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PT's ranked highly! Over doctors!

Discussion in 'Physical Therapy' started by whitethunder10, Apr 21, 2007.

  1. whitethunder10

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    Money really can't buy happiness, study finds
    Clergy are the most satisfied with their jobs; lawyers, doctors down on the list

    By Barbara Rose
    Tribune staff reporter
    Published April 17, 2007

    The old saw "money can't buy happiness" apparently holds true when it comes to work.

    Highly-paid professionals like doctors and lawyers didn't make the cut when researchers set out to find the most satisfied workers.

    Clergy ranked tops in both job satisfaction and general happiness, according to the National Opinion Research Center at the University of Chicago.

    Physical therapists and firefighters were second- and third-ranked in job satisfaction, with more than three-quarters reporting being "very satisfied."

    Other occupations in which more than 60 percent said they were very satisfied included teachers, painters and sculptors, psychologists and authors.

    "The most satisfying jobs are mostly professions, especially those involving caring for, teaching and protecting others and creative pursuits," said Tom W. Smith, director of NORC's General Social Survey, a poll supported by the National Science Foundation.

    The worker satisfaction study, set for release Tuesday, is based on data collected since 1988 on more than 27,500 randomly selected people.

    For the most satisfied workers, intrinsic rewards are key, the study suggests.

    "They're doing work they're very proud of, helping people," Smith said.

    Clergy ranked by far the most satisfied and the most generally happy of 198 occupations.

    Eighty-seven percent of clergy said they were "very satisfied" with their work, compared with an average 47 percent for all workers. Sixty-seven percent reported being "very happy," compared with an average 33 percent for all workers.

    Jackson Carroll, Williams professor emeritus of religion and society at Duke Divinity School, found similarly high satisfaction when he studied Protestant and Catholic clergy, despite relatively modest salaries and long hours.

    "They look at their occupation as a calling," Carroll said. "A pastor does get called on to enter into some of the deepest moments of a person's life, celebrating a birth and sitting with people at times of illness or death. There's a lot of fulfillment."

    Others in helping professions describe their work as a calling.

    "I believe I was probably put on this earth to make someone's life a little easier, that's what I get out of my job," said Gina Kolk, an Oak Park physical therapist who has practiced 23 years. "I love my job. I think it's because I see results very quickly. I see positive things happen to people very quickly. I get rewarded every day by what I do."

    Satisfaction generally rises with social status, and higher status often goes hand in hand with higher pay, Smith said. An exception is doctors, a high-paying profession that ranked No. 1 in occupational prestige. General practitioners earn more than twice as much as physical therapists, for instance, averaging $140,370 annually compared with $65,350, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Yet doctors scored lower in satisfaction and happiness.

    Peter Eupierre, 55, an internal medicine physician who practices in Melrose Park, had eight patients in his waiting room and three in examining rooms Tuesday afternoon.

    "I think most doctors are satisfied; the problem is we have so much pressure," he said. "The demand for time is such, we are always behind and sometimes it can be pretty stressful.

    "When someone comes in ill and you're able to restore them to health, there's nothing greater than that. [But] there are so many regulations, it's not like it used to be. The demands outside the actual patient care are much greater than they used to be."

    Occupations with the least satisfied and happy workers tended to be low-skill manual and service jobs, Smith found.

    Roofers, waiters and laborers ranked at the bottom in job satisfaction, with as few as one in five reporting they were very satisfied.

    Bartenders, known for listening to other people's troubles, apparently need sympathetic ears: Only 26 percent said they were very satisfied.

