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potential interview problems

Discussion in 'Pre-Dental' started by dentalapp, Oct 19, 2002.

  1. dentalapp

    dentalapp Member
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    I'll be starting my first string of interviews shortly at a variety of dental schools.

    But are you allowed to leave right after the interviews? ( hopefully, all the applicants there will be having separate interviews; no group interviews please )

    Do you absolutely have to eat lunch with other people, talk to other dental applicants, meet with current dental students, and then go on a tour? ( The lunch part really scares me because I seriously NEVER had breakfast, lunch, or dinner with anyone for the past 11 years. I don't even remember my experience in eating with someone. )

    Do the admissions people actually judge you by the way you do the activities I listed above?

    I normally have problems involving myself with a large group of people. But with like 1 or 2 people, I am at ease.

    Will I be encountering any problems? Any suggestions?
     
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  3. conf88

    conf88 Member
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    Are you Kidding??? So you are telling us for past 11 years you have never had food in a resturant or a school cafeteria. Or did not have lunch/dinner with a family member or a date. You are kidding, right??

    I do not mean to be rude or not understaning, but it is kind of hard for me to picture this. But if you are seriouse, then you better fix this problem before you set your foot in dental school. Once accepted you will be in a class with 100 other people, and they will be your family for four hard and stressfull years. At times you will feel as if you are living with them, you will eat, work, study, go out and go to class with them, so you better be very very comfortable with being in a large group, a very large group.

    IMHO you should see someone and talk it out and try to solve this. I am sure it is something that many people are facing and there are ways to solve it, and you still have time to do it.

    Also for some schools like BU the interview is after the lunch. And even if it is before it would be kind of rude to leave, since usually after lunch they have other actvities like school tour or financial aid discussion. But again this is just the begining, how are you going to dodge these activities for four year?????????
     
  4. tinker bell

    tinker bell 1K Member
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    You're cracking me up. Are you from mars or something? :oops:
    What do you mean by haven't eaten with any one for the last 11 years? I hope you don't mean that you are not even invited to go to any xmas or thanksgiving dinner? How about eating with roomate?

    Don't worry too much, the lunch at the dental school was pretty casual, relax. You'll get to eat with other candidates, some dental students, some administrators. You can only talk with a few people who sit next to you. Not a whole lot of people so don't worry about other people watching you eating and talking.

    Just relax and carry a casual conversation. Ask your questions about their school. Before you know it, it's over.
    If you are nervous, practice eating with someone. Just take someone out to lunch and talk to that person.
    Best of luck
    T
     
  5. dentalapp

    dentalapp Member
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    It doesn't matter but can you just tell me a bit more about this?

    IS there like an implicit purpose for the admissions/dental students/other applicants to be having lunch with you? Is this like one of those hidden admissions criteria where they use this to gauge your personal skills? If so, how scrutinous is it?

    What about those dental school tours and those meetings with dental students? Are there going to be interviews done in groups? If so, how many and who will be the other people in the interview room?

    Why do they make it this complicated? Are all of these mandatory? Any exceptions to this 'rule?'

    What type of difficulties would I be facing in all the situations listed above?

    I find myself worry about this every since I got the interviews and, instead of rejoicing, I sometimes wished that I didn't get them. It looks like I'm going to be facing long interviews, not to mention the gap between my application and dental school acceptance.

    Yeah, it sounds funny to social people who have a lot of friends. But this is ponderous for those who don't have those traits.

    I sometimes ate with my family, alright. But it depends on how you ask, because in my situation, I usually eat with my family at the same time but I eventually take my food to the couch in front of the TV or computer. In college, there really is no such thing as a 'school cafeteria.' You simply go those food/snack bars, buy something, and bring them to an empty table to finish. Everyone has a different schedule and there are many new faces in college, making it a very impersonal environment.

    Then there was high school and junior high school where you are assigned the same lunch time as everyone. And you are supposed to sit with them, too. But you have to realize that I never did ( and still don't ) have any friends. As a result, I literally just sat at my seat and ate, not paying any attention elsewhere.


    So help me please.
     
  6. s.mutans

    s.mutans Senior Member
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    I have only been on two interviews here is my advice. The first interview is very nerve-racking. It really depends on how you handle it. Just be yourself. If you are an introvert, then you have to make some adjustments. Just smile at eveybody and make simple conversation. If you find yourself really nervous just think that you have nothing to lose. YOu received interviews while many do not receive interviews. Be happy

    I was wrecked for my first interview and really babbled on about anything and everything. I prettty much went on a tangent even maybe was disoriented. Think of it this way, ;) . ASk ASk Ask! Make people talk about themselves. It is a natural instinct. The more interviewers talk, the more relaxed you are.

    Lunches are for asking students about the school. Even tours! ASk ask Ask!

