SN2ed

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Check out this thread which is basically asking the same thing.

Going from 30 to a 40 on the MCAT, is it realistic?

http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showthread.php?p=9099583

Honestly, you should just ignore him.

Alright here's the math breakdown from the AAMC's Retester data: http://www.aamc.org/students/mcat/admissionsadvisors/examstatistics/retester/start.htm

Let's say he scored PS 10 VR 5 BS 10 for 25

0 test takers have increased either their PS or BS by 5 points. This rules out getting a PS 15 or BS 15. Let's say by some miracle, he was the ONE test taker that increased their PS by 4 points AND the ONE test taker that increased their BS by 4 points. Again, this is so improbable, it's ridiculous.

That leaves us with PS 14 VR ? BS 14 for 28 without verbal.

If his verbal was a 5, there have only been 2 retakers out of tens of thousands that have improved by 5 points. There have been no retakers that have improved by more than 5 points.

Hence, the max possible would be PS 14 VR 10 BS 14 for 38. In all three cases, the person would have to be the 1, 2 in the case of verbal, that have increased their score that much in each section.

I must be pretty bored to actually go through the math. Yeah, just ignore him. You'll run into those types from time to time.
 
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Flapjacks

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Post 37 is very top heavy. Missing 1 point is equal to 1 point less for the section unlike sub 12's.

Just know your concepts and read the question carefully.
 
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Check out this thread which is basically asking the same thing.

Going from 30 to a 40 on the MCAT, is it realistic?

http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showthread.php?p=9099583

Honestly, you should just ignore him.

Alright here's the math breakdown from the AAMC's Retester data: http://www.aamc.org/students/mcat/admissionsadvisors/examstatistics/retester/start.htm

Let's say he scored PS 10 VR 5 BS 10 for 25

0 test takers have increased either their PS or BS by 5 points. This rules out getting a PS 15 or BS 15. Let's say by some miracle, he was the ONE test taker that increased their PS by 4 points AND the ONE test taker that increased their BS by 4 points. Again, this is so improbable, it's ridiculous.

That leaves us with PS 14 VR ? BS 14 for 28 without verbal.

If his verbal was a 5, there have only been 2 retakers out of tens of thousands that have improved by 5 points. There have been no retakers that have improved by more than 5 points.

Hence, the max possible would be PS 14 VR 10 BS 14 for 38. In all three cases, the person would have to be the 1, 2 in the case of verbal, that have increased their score that much in each section.

I must be pretty bored to actually go through the math. Yeah, just ignore him. You'll run into those types from time to time.
Yikes that is depressing data. I scored a 5 on VR my first time but that was without any studying whatsover and 10 years ago before there were all these strategies/MCAT prep books, etc. Now I'm hitting around 10.

Small correction-It's actually percent increase not actually numbers. So 2% of 1293 people went from a 5 to a 10 which would be about 27 people or so.
 

unDRdog

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possible...yes

likely, no!!

especially with actually studying the first time and trying to raise verbal the most, which is the hardest section to bring up.
agreed...verbal sucks. either you have it or you dont.... its the hardes thing to learn
 

NYR56

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First of all, who cares what he did, it won't affect you so don't worry about it.

For him to actually have done that though, he would have had to study pretty poorly the first time around and then really locked it down for the second time. I find that pretty hard to believe, especially if you look at the stats others posted.

I jumped 12 points from diag to actual, but as others have said, diags are not particularly useful (except for seeing what you're preparing for). So it's possible to have a 15 point jump if you totally blew off the first MCAT but I don't know why someone would do that.
 

MegaSpectacular

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So quite a few of my friends are in their prep stage. This one guy in my class, the first time he took MCAT he scored 10 or above on sciences and I think a 3 or a 5 for a total of 25 (after good studying, not just taking it cold). Then he said he worked really hard to score a 40+. For some reason, I find this really unlikely. Maybe if he didn't study the first time around then I guess it's possible. AAMC statistics show many people scoring the same or worse and he's saying he did a 15+ jump?

I feel like he's just psyching my friends out, like prep courses telling you that knowing a friend did well on MCAT is one of the big stress factors when you take yours. It doesn't really matter, but I just get annoyed by people lying so much about statistics sometimes. My GPA sucks and I don't care. If you're not proud of how you did then you don't have to share, but I totally don't see the point in lying to people you consider friends.
And for the record, I did NOT ask him how he did on his MCAT, he willingly offers us info.
I don't think this is possible. I mean, if you prepare and try each time.

Now yeah, I could go into a physics exam and get a 20% if I only fill out a few questions, then go get 100% if I study and try BUT the first time I wasn't really trying. So... It is always possible to make a big jump if you mess around the first time. But if each time you prep this is an unlikely jump.
 

SN2ed

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Do you have assigned seats? Just move. If it really bugs you, you could simply say, "prove it." It's not like it's hard to pull up your score on the computer. Heck, here's a link:

https://services.aamc.org/mcatthx/

You'll also see his past score. Oh and if he says, I don't want to show you my social security number, don't worry it's not shown. All you see are the last four ssn digits.
 

ronaldo23

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It's just so annoying to sit in class with him nearby trying to psych my friends out, rambling on about his improved score. Trust me, it does make you nervous as heck when you have your MCAT coming up in a week or two weeks and hearing how well your friends did. You don't want to be the single person that can't clear the bar. That's why I told my friends I did fine on the MCAT but would share my exact score with them after they took theirs.

When he's talking I'm just thinking "Uh yea, it's highly improbable to make great improvement in any single section and you're saying you did that in all three?" I'm surprised I have the self control to not call him on his bs yet. But then if it makes him feel better. I just tell my friends to try their best for a good score and not think about his 42 or something.
It's the worst hearing people talk about their mcat success in real life, when you have the test coming up in a few weeks. It's really bad when you know people scoring 35+ who think that it's super easy to get above a 30. I found that I hated talking about the mcat at all with anyone during my studying phase (parents, premed friends or nonpremed friends), and so you might just do yourself a service to sit away from these people, and surround yourselves with others until you sit in for it.