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pulley question

Discussion in 'MCAT Study Question Q&A' started by icecoldstar, Aug 7, 2011.

  1. icecoldstar

    icecoldstar ASA Member
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    Here is a pulley,

    [​IMG]

    each box is 10 kg. what's the tension the the string?
     
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  3. indianjatt

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  4. costales

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    Tension is the same throughout the same string, so all you need is look at one side. T = mg.
     
  5. salim271

    salim271 Patience is tough. :/
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    Yeah, best way to deal with tension is to put it into the simplest terms. Ignore the pulley and realized that this problem's answer would be the same as if the rope was hanging from the ceiling with only one 10kg weight. It wouldnt drop to the ground because the ceiling is holding it, and neither weight will drop to the ground here because they're holding each other perfectly balanced. The tension is the same too. Most tricky tension and spring problems change the way the rope is held or the spring is compressed, but the same fundamental rules apply no matter what.
     

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