Mar 16, 2010
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I am curious, how many people would agree that a PhD is a research degree? Would it make sense to get a PhD if all you want to do is counseling?

I know about the scientist-practitioner model, and how science influences practice and vice versa. How many people believe that you truly need to be well-versed in conducting research to become an effective counselor?
 

erg923

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This has been debated extensively in various threads on here. Most Ph.Ds in clinical psych will have primarily clinically oriented careers, so no, its certainly not a pure "research degree." In short, you will find a mix of opinions. Many will argue that the "think like a scientist" attitude/mindset hammered home in Ph.D and quality Psy.D programs enables one to become a better informed clinician. Is it necessary for one to know the in and outs of R01 grant writing and managing a large research lab to be a good therapist?....I don't think so, no.
 
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Jan 29, 2010
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I am curious, how many people would agree that a PhD is a research degree? Would it make sense to get a PhD if all you want to do is counseling?

I know about the scientist-practitioner model, and how science influences practice and vice versa. How many people believe that you truly need to be well-versed in conducting research to become an effective counselor?
Why is your subject "PhD vs. MA?" (Not a rhetorical question). It seems like the content of your post is really about PhD or PsyD, but are you considering getting a terminal Masters? A terminal MA/MS has a lot more limitations than a PhD or a PsyD in terms of where/how they practice, career opportunities, etc.
 
Mar 16, 2010
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Why is your subject "PhD vs. MA?" (Not a rhetorical question). It seems like the content of your post is really about PhD or PsyD, but are you considering getting a terminal Masters? A terminal MA/MS has a lot more limitations than a PhD or a PsyD in terms of where/how they practice, career opportunities, etc.
I am debating between a PhD and terminal Masters. I don't want to get a PsyD because of all the debt.
 
Mar 16, 2010
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This has been debated extensively in various threads on here. Most Ph.Ds in clinical psych will have primarily clinically oriented careers, so no, its certainly not a pure "research degree." In short, you will find a mix of opinions. Many will argue that the "think like a scientist" attitude/mindset hammered home in Ph.D and quality Psy.D programs enables one to become a better informed clinician. Is it necessary for one to know the in and outs of R01 grant writing and managing a large research lab to be a good therapist?....I don't think so, no.
Thank you for your response, I'll try to find the old treads :)

The part of your post that I put in bold is exactly what I was thinking.
 

AcronymAllergy

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As erg said, many individuals with Ph.D.'s typically go on to primarily clinician-focused roles (after all, there are only so many professorships and research coordinator roles to go around).

However, keep in mind that being a good clinician is very similar to being a good researcher--your skills for appropriately digesting and interpreting empirical data, case formulation, hypothesis testing, and assessment of intervention effectiveness are constantly in use when working with clients, much as they would be when conducting a clinical study.
 

Therapist4Chnge

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This has been debated extensively in various threads on here. Most Ph.Ds in clinical psych will have primarily clinically oriented careers, so no, its certainly not a pure "research degree." In short, you will find a mix of opinions. Many will argue that the "think like a scientist" attitude/mindset hammered home in Ph.D and quality Psy.D programs enables one to become a better informed clinician. Is it necessary for one to know the in and outs of R01 grant writing and managing a large research lab to be a good therapist?....I don't think so, no.
Good post.

(I wish I could find a recent post I wrote on this topic, because it fits well here...but I'll try and paraphrase).

When I was going through graduate school, I didn't realize how how important "thinking like a scientist" was in every day clinical work. The training can really make you stand out among other professionals because the way you view a situation and formulate solutions are often quite different.

I regularly see psychologists in our department implement programs and solutions all over the hospital. This kind of thinking can provide another dimension to what you can bring to a facility, and ultimately it can get you into top positions.

In regard to therapy....I think it has better informed my intervention choices. We use EBTs every day, and while I am not looking for a therapy-based career, I believe having the research training and making it part of everything I do has made me a better clinician.