’re on call for a whole week every 6 weeks. First years get first call and second years are on second call. The second years will go in for every call with you for the first several months. After that, 1st years take the first call and will only call 2nd years as needed. The call load is hit or miss. Sometimes you can get called heavily, other times, you have lots of time to relax. It’s not a heavy/obnoxious call load in my opinion but enough to get you comfortable with taking emergencies when out in practice.

Research:

Research is sort of a big deal but you can usually just do a simple topic as long as it’s relevant and important to peds. It’s a requirement but most people get the bulk of it done second year. You get a half day off once a month during the work week to work on it but you can use that day as a personal day if needed.

Rotations:

anesthesia is one month, peds medicine is a month, craniofacial is every 6th Monday , Pediatric primary care clinic is every 6th Friday. Hematology/oncology and DART (child abuse awareness ) rotation is 2nd year. You also have a 2-week optional rotation in oral surgery if you want to improve in permanent teeth extractions.

Academic classes

During first year, we have lecture on Tuesday and Thursday morning from 7:30-8:30am. 1 or 2 times a month, we have lecture with oral surgery and GPR on Wednesday mornings. We have journal club once a month too. Fridays are ortho days so we have ortho lecture that morning. BEST PART= NO EXAMS!!! We have small quizzes after each lecture but it’s just to make sure we’re learning and paying attention.

2nd year, we have board's review lectures. And 2nd years teach the pedo review course for the first years in July/August. We are out everyday by 4:30 or 5pm and you are DONE for the day, no lingering paperwork, no computer stuff, no cleaning, no nothing. You have the rest of the day for fun, relaxation, whatever. Weekends are free too. You can say goodbye to any more intense studying etc. when you get here :) of course, it is expected that you keep up with lecture material and learn


This clinic is a state of the art new clinic with a cephalometric machine, Cone beam CT, and pano which makes it super easy on our pts. We have separate rooms and operatories with doors (not open bay) and 2 fully equipped sedation rooms for IV and oral sedation. We also have a recovery room. We have an in-house nurse practitioner that does all of our H&P’s for our General anesthesia pts and can monitor for our sedations. We are part of the Craniofacial team with plastics and ENT, which are downstairs --makes it super convenient and a great resource for pts with deformities, birth defects, etc. Team/Comprehensive tx is a big deal here esp since we work closely OMS, GPR, plastic surgery, ENT, etc. The chair of our department is a board certified oral surgeon AND plastic surgeon along with our awesome program director being both a board certified pediatric dentist AND oral pathologist!


Stipend: is $62,000 and it goes up every year.
Definitely a huge plus. We also get full benefits for medical, disability, etc. they also match a percentage of your paycheck and put it into a retirement fund which is awesome. And there’s NO TUITION!

The best thing of all is that the residents and attendings are very cohesive. We help each other out so much, its incredible. Plus it doesn’t hurt to have the Yale name on your degree.


New Haven is a quirky college town well known for the best pizza and amazing seafood. There’s an area of great bars and restaurants that are full of Yale grad students. It’s a very transient young professional town full of medical residents, grad students, and law students. Pleasantly surprised on how nice it is here and how much fun it is!
This information i
 

fountainhead206

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The info regarding the Yale Hew Haven Hospital is outdated/ inaccurate/falsified and is clearly written by individuals who are desperate to recruit high quality applicants:yuck: The PDR/ GPR/ OMS residencies are run by an administrative mob and lack the core set of full-time faculty (which left earlier this year), the place is the epitome of resident exploitation and does not foster learning or scientific acquisition (in fact the program director for ped dent is known for :slap: residents and making them :cryi:). There is minimal resident supervision or teaching and therefore there are a number of adverse events with patient care :vomit:. To be honest the place does not have enough rooms to accommodate for the 12 residents listed and therefore residents do not get enough experience with ortho, sedation, etc. :uhno: My understanding is that the classes are a good time to sleep :yawn: and are average at best. Everyone I know is aware of the dissatisfaction at that program, talk to the program director/chair at your school to avoid wasting time an money:thinking::nono::stop:
 

athrought

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thx for the info fountainhead! how do you know this about yale? i've heard really good things from a bunch of people. are you a current resident? what program are you in?
 

