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Publishing in a newsletter

Discussion in 'Student Research and Publishing' started by turkdlit, Feb 27, 2007.

  1. turkdlit

    turkdlit Superstar DJ
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    Hello, I have an abstract which will be the featured article in an online academic newsletter regarding neurology-psychiatry. It is a peer-reviewed, national newsletter published very 3 months, and is only available online.

    This was just a side-project of mine, but I wanted to get your thoughts on the following:
    1) Do I list this as a publication in my CV?
    2) Clearly this doesn't carry as much clout as getting a publication in a circulating journal, but how good will it look on my CV? Equivalent to a poster presentation, maybe?

    Its just that it seems like a weird mode of publishing and I want to gauge its usefulness...thanks!
     
  2. gbwillner

    gbwillner Pastafarian
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    1) you should- especially if you don't have other pubs
    2) you're probably on par with the poster at a national meeting. But what do you mean that it's peer reviewed? I really doubt it.
     
  3. OP
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    turkdlit

    turkdlit Superstar DJ
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    Well, in this case peer reviewed means the 3 editors of the newsletter review and consider work submitted for publication. So, you're right that its not peer-reviewed in the same rigirous way that most papers would go through in a normal journal...but it is reviewed and selected to some capacity.

    Thanks for your response.
     
  4. Circumflex

    Circumflex Junior Member
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    Every abstract helps - put it on your CV under "Abstracts." You can't compare it with a journal article. Use the data in that abstract in a poster presentation sometime - at school or a scientific meeting. Not that it makes that much of a difference, but everyone knows that posters are competitively peer-reviewed.
     
  5. gbwillner

    gbwillner Pastafarian
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    FYI- "peer" means other scientists. Usially experts in your specific field. So this in NOT peer reviewed.
     
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    turkdlit

    turkdlit Superstar DJ
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    The 3 editors are scientists, 2 PhD's and an MD at the same univeristy, and they are experts in the field (neuro-psych). They created this newsletter for students so they can have an outlet to get preliminary research out. They go over all submissions and select a few for publication similar to journals, so I believe this would be considered peer reviewed, albeit on a much smaller scale.

    Circumflex, thanks for the suggestion, I do plan on preparing a poster/oral presentation for the future. It seems it would be appropriate to list it under
    "abstracts" on my CV. Thanks to all for their responses!
     
  7. gbwillner

    gbwillner Pastafarian
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    Do you actually have an "abstracts" heading in your CV? After relevant academic information, I have a "competitive awards", "biographical sketch", "presentations" and "publications". This takes up roughly three pages.

    I'm just curious what other MD/PhDs do. I'm sure at some point it would have made sense to have an "abstracts" section, but after the PhD, most of that info would be redundant and not noteworthy (?).
     
  8. Circumflex

    Circumflex Junior Member
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    No - you are right. When I was in undergrad, one guy I worked with told me to label the section "Abstracts" - later (PhD portion) when I started presenting at meetings, I changed it to "Presentations." I also have the same other headings as you. I've seen many different styles/headings in CVs. It's also interesting that as I progress, I start leaving off certain things that I had earlier in my career. Like you said - certain things get less relevant as you go.
     
  9. gbwillner

    gbwillner Pastafarian
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    YUP, I now leave off anything pre-MSTP matriculation, except reference to my graduation and type of degree.
     

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