    There is great information about intervieww processes in this forum in the specific schools check them out.!!

    You are not alone!! everybody is a little worried. But Worry robs you of happiness.

    What schools are you intervieweing at dent app?
     
  7. Awwww. Please don't stress yourself too much. I was scared to death before my first interview, but once I got there I was wondering why I was so nervous. It's not like a typical interview situation where you are the only one, but there are usually 10 other applicants there with you in the same boat. This will really help you relax knowing that everyone is going through the same thing. As for the eating part, it's not a formal lunch. Just sitting in a cafeteria chatting.

    Good luck!
     
  8. ohgee

    ohgee Senior Member
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    Hey Dentalapp...

    s.mutans is right, just keep asking questions. Even if the informal lunches are a test of your interpersonal skills, don't worry. Just smile, shake hands, sit and eat properly. And ask questions! Make them talk and you just listen. The students probably won't ask any hard questions, they probably just want to know where you are from, and where you go to school, etc. If you are afraid to answer questions, then just keep asking them question about the school! They will think that you are very intersted in the school and report good things about ya.

    I understand how you feel, I am acutally going to my first interview next week. I am nervous too. I understand because I consider myself as introvert as well. You just have to do it! there's no way out. Just make the best out of it! I prepared a set of questions for the schools already. The more you do your homework, the more you will be at ease!

    good luck!
     
  9. s.mutans

    s.mutans Senior Member
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    Interesting discussion on how social interactions are decreasing with new technology. Email, forums like this, text messaging, I can probably assume that most sdner's are more introverts versus extroverts. Many people adjust in being both. There are also many different types of communication personalities that affect how we handle situations. Well thats a whole new health communications topic!

    GOOD LUCK! DOnt' WORRY :( BE HAPPY:)
     
  10. dentalapp

    dentalapp Member
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    On the contrary, that is one of my concerns.

    In addition to not having been used to eating with others and socializing, you'll also be interviewing together with other dental applicants ( i.e. competitors, to be frank ) and you have to have lunch with them and you'll have some admissions officers and current dental students joining in so they can assess and factor in your personal skills so they can have extra reasons for accepting and rejecting people.

    And not to mention, you'll be walking around with them the whole day, while the faculty and dental students judge your every moves.

    It doesn't......sound so good. :(
     
  11. conf88

    conf88 Member
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    Dentalapp,

    From what you wrote I believe for sure you need to talk to someone professional. I do not want to put a labed on how you feel but there are names for these kind of feelings which I do not think I should put anything in your head. We all have the same feelings as you have, intimidated by others, not sure how to act and etc.. but I think from what you wrote yours is more sever. Here everyone will tell you of their exprience, but then everyone has their own unique feelings. And yours is unique too.

    You need to talk and get professional advising as to why you feel so. If you have these feelings for your interviews, then how would you feel once get accepted and about to start the dental school. I strongly recommend taking some action and seeking professional advice.

    As far as interviews, the people that are interviewing you are humans too, they speak english and they do not expect anything out of ordinary from you, and most of the interviews are just formalities, so just relax and take it as it comes, do not sit and anticipate how things will be, things will be the way you want them to be. Which school are you going to be interviewed??? And where are you from?? And dental schools never accept or reject anyone because of the interview, common I have seen people being accepted without even being able to speak proper english!! SO TAKE IT EASY DUDE, AND HAVE FUN ON YOUR INTERVIEW DAY.
    Good Luck.
     
  12. dentalapp

    dentalapp Member
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    Ok. You got me. I admit my personality falls more to the neurotic side. Frankly, I may just be that.

    But as long as I can get in, I would be fine. After all, entering dental classes are normally large at around 100-200 students. Auditorium lectures fit me just fine. If I can handle my senior engineering classes with 30 people ( didn't get to know anyone but I managed to get by, all on my own ) , I know that I can handle dental school in regards to social aspects.

    You mentioned that dental schools do not make admissions decision based on the interview. Then why do they require it and what is it with the stress-test in the interviews that other posters so frequently talk about? I understand that interviews are also meant to benefit the applicants by introducing to them the school. But wouldn't that be an open house invitation, rather than being an interview?
     
  13. conf88

    conf88 Member
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    Interview is just one of the admission requirements. They faculty just like to see you and most of the time sale you the school. Dude you are putting too much thought into this interview thing. It is the last thing you should be concerned with. Believe me it is a fun day and not a stressfull day at all. And no school puts you through a stress-test. I just heard about two on this board out of my be 1000's. RELAX that is all I can tell you. If you are going to be so anxiouse about it take a Xanax or something for your first interview!!!! And then after your first one you will see how fun it was and you were worrying for nothing.
     
  14. I'm not a mental health doctor, but this sounds like you're suffering from social anxiety. You should try talking to a doctor about getting some anti anxiety medication. It will definitely help you from over obsessing and stressing about this.
     
