Cowboy DO

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You think it's the kiss of death if I were to mention that I want to start a family in my PS. I have a little closing paragraph about my future goals...fellowship, academics, etc. and also mention that starting a family might be nice.

I feel like it adds a personal touch, something my PS is lacking in, then I realized it might not be such a hot idea.

Thoughts?

Thanks,
CB
 

sepsis

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Cowboy DO said:
You think it's the kiss of death if I were to mention that I want to start a family in my PS. I have a little closing paragraph about my future goals...fellowship, academics, etc. and also mention that starting a family might be nice.

I feel like it adds a personal touch, something my PS is lacking in, then I realized it might not be such a hot idea.
Thoughts?
Thanks,
CB
since it's sthg the pd's are not allowed to ask about in the first place, i wouldn't put it in there. it's also irrelevant to your ability to perform well in that residency. if you are female - i'd say for certain don't bring it up.
i'd say no in general.
 
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Bevo

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I'd say keep it out.

A. It might be assumed to be a given statement
B. It might hurt your application if they know ahead of time that you won't be 100% for the duration of the residency. i.e. that you might need a significant amount of time off. Its one thing if you start a family while in a residency, its another to proclaim you will be before getting attached to a program.

Future plans I think are more specific to where you wanna go with your career. Not how many kids, dogs, etc you plan to have or want.

I say keep it professional and don't mention it. Its one of those issues that keep you from getting an interview or matching. Why risk it.
 

scully

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To play devil's advocate, I would say to keep it in. It is well known that employers like employees with families, as they are seen as more responsible, grounded, and stable. I don't think that a person who says they are starting a family would be thought of as potentially giving less effort than someone who gets into Rads and spends all their free time at the beach (or even moonlighting for that matter.)

In addition, I have heard from friends that at alot of schools, many of the residents are married and look for the same.

I don't think it would hurt to be honest, and it might actually help.
 

sepsis

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scully said:
To play devil's advocate, I would say to keep it in. It is well known that employers like employees with families, as they are seen as more responsible, grounded, and stable. I don't think that a person who says they are starting a family would be thought of as potentially giving less effort than someone who gets into Rads and spends all their free time at the beach (or even moonlighting for that matter.)

In addition, I have heard from friends that at alot of schools, many of the residents are married and look for the same.

I don't think it would hurt to be honest, and it might actually help.
while what you say may indeed be true it is a big assumption - not all programs may think along these lines and it may be a risk not worth taking.

Also, a family does not automatically make a person more responsible, grounded, or stable. Many times it may mean that a person has to leave for 'family emergencies' or stay home when a family member is sick.

to be the devils' devils' advocate ;)
 

Bevo

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On the other hand... to be the devils' devils' devils' advocate.

cheese owns.

Honestly, arguments for both. Which is safer?
 

bigfrank

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A Personal Statement is successful if it stands out in no way at all. Just keep it simple and short, and you'll be fine. I think the mention of a family is perfectly reasonable.
 

cliffhanger

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You should put yourself in the shoes of a program director and think... if you were reading hundreds of these statements, would you actually keep a mental checklist of people who do or don't have families, so that you can rank them accordingly? Would you really care? This is not the kind of minutia that PDs worry about. It is assumed that nearly everyone will be having a family... why should they care if you're honest about it or not? Believe it or not, PDs aren't stupider than we are. And this isn't surgery where attitudes against women are still pervasive... and if it was, why is there a common presumption that being a female radiology applicant is an advantage? Gimme a break. The question you should be asking yourself... Does including a statement about future plans (or anything else for that matter) make my personal statement stonger or not? Does it make more interesting reading? Does it give the reader more insight about my character? If it doesn't do these things, chuck it. Otherwise...
 

YupGypsy

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bigfrank said:
A Personal Statement is successful if it stands out in no way at all. Just keep it simple and short, and you'll be fine. I think the mention of a family is perfectly reasonable.

Dang, my medical school PS really stands out. I thought setting myself from other applicants is a good thing. Why would it be bad?
 

Wallachia

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scully said:
To play devil's advocate, I would say to keep it in. It is well known that employers like employees with families, as they are seen as more responsible, grounded, and stable. I don't think that a person who says they are starting a family would be thought of as potentially giving less effort than someone who gets into Rads and spends all their free time at the beach (or even moonlighting for that matter.)

In addition, I have heard from friends that at alot of schools, many of the residents are married and look for the same.

I don't think it would hurt to be honest, and it might actually help.
we are not talking about regular employers; you are going to be working 80 hrs per week and we would like nothing to interfere with that process; as Big Frank stated, at this point in the game, not sticking out is good; additionally, as another poster had indicated any married female is already assumed to be starting family . . . no need to declare it
 

f_w

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'I am planning to start a family during residency' ----> |||PDs brain||| ---> 'You can look forward to an endless whine from the other residents about the extra call they will have to take while I am unavailable'


(keep it out)
 

Docmike2006

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This information will likely not help you, but it can hurt you. And PDs read very carefully into what you write, and they WILL make a note of your family plans and interpret it as they see fit.
 

jj2134

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I think the question is whether what you say is interesting or not. If you got interesting stuff to say rather than just communicating you want to start a family, I would keep it.

Seriously, who gives a sh** if you add someone to the program that is married and will start a family in residency. If you are female as everyone has assumed, I'd say being female is no disadvantage in matching to the place you want to go, probably an ever so slight advantage. There is no question everyone is already aware and has "factored in" the liklihood that a married applicant will start a family in residency if they haven't already. Still, no bias seems to exist.

If I were a PD or resident with imput on the situation, I'd be more worried about an applicant who stated the opposite. Stating nothing is safe... but I'd rather be interesting than safe.
 
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