    ---

    TOP OCCUPATIONS IN JOB SATISFACTION

    1. Clergy

    2. Physical therapists

    3. Firefighters

    4. Education administrators

    5. Painters, sculptors

    BOTTOM OCCUPATIONS IN JOB SATISFACTION

    1. Roofers

    2. Waiters, servers

    3. Laborers (not construction)

    4. Bartenders

    5. Hand packers and packagers
     
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  3. Cyrus44

    Cyrus44 Junior Member
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    When i asked PTs why they enjoy the profession they tell me that they dont have on call hours and can have a easy family life. Yeh they complain about the pay, but they seem to always feel good about about having alot of free time. I would think firefighters would be highly stressful, even more than a doctors by far. Not only could the civilian die in the fire, but the firefighter could too.
     
  4. Grue1some

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    There is good and bad in every profession. People earn degrees that they do not even use. People quit a job due to not having heart for it. Money is one thing, but what makes you happy at the end counts more than money.
     
  5. whitethunder10

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    I wonder when the actually study is going to come out so we can see the entire list of professions ranked...

    This is exactly why I was thinking PT would be something I would like. I jsut felt that vibe about it. I have had "prestigous jobs" and even though they paid well I hated them. I couldn;t stay at one for more that 2 months!

    People do seem to think that the pay isnt good enough for PT (based on the reviews I read on here), but what is pay? It is something to make your life better, right? I think there is a limit though - the law of diminishing returns.

    I think that PT just happens to be right at the sweet spot. Although making $400,000 per year is probably really nice too.. LOL

    If someone gets the actual study in their hands can they post it on here?

    Thanks
     
  6. whitethunder10

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    the funny thing is that www.usnews.com reports opposite findings fo teachers and psychologists... I would put my money on the University of Chicago findingss though...
     
  7. DocWagner

    DocWagner Senior Member
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    Hey...absolutely, life was alot easier when I was a PT. It is a good gig, no late hours, generally no weekends and no nights.

    THere should be absolutely no bitching regarding "work". Low acuity and a scheduled lunch!
     
  8. Cyrus44

    Cyrus44 Junior Member
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    and no beepers :love:
     
  9. matotom

    matotom Junior Member
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    PT would be absolutely perfect(in my mind) if not for the amount of time you have to spend with a single patient. 3 x a week for 4 weeks...with the same person...uggghhhh.

    If you dont mind that..the job itself is very easy and low pressure. Too bad reimbursement is trending down so quickly, which kills salaries.
     
  10. whitethunder10

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    what do you mean compensation is trending down? Is it staying about the same? And what happens if we get universal health care?
     
  11. Cyrus44

    Cyrus44 Junior Member
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    We're not the only ones getting hit by it, everyone is. Insurances are cutting back on reimbusement and charging people more which seems to be counterintuitive. At this tend everyone will be without insurance and unable to pay for any medical care.
     
  12. truthseeker

    truthseeker Senior Member
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    At some point, the healthcare industry decided to charge $25 for a $3 box of gauze. I know that my charges in my department are about 1/2 of what other area providers charge. It is insane that 15 minutes of ther ex should cost $50 let alone $70 which some places charge. I realize that we all have to make a living, and that the education of the patient in the proper exercisesor other hands on manual therapy are skilled services, but let's get real.

    I am not a fan of the way insurance companies practice, but you have to admit, as soon as the patient no longer had to shop for best/most efficient care, and didn't have to pay for services, the game was lost. If people had to pay out of pocket, the costs would go down and be more reasonable. No more $200 PT evaluation. Or maybe there would be, but they better be damn good.

    Soon people will be paying with chickens again.
    But then again, I won't have to buy chickens will I?
     
  13. helpfuldoc2b

    helpfuldoc2b Membership Revoked
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    Do you need an article posted by God knows who to make you feel comfortable to decide on a career, if you do, you will never be happy. The lists change every year, and look at #5, lol, painter?... I rather take the stress and pressure and be a doc or lawyer.
     
  14. whitethunder10

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    Why would you rather be a doc or lawyer? I'm trying to find out about pt.. not sure if that is what i'm going back to school for or not...
     