  15. dentalapp

    dentalapp Member
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    One more thing. Even if I didn't have worries, I wouldn't know how to act when eating lunch, conversing, or taking a tour with the group. I'm not used to this and I don't ever recall doing something like this. What should I do?

    As for the other applicants you'll be meeting, how do you handle this? When you had your interviews, did you feel an urge to be competitive or aggressive because they are your competitors and probably wish that you didn't get into those few 100 seats? Did you actually be friendly and open with them as much as to share your stats and wish each other luck?
     
  16. jakephish

    jakephish New Member

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    I don't mean to cause problems, but dentistry is a field where you intimately and continuously interact with other people. Unless you're doing forensic dentistry on crime victims, how will you handle the daily interactions with your patients? It has been my impression that there is a trend in dental education to remove the stigma of traumatic patient experiences by teaching both operative and psychological techniques for the clinic. Thus indicates the importance of chairside manner and ability to communicate with the patient.
    I could be totally off base, and I am in no way in a position to judge anyone else's credentials or potential to be a wonderful dentist, but if I was an admissions officer I'd pay close attention not only to how a candidate interacted with me as an individual, but also at the luncheons or group events to see how he could contribute and communicate with his or her colleagues.
    I'm not trying to scare you at all, and I dont know any of this for a fact, but its been my impression from the officers and students that once you reach the interview they are looking at you as a person, and not as an academic entity. I would think that your presence and comfort in as a part of the interviewing group is essential to yielding a positive impression on the admissions officer.
     
  17. dentalapp

    dentalapp Member
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    I could handle the patients, as I'm comfortable in dealing with 1 or 2 people. It's just that I can't handle being in group situations.

    And yes, I agree with you on what the admissions officers would probably want to see. And that's what I'm afraid of, except for the individual part.
     
  18. Beagle

    Beagle Meet BEAGLE
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    dentalapp
    I sent you a PM!
    beagle
     
  19. dentalapp

    dentalapp Member
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    uh....okay. So what do you guys think I should do?

    Are there anyone here who doesn't like to be with people ( except for patients ), eats and goes to the movies alone, have little or no friends, and enjoys doing everything himself?

    Are there anyone here who fits one or more characteristics described above and had gone through the interview process and got into dental school?
     
  20. DesiDentist

    DesiDentist G. S. Khurana, DMD, MBA
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    It is nice sometimes to be alone. But still many many people, including myself, enjoy the company of others. That is why I chose dentistry and not research.

    Just curious dentalapp. why did you choose dentistry. Denitistry is not just a dentist-patient gig. You have to have other people around you too, like hygenists, dental assistants, and administration. You have to get along with all of them and at the same time.

    Try to involve yourself in group activities. Ask a good looking girl out on a date. Or double date. These are very important qualities in life. I know it will be hard in the beginning, but I assure you that you will be happy you did this.

    Good luck,

    DesiDentist
     
  21. dentalapp

    dentalapp Member
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    I chose dentistry for the same reasons everyone else here did. Like I said, I don't mind working with 1 or 2 people in a comfortable environment.

    Unlike other types of health professions, you ca be on your own in dentistry. You can do everything solo.

    As for dental assistants/hygienists, I know some dentists who don't use them at all. Maybe I'll do the same.

    My dislike and unwillingness in doing group activities will only hinder my dental school interview but I am confident that it will affect my life even less after that interview hurdle.

    You also suggested that I ask a good looking girl on a date or a double date. Unfortunately, that will not work because I do not like women and I could not comprehend the definition of beauty. I do not want to love or be loved. I am also not gay, mind you.

    From the lack of responses, I guess there's no one quite like me, or maybe there is but he's being secretive. I'll just do it and see what happens.
     
  22. portlander

    portlander Member
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    I don't know why, but that last post made me so sad. What makes you happy? I would be lost without my love.

    Once a friend asked at lunch "what do you want to be when you grow up?" Another of my friends answered, "happy." And that is the best answer--I think.

    As long as you are happy going solo, there is nothing wrong with it.
     
  23. dentalapp

    dentalapp Member
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    Thanks for your sympathy. However, I was looking for some core tips on this but I don't think people like me are common here and that is why I'm not getting the feedback I want.

    I might as well look forward to the interviews.

    Since there may be someone like me on the board, I'll probably post each and every moves I made and as to whether I got accepted.

    That will make my mark on this board for the newer generation. ;)
     
  24. gryffindor

    Dentist 10+ Year Member

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    The interview isn't the last time you have to be in a large group setting in dentistry. Let's see...

