quantum numbers

ds2012tg

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May 27, 2012
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    Can anybody help me with this? Why is the answer A? I don't get how the azimuthal number is 0. I thought it would be 1 because the valence electrons are in a p orbital.

    6) Which of the following is a possible set of quantum numbers [n,l,ml,ms] for a valence electron in bromine?
    A) [4,0,0,-1/2]
    B) [3,1,1,+1/2]
    C) [4,1,-2,+1/2]
    D) [3,2,-1,-1/2]


    thanks!!!
     

    Msmouth

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    Aug 13, 2010
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    1. Dental Student
      Can anybody help me with this? Why is the answer A? I don't get how the azimuthal number is 0. I thought it would be 1 because the valence electrons are in a p orbital.

      6) Which of the following is a possible set of quantum numbers [n,l,ml,ms] for a valence electron in bromine?
      A) [4,0,0,-1/2]
      B) [3,1,1,+1/2]
      C) [4,1,-2,+1/2]
      D) [3,2,-1,-1/2]


      thanks!!!

      Bromine is level 4 for s or p shell. So you have a choice between between A & C. For C if l=1 than you can only have values for ml = from -1 to 1.
      A works because if you have l=0, then ml only can = 0.

      Hope this helps!
       

      FeralisExtremum

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      May 17, 2008
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        Bromine is level 4 for s or p shell. So you have a choice between between A & C. For C if l=1 than you can only have values for ml = from -1 to 1.
        A works because if you have l=0, then ml only can = 0.

        Hope this helps!

        I'd like to expand on Msmouth's answer a bit. This does explain why C cannot be the answer via process of elimination, but I understand his confusion as well: looking at Bromine's position on the periodic table, it appears to him that it should lie within the p subshell, for which l = 1. He wants to know why it is possible for Bromine's valence electrons quantum number to have a value outside of that, in this case l = 0 which is the s subshell.

        Bromine itself isn't actually within the p subshell - rather, it has valence electrons available up to and in the p subshell. But remember that this question is asking potential quantum number for Bromine's valence electrons. That refers to all 7 of the electrons in Bromine's outer shell which includes the ones that are in the s subshell, hence why l=0 is valid in the answer.
         
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