torque

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Feb 28, 2005
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Hey guys.
The time is coming for me to cut off the lingering hope and prepare for the next step. sigh.
Well, I have a low science GPA (under 3.0) and I think it might be what's holding my application.
So, to boost up my GPA side of the application, I have two options.

First, take some more post bacc classes from community college.
I have taken all of my pre-req classes at community college due to having majored in psychology and it might not be favorable to some schools I know.

Second, apply for a Masters Program.
I have been looking at Masters in Healthcare Ethics in Creighton.
It isn't specifically a science program, but what do you guys think?

I can't decide if I want to invest $20000 or more for the master and it wouldn't help me getting into dental school, or just take some classes at community college.

Well, what do you guys say?
Thanks in advance!

FYI, DAT score of 19, lots of shadowing hours, etc.
 

Mudfever

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When I was starting back to school (nontrad) I went and spoke with a dean of admissions. As far as post bac vs. master's, he said that he wants to see how I handle UG sciences before recommending a Master's. I had some sci's but 1st degree was a B.S. in Business. He said the Master's route is mostly for people who have a sci. degree with avg grades and need to prove they can handle grad level courses.

First, some schools don't accept CC credits. So make sure and check with the schools you are applying to.

If your Sci GPA is that low, I would suggest that you first need to retake your upperlevel sciences at a 4yr Univ. Take the heaviest load you can and make mostly A's and maybe... a B here and there. This shows that you can handle a heavy science load (ie. DS).

If you do the Master's, you also need to make mostly A's and a few B's. If you struggle with all C's and a few B's, you are hurting your chances. This is because DS carries a heavier load than a trad. Master's program.

I have been there with the low GPA (in my business degree) and know it is a hard uphill battle. But if it's what you want to do, it's worth it. Hope this helps.

Mud
 

torque

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Feb 28, 2005
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When I was starting back to school (nontrad) I went and spoke with a dean of admissions. As far as post bac vs. master's, he said that he wants to see how I handle UG sciences before recommending a Master's. I had some sci's but 1st degree was a B.S. in Business. He said the Master's route is mostly for people who have a sci. degree with avg grades and need to prove they can handle grad level courses.

First, some schools don't accept CC credits. So make sure and check with the schools you are applying to.

If your Sci GPA is that low, I would suggest that you first need to retake your upperlevel sciences at a 4yr Univ. Take the heaviest load you can and make mostly A's and maybe... a B here and there. This shows that you can handle a heavy science load (ie. DS).

If you do the Master's, you also need to make mostly A's and a few B's. If you struggle with all C's and a few B's, you are hurting your chances. This is because DS carries a heavier load than a trad. Master's program.

I have been there with the low GPA (in my business degree) and know it is a hard uphill battle. But if it's what you want to do, it's worth it. Hope this helps.

Mud
Hey thanks for your reply.
The thing with taking science classes at a 4 yr university is that they don't let you take the bio or chem specific courses unless you are a student of that university in that major.
So my only option is take a science class at UCLA Extension(pretty much only university that offers such a thing), but one at a time since it's in a series.
So do you think doing the masters in healthcare ethics, which is not going to raise the science GPA, wouldn't do much help?
Thanks !
 

dentalWorks

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in 2007 I started taking post-bacc classes cause my initial undergrad GPA was 3.0 and science was 3.1. Masters wouldn't have helped me here cause it does not add into your undergrad GPA, plus I hadn't taken any of my pre-dental classes either (I was computer science / math major).

Right now (3 years later), I have 54 credits on a solid 4.0 run, my overall gpa is brought up to 3.3, science is between 3.6-3.7.

One thing you need to remember is, many schools have expiration date on the DAT, so if you just took the DAT, you have about 2-3 years to apply
 

Mudfever

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Did you get a degree in psychology? If so, from a 4yr university? If you did, you should be able to register with that school for continuing ed./post bac. courses. If you didn't finish a degree, or go to a 4yr univ., then you need to look at your options and decide if you really want to do this. If so, then you need to know that this will be a multi year process and you might have to retake the DAT (as stated above).

You are correct that no school (4yr univ.) will let you take the classes unless you are enrolled. I know that none of the schools I am looking at accept CC credits. From your post, I assume you are a CA resident. I don't have the book infront of me, but you need to see if any of the state schools in CA accept CC credits (and for all pre-req's). If so, then the CC thing might work. If not, then you will need to register at a 4 yr univ. Go talk to their pre-dent advisor and ask their opinoin. Go talk to a dean of admissions at one or more of your state DS's and seek their advice.

Your best bet (bc of the low GPA) will be in-state schools (vs. out of state and private). I am assuming you recently (within the last 3 years) took your pre-req's. If that is the case, then Academic Bankruptcy is out of the question (required 3yr gap with no coursework). And if you do already have a degree, then you wouldn't want to file bankruptcy anyway. (As a side note, even when people bankrupt their past courses, they are still on your transcripts, but they are noted and the schools are not supposed to consider them in their calculations.)

You do have to take the courses in a series (usually), that is why I said it will take a few years. In 5 semesters and 2 summers, I earned 90 hours of credit. During that time, I went to school full time during the day and worked at night and on weekends. My wife and I also had our first child. In those 2 1/2 yrs, I only made 2 B's and one C. And all of this while I had a 2.- in my first degree (really enjoyed those 6 yrs). What I am trying to say is that it is doable.

If dentistry is what you really want to do, then don't let anything stop you. I am in no way trying to discourage you, but inform you and make you aware of what's instore. In the long run, 2-3 years of work to get into DS and 4 yrs of DS, and you will have 20-50 years to enjoy being a dentist. Good luck with everything, and I wish you the best.

Mud
 
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