Picking College for Pre-Med

Discussion in 'hSDN' started by Pediatrician1971, Aug 12, 2017.

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  1. Pediatrician1971

    Pediatrician1971

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    Dec 5, 2016
    So I just recently moved to Arkansas, from Texas and found myself in a depressing situation. I am currently in high school, and still deciding what college to go to. In Texas, I am probably going to find myself paying 4x the college cost to go to a decent college (University of Houston) or I could go to state school over here for alot cheaper of a price (University of Arkansas). So here is the dilemna, Arkansas only has one medical school, which includes pharmacy and nursing. Meanwhile, in Texas there is alot more medical school as well as dental and programs like JAMP. Both school accept 90% instate students. My family is currently in a tough finicial position and I have 2 years left to decide where to go. I know it is too early to decide whether I am even going to do Pre-Med, but it is my current mind-set. Anybody have any advices?
     
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  3. blackroses

    blackroses 2+ Year Member

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    Apr 23, 2014
    Honestly, the best decision I made was to go to a cheap Directional State school. I graduated with no debt. I can't even begin to explain how big of a weight off my shoulders that was. I also had the advantage of having small class sizes. There were of course a few downsides, but when it comes down to it, nothing even comes close to outweighing the low cost.

    Tl;dr I would highly recommend attending the cheapest institution you can. That way if you end up taking a gap year(s), needing to take some time off between graduation and finding employment to study for the MCAT, etc... you don't have the weight of an obscene amount of student loans bearing down on you. There are plenty of private medical schools at all levels that you'll be able to apply to when that time comes - or, if you change your mind about medical school, you won't be getting crushed under your student loans.
     
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  4. Winged Scapula

    Winged Scapula Cougariffic! Staff Member Lifetime Donor SDN Chief Administrator 10+ Year Member

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  5. Princeton Medical Student

    Princeton Medical Student

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    Jul 4, 2016
    My advice will be to attend a school near a major population center. This makes finding activities significantly easier.
     
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  6. Pediatrician1971

    Pediatrician1971

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    Dec 5, 2016
    Will do! I found University of Arkansas relatively cheap. Tuition is around 5000, not including any other fee of course. Campus is quite large, but mostly revolves around sports rather then education (just like any other state school) despite a few prestigious one. The fact that there is only one in-state medical school is quite intimidating, as there is more competition focus on one area. I am gonna see if SDN has some threads from U of A pre-meds to get some insight. Appreciate your word of wisdom.
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2017
  7. glycoprotein1

    glycoprotein1

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    Sep 28, 2016
    I'm a current student at the U of A (and going through the app cycle right now if it makes a difference). The campus is large and parking is a pain, but all in all the size hasn't been too much of an issue for me. The U of A is a good school if you like sports and partying, but for academics, I'd advise you to look elsewhere. The Honors College is helpful for research opportunities, grant funding, study abroad funding, and small classes sizes, but it definitely can't compare with the opportunities available at more prestigious/wealthier universities. The U of A was a good stepping stone but I don't think I would come here if I were to do it again.

    On another note, Arkansas residents are guaranteed an interview at UAMS and the in-state acceptance rate is something like 40%. If you work hard and make to the end of your premedical education with good stats, you'll stand a very good chance to become a doctor.

    I'm happy to answer any questions you might have.
     
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