Xbocker

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Are you considered a Doctor once you graduate before entering residency. Or do you have to complete residency before you earn the title doctor.
 

Mad Jack

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You are considered a doctor once you finish school, but cannot be licensed to practice independently until you complete an amount of GME that depends on what state you want to practice in. Even if you complete the minimum training requirements for licensure, most insurance will not let you bill if you are not board certified.

So you are a doctor at graduation, just not much of one.
 
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colbgw02

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You are considered a doctor once you finish school, but cannot be licensed to practice independently until you complete an amount of GME that depends on what state you want to practice in. Even if you complete the minimum training requirements for licensure, most insurance will not let you bill if you are not board certified.

So you are a doctor at graduation, just not much of one.
To clarify, one can typically bill as long as he/she is board eligible. Very few people finish residency as board certified nowadays, so there would be a lot of gnashing of teeth if those folks couldn't bill until they were.
 
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MSTPlease

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To clarify, one can typically bill as long as he/she is board eligible. Very few people finish residency as board certified nowadays, so there would be a lot of gnashing of teeth if those folks couldn't bill until they were.
Isn't the attending the one billing the insurance? Not the resident? (I mean from a "whose name is on the paper work" standpoint, not a "who actually fills out the paper work" standpoint)
 

colbgw02

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Isn't the attending the one billing the insurance? Not the resident? (I mean from a "whose name is on the paper work" standpoint, not a "who actually fills out the paper work" standpoint)
I think the confusion may arise from the sometimes cavalier use of the term "board-eligible". In general, this term is used to describe someone who is on schedule to become board certified, so it is often used in reference to residents in good standing and who - when applicable - have passed initial, in-residency board certification exams. My understanding, however, is that no one is technically board-eligible - at least from the perspective of a credentialing committee or insurance company - until residency is complete. To cite my own experience, I passed all of my board certification exams prior to completing residency, but my board certificate start date was 1 July 20XX. Why not the day of passage? Because I had to complete my residency successfully in order to qualify for certification. If I had been kicked out of residency in late June, then I don't think I could properly call myself board-certified or board-eligible, despite having passed the relevant exams.
 

Winged Scapula

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To further clarify, it is not necessarily true, although common, that you have to be Board Eligible to bill insurance. There are tons of physicians out there who never completed residency but have a medical license and are working at various positions throughout the country and successfully billing insurance. However it is becoming increasingly difficult to be able to do so without completion of residency.