SDN members see fewer ads and full resolution images. Join our non-profit community!

Professional Psychology

Discussion in 'Psychology [Psy.D. / Ph.D.]' started by Psychbound, Apr 6, 2007.

  1. Psychbound

    Psychbound

    6
    0
    Mar 27, 2007
    Hi Everyone!

    Just a quick question....

    Can someone explain the difference between a psychology and professional psychology program? GW's clinical PsyD falls under professional psychology and I'm not sure what all of the implications are.

    Thank you!
    :)
     
  2. SDN Members don't see this ad. About the ads.
  3. Ollie123

    Ollie123 10+ Year Member

    4,579
    951
    Feb 19, 2007
    As far as I know there is no inherent difference in the programs themselves (though there are often actual differences), its just the type of institution that offers them.

    Generally speaking, professional schools want YOUR money, non-professional schools want the governments money (via grants you help them get).

    Professional school is a polite way of saying you're unlikely to get any funding, and will probably come out with a ton of debt.

    That being said, I could be wrong on this so take it with a grain of salt. But that is how I have always heard it explained.

    Edit: Also - professional programs are generally only loosely tied to the university itself and are generally free-standing institutions.
     
  4. Therapist4Chnge

    Therapist4Chnge Neuropsych Ninja Faculty Faculty Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    21,184
    2,063
    Oct 6, 2006
    The Beach
    *This is a very polarized topic, so I'd request that people don't flame and/or go too far off track. This has been covered in the past, so this thread won't re-invent the wheel. Let's see how it goes.....*


    Professional schools are free standing (not associated with a university), and were basically a response to produce more trained (doctoral) clinicians. Some argue they are not needed...I happen to think they have a place, but I think they need to be overhauled, downsized, and the quality made more consistent. (obviously, just my personal opinion)

    I think the training can vary greatly; I know graduates from some that are excellent, but others who suck (to be blunt). Traditional programs can also produce excellent/poor clinicians....so YMMV.

    They tend to not be very well funded (if at all). I think this is one of the biggest knocks. The rep of the schools definitely vary......the funding and larger size tend to be the two biggest knocks. I think you can still get very good training, but it will be more costly (obviously) and you need to make sure to align yourself with the right mentors. Traditional programs don't guarantee great (or even good) training, so make sure to do your homework.

    Basically......do your homework, whether or not you are looking at traditional programs or at a professional program.

    -t
     
  5. Jon Snow

    Jon Snow Senior Member 10+ Year Member

    3,033
    321
    Aug 5, 2005
    . . . a caveat. . .

    Professional schools are also affiliated with universities . . . the university based professional schools still suffer from the same pitfalls as the standalones.


    Here is a list of schools that consider themselves to be professional schools. . .

    http://www.ncspp.info/byregion.htm


    I find it interesting that Rutgers is on this list and Baylor is not. Given the other programs on the list, I wonder why Rutgers would want to be affiliated?


    Fairly much all of the listed programs are for-profit. There will be limited funding and generally little respect from an academic standpoint. These are not top or even mid-tier universities for the most part.

    They will get you a clinical psych degree and you can practice . . . but at what cost?
     
  6. Therapist4Chnge

    Therapist4Chnge Neuropsych Ninja Faculty Faculty Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    21,184
    2,063
    Oct 6, 2006
    The Beach
    I'd argue that most/all of the university programs are not. That being said, most will still cost you $$. I think it is important to understand that investment, and to weigh if that is worth it to you. Someone mentioned that it may cost upwards of $1,000/mon to repay...definitely something to consider.

    -t
     
  7. Therapist4Chnge

    Therapist4Chnge Neuropsych Ninja Faculty Faculty Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    21,184
    2,063
    Oct 6, 2006
    The Beach
    I think it depends on the program. I've mentioned in other threads...if academia (full professor / tenure) is where you want to end up, you should look very long and hard at traditional Clinical PhD programs. There are exceptions, but academia is very picky about stuff like that, and because of the demand....they can pretty much hand pick who they want.

    I go to Nova (a university based program), and I think the clinical training is great, but the funding sucks. I knew that going in, and for my situation it fit, but I definitely want to put it out there....some people don't want to take on debt, and I can respect that.

    -t
     
  8. Psychbound

    Psychbound

    6
    0
    Mar 27, 2007
    You all have been really helpful...thank you so much for responding. I am not interested in teaching, or much research--much more interested in clinical work which is why I chose the PsyD. I just wanted to get your advice on whether or not going to a school of professional psychology had negative implications---because I keep getting mixed responses. Thank you all for your guidance :)
     
  9. LadyInRed

    LadyInRed 2+ Year Member

    72
    0
    Feb 13, 2007
    Psychbound, unfortunately you won't get a consensus on this forum about whether going to a professional psychology program has negative implications. You mentioned that you've gotten mixed responses in the past, and the same is true here - there are greatly varying views on the subject. If you do want to hear others opinions about a professional psychology program, I'd suggest you search some of the older threads where it has been discussed in depth. Good luck!
     
  10. Therapist4Chnge

    Therapist4Chnge Neuropsych Ninja Faculty Faculty Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    21,184
    2,063
    Oct 6, 2006
    The Beach
    Agreed.

    I think an important point to make....you can get very good clinical training at a professional/traditional school, it all depends on the specific program and/or with whom you work with.

    As for GW....I looked at the program 4 years ago, and I thought it was pretty decent, but it didn't make my list because of the location (I was from the area, and I wasn't a fan of DC)

    -t
     
  11. LadyInRed

    LadyInRed 2+ Year Member

    72
    0
    Feb 13, 2007
    Don't mind Therapist4Chnge...DC is awesome! ;)
     
  12. Therapist4Chnge

    Therapist4Chnge Neuropsych Ninja Faculty Faculty Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    21,184
    2,063
    Oct 6, 2006
    The Beach
    :laugh:

    DC can be a great place to go to school, and many people love it.....just not me. ;)

    -t
     
  13. NeuroPsyStudent

    NeuroPsyStudent 2+ Year Member

    82
    0
    Feb 5, 2007
    DC is a great place to study. Regardless of your program you can take classes through the Washington Area Consortium (George Washington, Georgetown, AU, U. of MD, George Mason, American, Catholic U.). And with the amazing hospitals/NIH and the outstanding clinicians here, so much beyond your program is possible. You do need to be independently motivated, however, and if you plan to take advantage of a variety of training possibilities, you will need a car.
     
  14. sunkyst11

    sunkyst11 2+ Year Member

    18
    0
    Mar 12, 2007
    i know several graduates of the gwu psyd program who are all excellent clinicians and really enjoyed their experiences.
     

Share This Page