Fakesmile

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Nov 10, 2008
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I've been working in a lab for 2 years. I was going to do an honors research course in the same lab this Fall semester. But the PI said he did not get CIHR grant funded, so his major source of funding will disappear and he can't accept any more honors research students. He said he applied for another funding and the process will take 12-18 months. Since I've been in the lab for 2 years and there is a project I've been working on and is almost close to completion, I'd like to continue it by volunteering, if not by honors research course, to make it into a publication. But does lack of CIHR funding for honors projects adversely affect other projects in the lab which aren't being done as part of honors research course? How exactly does funding work? Are there different kinds of fundings for different types of students (grads, undergrads)? In other words, even if his CIHR funding ran out, will he have enough of the other fundings for projects of grad students in the lab? I don't know how this whole thing works.
 
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shiftingmirage

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Sep 2, 2007
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But does lack of CIHR funding for honors projects adversely affect other projects in the lab which aren't being done as part of honors research course?
Possibly. If money from the CIHR was expected to pay for something, and you still need that something, well, you must get the money for it from somewhere. Let's say the money was going to buy a new instrument, and that instrument was going to be used on the honors project, as well as other projects. If you still need the instrument, you would have to buy it, but to buy it that money may need to come from another project.

How exactly does funding work? Are there different kinds of fundings for different types of students (grads, undergrads)? In other words, even if his CIHR funding ran out, will he have enough of the other fundings for projects of grad students in the lab? I don't know how this whole thing works.
Funding varies hugely. Some grants are grad only, undergrad only, or both. And when they are both, there can be different terms, ug student get 5k while grad gets 10k. Some places are stringent in that, if you submit project x, you must follow it. Others are more flexible, where you can play with it to some extent. My ug gave out grants, and you had to submit a proposal, but you could throw said proposal out the window and do something else. I don't think most external grants are as flexible.

In other words, even if his CIHR funding ran out, will he have enough of the other fundings for projects of grad students in the lab? I don't know how this whole thing works.
The only person who will be able to answer your question is your PI, or whoever deals with funding of the lab.
 

URHere

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Nov 20, 2007
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But does lack of CIHR funding for honors projects adversely affect other projects in the lab which aren't being done as part of honors research course? How exactly does funding work? Are there different kinds of fundings for different types of students (grads, undergrads)? In other words, even if his CIHR funding ran out, will he have enough of the other fundings for projects of grad students in the lab? I don't know how this whole thing works.
It sounds from your post like you are in Canada. I don't know how the Canadian system works, exactly, but I'll assume it's similar to the system in the US.

Generally, PIs apply for different grants for different things. The largest grants are usually used to cover the lab's primary projects, and smaller grants (like training grants) are used to cover the cost of training students. Training students, or allowing them to do independent projects costs a great deal of money, and the training grants pay for student salaries, materials needed for student projects, training costs, etc.

I don't know what your specific situation is, but if your personal project is very closely related to projects your PI oversees - meaning that any chemicals, reagents, or equipment you need is already in the lab, and that your results would help to answer your PIs questions - you might have a chance at continuing in the lab on a volunteer basis. You may need to switch projects to make that work, and you should definitely speak with your PI.