biologicwidth

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The info regarding the Yale Hew Haven Hospital is outdated/ inaccurate/falsified and is clearly written by individuals who are desperate to recruit high quality applicants:yuck: The PDR/ GPR/ OMS residencies are run by an administrative mob and lack the core set of full-time faculty (which left earlier this year), the place is the epitome of resident exploitation and does not foster learning or scientific acquisition (in fact the program director for ped dent is known for :slap: residents and making them :cryi:). There is minimal resident supervision or teaching and therefore there are a number of adverse events with patient care :vomit:. To be honest the place does not have enough rooms to accommodate for the 12 residents listed and therefore residents do not get enough experience with ortho, sedation, etc. :uhno: My understanding is that the classes are a good time to sleep :yawn: and are average at best. Everyone I know is aware of the dissatisfaction at that program, talk to the program director/chair at your school to avoid wasting time an money:thinking::nono::stop:


This post was clearly written by a disgruntled person that is not a part of the Yale pedi residency. We are all very proud of our program and would encourage you to come see it to form your own thoughts. Furthermore, the detailed overview written on the last page about Yale pedi was written by the residents and is the most current and up-to-date information
 
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xkc9126x

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Does anyone know if GPR residency is needed for NY Pediatric Dentistry programs?
 

kvd6718

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University of Connecticut/ Connecticut Children's Medical Center

General Info
-2 year paid ($48000 year one/$50,000 year two if US resident) hybrid hospital/university based program
-5 Residents per year
-Program director is part time
-Residents split time between 3 clinics (one at Connecticut Children's Medical Center and two community clinics)
Only residency without a clinic at UConn Dental...residents kinda alienated
-Formal coursework done on opposite side of town at dental school
-15 days vacation per year (do not roll over)
-10 sick days split amongst 2 years

OR Experience:
-In second year residents spend 3 months one day a week, 2 cases per day in OR. Cases are split with a first year resident
-Most residents average 23-30 cases as chief during residency (just above the minimum of 21)

Sedation experience:
-Midazolam (oral/intranasal) +/- N2O or Valium and Vistaril +/- N2O
-IV Sedation performed by sedation team
-Most residents graduate with 25-30 oral/intranasal sedations as operator and 50 as monitors
-100-200 N2O cases per resident

Ortho experience:
One pediatric dentist who does ortho in his practice teaches ortho didactics and overseas cases in clinic 1-3 days per month.
Limited cases. Residents lucky to have completed two interceptive cases by end of residency
Good treatment planning and didactics, just very little and experience

Call:
-Taken at home if live within 30 minutes of hospital
-Approximately 8-11 weeks per year during first year
-Holidays are divided among PGY-1
-Day call residents provide second after hours call 8-11 weeks during year 1 (this is an informal agreement between PGY1 and PGY2 residents)
-PGY-2 provides "third" call two months during 2nd year
-Very good trauma experience
-Emergency room staff offers ketamine sedation for on call treatment if needed

Research:
-Program requires residents to complete a research paper, presentation, and project during second year.
-Residents encouraged presenting to AAPD (travel and lodging somewhat supported by program)
-Advisor may or may not help with project
-IRB process is long and drawn out
-Some research time is sporadically set aside

Rotations:
-Anesthesia 4 weeks
-Pediatric Medicine 2 weeks
-Emergency Medicine 2 weeks
-Teaching 2 months (1-3 days per week) with dental students at outside clinic

Academic Experience:
-Instruction is provided though lectures, seminars & courses (and most formal courses at the dental school have much to be desired) mostly in first year
-Residents provide most of the lectures
-Pediatric Dentistry-Orthodontic seminars monthly
-Depending on director's motivation a residency class may or may not have review for boards...most of material is self-taught...vacation time must be taken if desire a "day to study"

Clinical Experience:
-7 patients per day
-80% prophies or no shows
-20% restorative (mostly sealants and PRRs)
-Lots of experience with special needs and medically compromised patients
-Several patients each week require active and/or passive restraint

Overall:
Good for someone simply looking for a certificate or looking to manage special needs patients.



I am currently a second year resident about to graduate, and while much of this is accurate, I wanted to add comments on a few things about UConn Pediatric Dental Residency:

In terms of clinical experience I definitely feel well-prepared. A couple years ago, the program added a new satellite clinic 15 minutes from the main hospital which was slow to get going the first year, but is now SO BUSY and we usually have all day complex restorative. So the program has PLENTY of operative. I am comfortable with crowns, pulpotomies, fillings, strip crowns, etc. We still do some recalls, but it is usually at the hospital where we have mostly pretty young or medically-complex/special needs kids. Getting comfortable with these complex cases has been a huge boon to my pediatric dental education, and I have learned how to effectively coordinate/communicate with other specialities to provide care for these little ones! And the no-sow rate is common wherever you have a Medicaid population, but I have not found it to be a huge problem. My future employer was nothing but impressed by my education and experience.

