Pre-residency paperwork

Discussion in 'General Residency Issues' started by Kalel, Mar 29, 2004.

  1. Kalel

    Kalel Membership Revoked
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    Is anybody else having trouble filling out all of this pre-residency paper-work? Not only does my residency program want dates of vaccinations (which I have been making up for the past 10 yrs since I have no idea when I got them, I only know that I had them all done), they also want titers, a verified size of a PPD (not just whether or not it was negative), and a screening chest x-ray! And then there's all of this licensing stuff asking all of these official looking questions which want answers that I don't know (like whether or not I have "received credit" or even should list the residency program which I haven't started) and don't understand. The licensing sheet wants a signed affidavit witnessed by a physician. Does my dad count? Does anybody know what a notary is too? I'd hate to get kicked out of my program for not filling out all of this paperwork correctly.
     
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  2. MariaG

    MariaG Junior Member
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    call the program up and ask them your specific questions
     
  3. Seaglass

    Seaglass Quantum Member
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    A notary is a public official who records contracts/signatures. You can find them in the phone book or at AAA. In the phone book look under "notary public"

    C
     
  4. amsomerv

    amsomerv Junior Member
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    A notary is just a person who is liscensed to witness that you actually signed a document and you are who you say you are. They have to take a test like every seven years or something and they have a special stamp that they put on your paper and they sign to say that you signed it. Usually you can find one most banks and they usually charge a fee to notarize something like 3 to 5 dollars
     
  5. Fabio

    Fabio Senior Member
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    I agree . . . the paperwork is a bummer. Everyone told me it would just be a "couple things to sign", yeah right.

    At least for part of the immunization stuff, my school sent all of us an official copy of what they had on file for us in terms of our immunization record, PPD, CXR, etc. We are allowed to submit this instead of recopying everything down on the official sheet . . . you may want to ask you school. It would save you the trouble of trying to "remember" your vaccination dates.:)

    I just called up my program on Friday and spent about 1/2 hour on the phone getting all my questions answered until I was satisfied. They will thank you in the end for not sending in stuff that was done incorrectly or incompletely.

    Good luck!
     
  6. edmadison

    edmadison 1K Member
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    I have used a bank notory at least five times and never been charged for it (at banks where I didn't have an account). If you have questions about the paperwork, call the office -- that's what those people get paid for.

    Ed
     
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  7. Adawaal

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    Kalel --

    I'm feeling your pain, having just filled out my paperwork for both my prelim year and for residency as well. Just remember to make copies of everything you send out!

    I think most schools have one of their Student Affairs folks as a notary public. Even if that's not the case with you, they have likely been asked before and can point you in the direction of someone at school who is.
     

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