leviathan

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Hey, all.

I never studied Physics in high-school, and so I'm going to have to start fresh in University for these courses. There are introductory courses and I'm wondering if you can tell me from the description of these, if they will satisfy what I need to know for the MCAT:


Phys 100: Introductory Physics:
An introduction to fundamental concepts such as force, energy, momentum, and the use of graphs and vectors in physics; geometrical optics; electricity; laboratory exercises to familiarize the student with both the phenomena and the basic laboratory instruments commonly used to measure them.

PHYS 101: Energy and Waves

Conservation laws, rotational motion, simple harmonic motion, sound, fluids, heat, including biological applications.


Does that sound like I would learn enough? Or what other aspects of physics must I know?

Thank you VERY much for the help. :)
 

flighterdoc

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leviathan said:
Hey, all.

I never studied Physics in high-school, and so I'm going to have to start fresh in University for these courses. There are introductory courses and I'm wondering if you can tell me from the description of these, if they will satisfy what I need to know for the MCAT:


Phys 100: Introductory Physics:
An introduction to fundamental concepts such as force, energy, momentum, and the use of graphs and vectors in physics; geometrical optics; electricity; laboratory exercises to familiarize the student with both the phenomena and the basic laboratory instruments commonly used to measure them.

PHYS 101: Energy and Waves

Conservation laws, rotational motion, simple harmonic motion, sound, fluids, heat, including biological applications.


Does that sound like I would learn enough? Or what other aspects of physics must I know?

Thank you VERY much for the help. :)

You're going to have to take a full year (2 semesters or 3 quarters) of physics anyway, you might as well take the 101 class that is part of that. The 100 class sounds like a physics for non-science types so that the liberal arts folks can get a science class (sparks for jocks?)

There are three main areas of classical physics, optics/light, sound, and motion/gravity/magnetism. The MCAT may have questions on any or all of them.
 

exmike

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It has been from my experience and others that physics is the one section of the MCAT that you can get by through prep courses w/o taking it. Dont worry about which one will prep you better, take the one that fills your prerequsites and that is easier to get an A in. Just my opinion.
 
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leviathan

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flighterdoc said:
You're going to have to take a full year (2 semesters or 3 quarters) of physics anyway, you might as well take the 101 class that is part of that. The 100 class sounds like a physics for non-science types so that the liberal arts folks can get a science class (sparks for jocks?)

There are three main areas of classical physics, optics/light, sound, and motion/gravity/magnetism. The MCAT may have questions on any or all of them.
Alright, I didn't quite understand your answer. These are the two classes I plan to take, providing they are sufficient for the MCAT. You are suggesting I take the 101 class, but does that coupled with the 100 class satisfy the knowledge requirement? Or should I be taking a 3rd class?
 

late inthe game

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Yep, I'm one of those who hadn't taken a whole year of physics before the MCAT. I just took advantage of my prep class materials, and did just fine. The downside of taking physics after the MCAT: if you do real well on the MCAT it feels remarkably futile to have to take physics after you've clearly proven that you're capable of understanding basic physics.


exmike said:
It has been from my experience and others that physics is the one section of the MCAT that you can get by through prep courses w/o taking it. Dont worry about which one will prep you better, take the one that fills your prerequsites and that is easier to get an A in. Just my opinion.
 

leviathan

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late inthe game said:
Yep, I'm one of those who hadn't taken a whole year of physics before the MCAT. I just took advantage of my prep class materials, and did just fine. The downside of taking physics after the MCAT: if you do real well on the MCAT it feels remarkably futile to have to take physics after you've clearly proven that you're capable of understanding basic physics.
Nice...OK, so for you who have taken the MCAT and excelled in Physical Sciences solely from your prep work, had you taken High School physics before? I haven't had any, except for about a month of basic physics wayy back in grade 10 in the general science class you take at that age.
 

An Yong

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leviathan said:
Hey, all.

I never studied Physics in high-school, and so I'm going to have to start fresh in University for these courses. There are introductory courses and I'm wondering if you can tell me from the description of these, if they will satisfy what I need to know for the MCAT:


Phys 100: Introductory Physics:
An introduction to fundamental concepts such as force, energy, momentum, and the use of graphs and vectors in physics; geometrical optics; electricity; laboratory exercises to familiarize the student with both the phenomena and the basic laboratory instruments commonly used to measure them.

PHYS 101: Energy and Waves

Conservation laws, rotational motion, simple harmonic motion, sound, fluids, heat, including biological applications.


Does that sound like I would learn enough? Or what other aspects of physics must I know?

Thank you VERY much for the help. :)
Looks about right, but I didn't see magnatism... but that might be included in the electricity portion in phys 100. Anyways, you can go to www.aamc.org to get a topic list of whats on the MCAT.
 

Nuel

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To the OP, makesure you learn your physics very well.

I just returned from the MCAT land. 8 physics passages and 3 on chem--form DK. I mean, I will arrogantly say PS was my very strength, even the Kap type with rigorous computations, but I think I choked Saturday.

That's all I have to say. WIll probably face this beast come August for the second and last time.

Good luck mate.
 

HollyJ

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Looks good to me. As exmike and others have said, physics on the MCAT is pretty basic, so don't stress yourself out over it. Good luck!
 
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