From what I have heard, the ortho program we have is much stronger than you will get at other places. We have many otho didactic sessions, seminars with the orthodontic residents, we learn how/are required to take records and use Dolphin (ortho software). Yes, I have only handled personally 3 interceptive cases, but with this I have become more comfortable banding/bracketing on my own. I have used facemasks, utility wires, and been involved in problem solving tricky cases. When applying for jobs this year, I know many employers were very excited to hear that I had this much experience.

We do have many formal classes (microbiology, growth and development etc), but I have enjoyed the fact that another large part of our education has been self-guided. Certain days of the week, a resident or two will be responsible for researching and presenting a topic. This gave us a chance to provide input on what we wanted to learn more about and use current evidence based evidence and the most recent research articles. And this year, my classmates organized a board review after work for ourselves with materials provided to us by previous residents. I felt like our education was strong enough without SPECIFIC board review classes to pass boards no problem. I have never heard of a past resident who did not pass.

The reason I chose the residency in the first place was because I wanted a strong education first off. But also important to me was a supportive and inviting atmosphere. The attendings push you but at the same time are so approachable. Everyone wants you to do well, and I felt attendings felt it not only important to teach the dentistry but to mentor us on real life issues. I had copious help finding and deciding on a job. They care about us outside of the residency as well. I love it here! If you have any further questions at all please dont hesitate to message me :)
 
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AA.ML

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What school is this?



I guess I will do my program. I will try and be as neutral as possible but I think everyone is a little biased about their programs.

General backgroud info
Currently University based program. However, we will be moving to Amplantz Children's Hopsital (Just opened in May of this year) sometime next year. One of my attendings just spoke with the contractors and they are telling him April of 2012. The move will be a very big positive for the program. Bigger stipend (likely equal to medical residents) and the new clinic will be need to be run for a profit. Thus, should be run much more like private practice. However, it will be similar to starting a practice from scratch, so the first few months will be slow. Contractors are never on time. Thus, I would think it would be more likely to move July 2012 but who knows for sure.

OR Experience
Go to Hospital two days a weeks (avg 2 to 3 cases per day) and to be honest we need more time. As you will all soon find out the hospital is political. However, hopefully this increases once the program moves to a full time based hospital program. We also do OR cases at two other rotations, so you get more exposure at different hospitals. I think my chief said he will have over 80 cases this year.

Sedation experience
Exposure to all classic oral sedation meds. Chloral Hydrate, Demerol, Hydroxyzine, Versed, Valium, Halcion, etc. Also do intranasal sedation with versed. Residents are currently graduating with approx 25 cases. However, we recently have hired two new part time faculty thus our sedation days will increase. Hopefully, this will increase our number.

Ortho experience
The program just started a relationship this year with the head of the ortho department. We have seminars and then do treatment on Monday mornings. These are primarily phase 1 cases or full mouth cases that can be completed before you leave the program. We also have two pediatric dentists whom each come twice per month that do some ortho with us. I feel we get a taste of ortho in our program and it will be up to you if you would like to continue doing it after your residency. However, I think you will want to take some CE courses.

On call
We each take call for an entire week (10 to 11 weeks total). Call starts Christmas of yr 1 and goes until Christmas of year 2. Its at home call. We just started taking call at the new children's hospital when it opened and this has increase the amount of times we go in. However, I would say during a week of call generally you will get page several times but will have to only go in once. I don't believe anyone has had to go in twice, but we just started taking call there May 1st of this year.

Research
Program really encourages us to complete paper quality research projects. Surveys are looked down up (not good research) and case reports are frowned upon. We get half a day each week dedicated to research when you are not on rotation. Faculty are very helpful in guiding you with your research project.

Rotations
We have a lot of rotations. In general your first year you are on rotation 40% of the time and this increases to 50% of the the time during your second year. These rotations are anything from emergency room, anesthesia, to practice pediatric dentistry in other clinics. Mondays are the in house day (due ortho in the morning) and then in the afternoon its case presentations and seminar (literature).

Academic classes
We do take academic courses where you have finals and assignments. Some of the more intensive classes are advanced head and neck anatomy, biostats, history and physical, etc. I think this may change (less classes) once we move to new hospital. You don't get full GME funding unless you work not take classes. But this is not my call.

I think that pretty much hits most of things you guys would have questions on. I really think all of the programs have strong points and weaker points. However, your training will be basically what you put into to it. Thus, apply to places you (especially the better half if you have one) wouldn't mind living for 2-3 years and try find a place where you think you fit in. Good luck to everyone. I know its a crazy time. PM me if you have more questions.
 

Franklin3

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Does anyone have advice on UCLA's pedo program? Pros / cons? Thank you!
 
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ToothFairy72006

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does anyone have advice about mt sinai pediatric residency program in harlem? lack of conscious sedation training?
 
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