  15. delicatefade

    delicatefade ASA Member
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    Try doing inpatient neuro (SCI/TBI/CVA) rehab. 1 hour a day with each patient EVERY DAY. That's one of the reasons I got out.

     
  16. PT2MD

    PT2MD Hold my beer...
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    If you have great patients, spending an hour with them is energizing. If you have a couple of total freaks on your caseload, it makes you wish you had kept waiting tables. My favorite is the double kick to the nads when you treat a nut, then get to reinact the encounter on paper while doing your note...just venting there.
     
  17. Grue1some

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    Hah, I would just listen to the people that been through it. Every job has its plus and minus. Most past that stage and decided another route would be a better option.
     
  18. DocWagner

    DocWagner Senior Member
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    I may have not made this clear last time...but currently the time I spend with patients is just perfect. I think that hour long session made me numb and now it is just perfect.

    Notes for people thinking of switching to Medicine:

    DO IT NOW.


    THere is a national increase in spots in an effort to prevent a physician shortage, therefore many states have seen a 10% INCREASE in seats. Also, there are currently 2 or 3 new DO programs opening in the next year.
     
  19. tieu_tho16

    tieu_tho16 Junior Member
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    I am a pharmacy student and LOVE IT! There are many alternatives in pharmacy area. I do not have to work weekends or nights. No on calls, nada. just 40 hours and the pay is GREAT!
     
  20. Buckeye4life

    Buckeye4life DO, MPT
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    I personally do not find therapy that satisfying. In outpatient, after the first week, I get tired of talking about the weather or who your favorite american idol is. I don't even want to talk about the HA that is LBP. I'm just getting off an inpatient acute assignment, and basically hated every minute of it. One patient's family member told me he would walk the patient later, so could we just hold therapy today. Having people think that therapists just got their job by taking a weekend course really infuriates me. Also, never having a chart or having it ripped away from you because a doctor needs it immediately also was a big turn off. Yes, the hours are nice and there are moments when patients seemed very appreciative of what you do, but to me it's just a job. Done venting. Great job to all the people who can swallow their pride and have the personality that can really connect to people on a long term basis.
     
  21. truthseeker

    truthseeker Senior Member
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    Its too bad that you feel that way Buckeye. I find OP ortho very satisfying. Granted, I don't have orthos walking around every day and the family practice docs sort of come to me for their ortho evals that they don't feel are surgical or ask me if I think that they are surgical or not.

    I think it comes down to how you present yourself. When I first started at this rural hospital after working at a high octane suburban OP sports medicine practice, there was not even a charge for PT eval on the books, my predecessor did not dictate, and there were 6 chiropractors in my town of 5500.

    I started dicating the evaluations and biweekly progress notes and illustrated to the docs that I new my stuff, why I came to the conclusions etc . . .

    Basically tried to dazzle them so that they would defer the ortho cases to me rather than just medicating them which is what they were used to doing because the PT before graduated in 1967 and found a reason to massage and US every single diagnosis.

    Bottom line is you can make any profession whatever you want out of it. There are nurses that I want making decisions in lieu of the doctor's presence, and some I don't want to give me a Mantoux.

    You aren't given respect, you earn it.
     
  22. PT2MD

    PT2MD Hold my beer...
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    You really need to have a wide range of interpersonal skills to be successful in PT. There are a number of duds out there in PT, but a significant number of PT's are easy to be around. I think that's what draws them to the profession. Allopathic physicians often have a more narrow range of interpersonal skills (whether this is innate or aquired I have no idea).

    I have enjoyed the interaction of outpatient, but I could stand a little less of it now and then. Ergo - trying to move toward MD.
     
  23. Buckeye4life

    Buckeye4life DO, MPT
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  24. cutup

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    I honestly do not see the big deal with the money? I've read several posts and the pay seems to be an issue. I mean isn't working and making anything over 30.00 an hour pretty good? If you plan on buying a garage full of Lexus' and BMW's then I see the point, but come on.
     

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