Psych Employment

Discussion in 'Psychiatry' started by Niko, Mar 24, 2004.

  1. Niko

    Niko Junior Member
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    I've heard a lot about all of the psychiatry employment opportunities out there, but I was wondering whether it depends on how prestigious a program you come out of. I'll be starting my residency at a smaller university program this year (only 6 residents/year), and hope that it won't hurt my chances of getting a good job in the future. Appreciate all replies
     
  2. Big Lebowski

    Big Lebowski Senior Member
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    A lot depends on what kind of career you would like to have and where you would like to practice. The field, in general, is pretty wide open and there are TONS of jobs out there. To generalize, as you get to the coasts you find the areas are more saturated with psychiatrists. Same goes for bigger cities. But there are still jobs in these areas, you just need to find them and use the right network. If you are planning on practicing in the midwest, for example, perhaps in a medium size city, you will have no problems. However, if you want to be on faculty at UCSF, then there might be a problem. It also helps to train in the state you are interested in practicing in secondary to the benefits of networking. Most states have societies and you'll likely have opportunities to get involved on the state level and make contacts.

    You'll need to consider what type of practice you want. If you are interested in an academic career, then you'll need to demonstrate to academic institutions that you will be able to "support your job." By this I mean you'll need to show them you can generate money. This is where it could get sticky. I don't know which program you are at, but a lot of smaller programs do not have as many research opportunities especially if they are not associated with a large academic center. The academic world is also very political and networking is key for finding employment. If you are interested in a clinical practice, then things get much easier and most smaller programs are geared towards training clinical psychiatrists.

    Hope that helps...
     
  3. Wide open. Where do you want to live Beach or mtns.

    Pay poor. Job boring. Many physicians talking of going back to another field. Best psychiartist here is now an ENT man.

    One moved to Hawaii. 50% foreign schooled. There are OK.

    Most live off of Medicare. Very few take Medical. A lot of Clinics.

    No way one could do this work for 30 years.

    Not like you are reading about the field.

    IMO Pick this field but add to your knowledge in another. GP's have stopped giving SSRI to an extent as they are afraid of new research--that's good news for you.
     
  4. hurt

    hurt Nor Cal Psych R2
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    You are sounding a bit trollish Allred. This information may apply to PSYCHOLOGISTS (like you), where there is a huge over supply due the the diploma mills that pump out the psyD degree, but this does not accurately portray the career outlook for psychiatry. IMG/FMG's are getting pushed into other specialties like FP now, due to the recent increased interest in psychiatry by American trained physicians. This is a breath of fresh air in my opinion. Physicians are choosing psychiatry now because they enjoy the field or desire a good lifestyle, not because it is the only specialy that will accept them. If you actually knew the facts about psychiatry, you would know that psychiatry is the specialty that is chosen most often, when physicians change specialties. I am starting residency at a UC program in California in June, and the residents that finish this program each have 8-10 excellent job offers upon graduation from the program. If one chooses to do a child fellowship, then the opportunities are even better. Allred, if you plan to give advice, you should go to the PSYCHOLOGY forum and talk about YOUR field. Don't come here to spread your poison!
     
  5. I work in a large, private psychiatric clinic in Los Angeles for 25 years. All my collegues were MD's. And there was no conflict between the group. psychiatrists would not stay on that issue for that long of time.

    Would you say that to Kay Redfield Jamison, a school mate of mine.

    What I said is true for Los Angeles only.

    Show me any post with "hate."

    I am 61 and normal, beyond your point. The last time I had angry fellings towards a human was 20 years ago. You learn that skill, maybe.

    But good point, I will leave this BB.
     
  6. hurt

    hurt Nor Cal Psych R2
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    Hate is your word sir, not mine. Your misinformation and baneful influence is what I am talking about. Do your colleagues know that you consider their work boring? Why don't you send the group an e-mail expressing this opinion? Perhaps you are bored and need to get out of this profession. I am passionate about psychiatry and mental health in general. I want to help improve the profession, not tear is down. There is plenty of stigmatization about psychiatry from lay people as well as other health professionals. We don't need it from those WITHIN the mental health profession
     
  7. PsychNOS

    PsychNOS Member
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    I don't know where this guy practices, but I've heard and seen the contrary about L.A. Apparently there are plenty of patients and setting up a solo private practice can be very lucrative (>200K in about 1-2 years time). I think that how much money that you make has something to do with your buisness acumen. That being said, nobody went into psychiatry to make bank.
     
  8. Anasazi23

    Anasazi23 Your Digital Ruler
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    To hurt: :clap:

    I was a psychology Ph.D. grad student who will be starting my psychiatry residency this summer. There is a HUGE difference between the fields. Basically, I left psychology because the thought of therapy and testing for the rest of my life (not to mention the fraction of pay) made me ill.


    Psychiatry is an incredibly fulfilling, complex, and rewarding field. If you choose to make it "hum-drum," then that is your own fault. In fact, I argue that no field, professionally, scientifically, or clinically, is as interesting as psychiatry.

    Just my .02
     
  9. mdblue

    mdblue Senior Member
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    :thumbup:
    Do agree w/ the above posts. It all depends on you. The golden years of 70's and 80's are not coming back for docs, but now there is a better understanding of the psychopathology and tx options. Also from what I've seen, few non-medical psychologists/other mental health professionals seem to have problems adjusting w/ the psychiatrists role as a team leader, more so if he/she is a non-white FMG. It has to do w/ their own insecurity and does not accurately reflect the state of contemporary psychiatry.
     

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