    Mandatory Group Situations I've Encountered in Dental School Thus Far
    First year: Gross Anatomy - dissected and presented in groups of 8; students were dissecting on top of each other when we got to the head & neck block b/c of the small space. Clinical Dentistry - group quizzes every involving discussing the questions in groups of 6. Also, had to give the other group members a grade based on participation, my guess is I would give you a 0 based on what you've told us here. Public Health - community presentations to elementary school kids in groups of 3 - 6. Biochem - group quizzes in groups of 8.

    Second year: Clinical Dentistry - work in groups of 3 - 4 practicing cleanings, assisting, injections on each other. All pre-clinical courses done in a massive noisy room with 90 students at the same time. I was surrounded by students on every side of me and since it is assigned seating alphabetically, it's not like you could hide in the corner if you want.

    Third year: Do several clinical rotations with groups of 5 - 7 students. Pediatric Dentistry done in a noisy clinic with upto 25 people in the same room as you - parents, kids, dentist, students, residents, assistants. During clinic, if you have an interesting case, your instructor can call over upto 5 or 6 students all hovering over you to see what's going on with your patient.

    After graduation - attending CE lectures and dental conferences to maintain your license and keep up to date with the profession's advances.

    You may have gotten by being alone in engineering courses where all that's required is a notebook, problem set, and calculator to succeed. But you're not going to make it through dental school without interacting with groups of people.

    But I would do as some of the others have suggested and please visit a mental health professional because they really can help you through this. There are counseling techniques and medications available to treat conditions you have described, and they do work. We are taught in dental school to recognize behavior patterns in our patients and you are not describing typical interactions and desires. If you have difficulty comprehending emotions such as love and beauty, it will be hard to relate to your patients sometimes because they will come to you with stories about their kids, problems, achievements, etc. You can't just quietly fix their disease and bill them, you won't build a patient base that way. Dentistry is 90% how you talk/interact with your patient, and 10% dentistry. There is help available, and take advantage of it now, early in your career to make it easier for you, your patients and your fellow colleagues you will work with in your career.
     
  25. slave4MD

    slave4MD Member
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    The stuck-up introvert who has no friends wanted to know about the interviews more than dental schools.

    Why would you care as to how he does in dental school? It is none of your business to tell him that he should learn to talk for dental school because it will benefit us all if we had dentists that either fail out for some reason or become bankrupt. We can use him as a doormat too. Just make sure you set up your office next to his so that you can steal his patients like taking candy from a baby. My young friend believe me, you do not want people to succeed. I'm not jokin
     
  26. groundhog

    groundhog 1K Member
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    Oh great, slave4MD is just the type of health care professional we need. He would would desire that we fail to to be completely healed of our affliictions and become chronic patient cash cows. If he is not joking, I wonder if he has the guts to expouse such views on his applications or at his interviews.

    I can't quit on this one. Imagine slave4MD as a medical officer in a group of prisoners of war. "Hey fellas, don't help out your sick and wounded buddies. Let em die so there will be more food and water left for us."
     
  27. slave4MD

    slave4MD Member
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    I'm not that dumb to write on that on my applications or talk about at the interviews.

    As much as doctors -- um I mean dentists sorry,

    so as much as they are supposed to help people, the profession is also a business. Only the fittest will survive and like in everything else you are likely to encounter people with talented skills all over the place.

    As for the war part, you bring up a good topic but imagine this. What if you had a husband and a bunch of kids to take care of? Shouldn't you be aggressive in protecting your share of food and water at war even in midst of wounded, dying, and starving comrades? Even if you were celibate and lived alone ( like that poster maybe ) wouldn't you care much about your life as to put it above the lives of others? Otherwise why the hell did you live ?
     
  28. groundhog

    groundhog 1K Member
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    Slave4MD,
    I have to admit that I do not know for sure if I would be heroic or selfish in every possible life or death challange. I would hope that I would usually choose the former course of action. And perhaps heroic and selfish are not always mutually exclusive in the long run. The movie King Rat is an interesting example. The title role character lived the good life in a prison of war camp by using darwinian business principles to exploit the needs of his fellow prisoners. However, when the camp was liberated, the worm truned, and the prisoners aggressivley demonstrated their hatred towards King Rat.

    Finally, I guess it comes down to one's core values. So, I cannot fault you for not revealing your true feelings about altruism to the medical admissions committees because such subtrafuge is consistant with your values. The one thing that bothers me about you becomming a health care professional is that you would likely take full economic advantage of a hypochondriac if one were to end up in your patient pool. This comes to mind because of a woman I knew who underwent countless surgical procedures trying to remedy some mysterious gastro-intestinal problem. She would always dominate the conversation detailing her difficulty and surgeries with great joy. I never knew a person who loved to go under the knife so much. Those of us who knew her suspected that she was a hypchondriac and that her surgeon was taking full advantage of her situation rather than referring her to a mental health specialist.
     

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