Feb 18, 2013
2
0
Status
Pre-Medical
Hello everyone. I am seeking some advice. I am a recent graduate from Cal State Long Beach (BA in International Studies 3.58 GPA). I have come to the decision that I want to pursue a career in the medical field. I recently moved to Arizona, but there are no post-bac pre-med programs here, so I am planning to attend either the University of Arizona or Arizona State University as a non-degree seeking student. I'm afraid that without an advisor I will end up off track, so I've come to seek your advice. The only science classes I've taken are general biology (B grade) and general biology lab (A grade), although I do plan on retaking these. I've also only taken college algebra because I did not need to go further for my degree. Can someone please help me decide which classes I need to take to be a competitive applicant for medical school? I would very much appreciate it! Thank you very much.
 

Erakis

5+ Year Member
Jan 24, 2013
178
8
Status
Resident [Any Field]
You will need a full year of biology with lab, a full year of general chemistry, and a full year of organic chemistry to meet the basic prereqs. Biochemistry is becoming a requirement for some schools, and will probably become more common in the future. It also helps with the MCAT quite a bit. Genetics and molecular biology will make you attractive to the more competitive schools of you do well on the MCAT and your bost bacc work. Statistics is another course that is becoming a popular prereq. Keep in mind that their will also be psych and sociology requirements after 2015 as well.

What is most important, however, is that you keep your GPA as high as you can, so don't overload yourself when you register for classes.
 

Bamfu

5+ Year Member
Jun 30, 2012
173
30
Status
Medical Student
Erakis has some sound advice.

You need to find the course work required for your target schools and knock them out. That usually consists of assorted biology courses, chem 1 and 2, organic 1 and 2, physics 1 and 2. My med school required genetics as well. There are, of course, gen eds you'll be required to do, but you've probably already done them in your bachelor work.

I only applied (and was accepted last Friday!) to one school, so I just logged onto their online catalog and figured out which courses I had to take.. then I took them 2 at a time.

Most med schools have pretty regular requirements (as mentioned above), but they love to see success in higher level science (especially biology) courses. Your 3.58 is not bad, but it is below average for med school acceptance. Take the science courses as Erakis suggested and collect some EC (shadowing and clinical volunteering hours). If you can manage to improve your GPA some with your science courses, that's great. AFAIK, cGPA (cumulative GPA) and sGPA (science GPA) are considered.

Good luck!!
 

IAE

Feb 26, 2013
1
0
Status
Hi everyone.I am currently working on finishing my degree in Architecture. I should finish with a gpa of 3.6.However, I have 4 C's. Would it be a good idea to retake some of these classes to get a higher grade? I will graduate with honors and I have received a few awards in my undergrad studies. The only science classes that I have taken are Physics I and II and I received a B and B+. I am volunteering in a hospital in where I have a lot of patient contact. Also, this summer I will be shadowing doctors. What are my chances of getting into a post bacc program? Is there anything else I can do to enhance my application?
 

Goro

7+ Year Member
Jun 10, 2010
52,653
76,385
Somewhere west of St. Louis
Status
Non-Student
If possible, add anatomy and/or physiology to this sound advice below.


You will need a full year of biology with lab, a full year of general chemistry, and a full year of organic chemistry to meet the basic prereqs. Biochemistry is becoming a requirement for some schools, and will probably become more common in the future. It also helps with the MCAT quite a bit. Genetics and molecular biology will make you attractive to the more competitive schools of you do well on the MCAT and your bost bacc work. Statistics is another course that is becoming a popular prereq. Keep in mind that their will also be psych and sociology requirements after 2015 as well.

What is most important, however, is that you keep your GPA as high as you can, so don't overload yourself when you register for classes.
 
Mar 1, 2013
1
0
Status
So I am 34yrs married with a little girl 18months. I am a resp therapist and have been working for about 4yrs. i have 2 BS>>one in biology from 2003 and another in Resp care 2009. I want to go to medical school to be a general practitioner. I really don't have the funds to do a post bacc prog but if I have to I will. My GPA from biology is not the best but my GPA from Resp care was good. I am considering going to the local CC to take some refresher classes like biochem, Orgo, physics before taking the MCAT. Any Advise before going too far will be great. thanks
 
Dec 20, 2012
10
0
Los Angeles, CA
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
... Keep in mind that their will also be psych and sociology requirements after 2015 as well.
Oh? Would you elaborate on this eventual psych and socio requirement? Is this for med schools or for the MCAT changes in 2015?

I'm currently starting my prereq planning for eventual entry into med school 2015/2016...so this is important to know.

Thanks!
 

Erakis

5+ Year Member
Jan 24, 2013
178
8
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Oh? Would you elaborate on this eventual psych and socio requirement? Is this for med schools or for the MCAT changes in 2015?

I'm currently starting my prereq planning for eventual entry into med school 2015/2016...so this is important to know.

Thanks!
From AAMC regarding the 2015 MCAT revision
The changes to the MCAT exam in 2015 preserve what works about the current exam, eliminate what isn't working, and further enrich the MCAT exam by giving attention to the concepts tomorrow's doctors will need.

Natural sciences sections of the MCAT2015 exam reflect recent changes in medical education.
Addition of the social and behavioral sciences section, Psychological, Social and Biological Foundations of Behavior, recognizes the importance of socio-cultural and behavioral determinants of health and health outcomes.
And the new Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills section reflects the fact that medical schools want well-rounded applicants from a variety of backgrounds.