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Question about Neonatology?

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Vox Animo

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I may be a little early in asking this. I am going to be an MSI student next year and am looking for information on neonatology. I have been working with children for 6 years and a camp for individuals with behavioral disorders and i love it more than anything. Because of this i was looking into peds, and form their found neonatology. I have already gotten info from neonatology.org but am looking for more info from someone in a residency or in a fellowship.

How competitive are the fellowships for neonatal?
What is a typical work week/month like?
What happens in a typical day?
What is what drew you too this field?
What types of procedures do u do?
Is it more stressful than most fields?
How can I get experience/research in this fields before MSI, or after?
What is a typical salary?

Thanx
 

Doc-Hollywood

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Vox Animo said:
I may be a little early in asking this. I am going to be an MSI student next year and am looking for information on neonatology. I have been working with children for 6 years and a camp for individuals with behavioral disorders and i love it more than anything. Because of this i was looking into peds, and form their found neonatology. I have already gotten info from neonatology.org but am looking for more info from someone in a residency or in a fellowship.

How competitive are the fellowships for neonatal?
What is a typical work week/month like?
What happens in a typical day?
What is what drew you too this field?
What types of procedures do u do?
Is it more stressful than most fields?
How can I get experience/research in this fields before MSI, or after?
What is a typical salary?

Thanx


http://neonatology.net/
http://neonatology.net/career/default.html

then when you decide you want this as a career......go here http://neonate.net/ ;)
 

ThisIsYourLife

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im glad someone else on here wants to do neonatology as well. :D

obviously, that is what i want to do. :)
 
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I am only a 4th year med student who rotated through the NICU this year, so my thoughts maybe are not the most accurate, but they will give you a general idea nonetheless.


How competitive are the fellowships for neonatal? NICU is a fellowships in peds that has among the most positions per year. Therefore, getting any fellowship is relatively easy as long as you do well in residency from an average program. To get a fellowship at one of the best programs in the country is attainable but much more difficult, and if you want to be at a top-tier program (the top 10 in child magazine include CHOP, Rainbow Babies, Emory, Riley in Indianapolis, Baylor, Boston Children's, Milwaukee, Denver, Columbia, and USC) then you it would behoove you to go to a very good residency program and work hard.

What is a typical work week/month like? This depends if you are private or academics. In private practice, typically you are on service in the NICU several months a year and have pretty frequent call, unless you are in a very big practice. Academics tends to be better lifestyle with being on service in the unit 4-8 months per year with research time the other months and taking overnight call less frequently.

What happens in a typical day? The typical day again depends on how acute of a NICU you work in. In a level III NICU you will have the sickest babies and have a lot more issues to deal with since the babies typically are less stable and have more complex issues such as severe prematurity (eg, 23-30 weeks), complex heart disease, necrotizing enterocolitis, diaphragmatic hernias, abdominal wall defects, neuro issues, etc. In a level II NICU, the kids generally are healthier and dealing with less severe issues like feeding and growing, mild prematurity (eg, 30-37 weeks), etc.

What types of procedures do u do? Placement of catheters in the umbilical veins and arteries, intubations, lumbar punctures, chest tube placement are the things I did as a student. There may be others as well.

Is it more stressful than most fields? It depends on how you look at it. Most of the attendings are pretty laid back and do not get too stressed out. I would say it is no more stressful than other peds specialties with pretty sick patients, such as PICU, heme-onc, cardiology, etc.

How can I get experience/research in this fields before MSI, or after? If you go to a medical school with a decent sized children's hospital, research will probably be going on in the NICU. If their are NICU fellows, there will definately be some sort of research going on. I would simply write an email to one of the attendings and introduce yourself and your interest in research. I am sure most of them would absolutely love an eager medical student to help out.

What is a typical salary? Very wide range depending on academics vs private practice. I believe www.salary.com will have information about the average salary of a neonatoligst in your desired geographical area.
 

oldbearprofessor

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scholes said:
What is a typical work week/month like? This depends if you are private or academics. In private practice, typically you are on service in the NICU several months a year and have pretty frequent call, unless you are in a very big practice. Academics tends to be better lifestyle with being on service in the unit 4-8 months per year with research time the other months and taking overnight call less frequently.

What types of procedures do u do? Placement of catheters in the umbilical veins and arteries, intubations, lumbar punctures, chest tube placement are the things I did as a student. There may be others as well.

You put in a UAC and placed a chest tube (you pushed through the chest wall.....) as a med student? I'm impressed. Chest tubes are uncommon these days and neonatal CT are not usually thought of as med student procedures :eek: Especially when you put the hemostat to the chest wall of a premie and feel the posterior ribs :rolleyes:

by the way, most private neos are "on service" more than "several months" a year, often they work by weeks, or multi-week, blocks of time. Academic neos vary by the amount of research (and research $$) they have from 2-8 months/year on service usually.

Regards

OBP
 
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14022

Well I guess our term "chest tube" may be different, since we had several kids with chest tubes during my NICU month (I put in two myself and assisted on another 2). The chest tubes our NICU uses are pigtail catheters put into the pleural space, not using the hemostat as I have seen in adult ICU's. Both kids I did it on had a pneumothorax. We put a needle into the plueral space, a guide wire through the needle, pulled the needle out, put the pigtail catheter over the guide wire and then pulled the guide wire out. Hooked the catheter up to that big chest tube tank thingy with the water in it. It was back in Sept so I cannot remember all the terminology.
 

oldbearprofessor

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scholes said:
Well I guess our term "chest tube" may be different, since we had several kids with chest tubes during my NICU month (I put in two myself and assisted on another 2). The chest tubes our NICU uses are pigtail catheters put into the pleural space, not using the hemostat as I have seen in adult ICU's. Both kids I did it on had a pneumothorax. We put a needle into the plueral space, a guide wire through the needle, pulled the needle out, put the pigtail catheter over the guide wire and then pulled the guide wire out. Hooked the catheter up to that big chest tube tank thingy with the water in it. It was back in Sept so I cannot remember all the terminology.

I'm still quite impressed they let a med student stick a needle in the chest of a baby....I'd be willing to bet they don't let most do that unless they show real interest ;)

By the way, back to the OP question(s), in terms of stress, as I've pointed out before, stress is definately an individual type thing. NOTHING stressed me out more in my residency than having to deal with an adolescent female with acute abdominal pain in the ER :scared: I would gladly see 10 kids with ear pain over that workup!! But, intubating a 800 g baby in the delivery room - no biggy once you know what you're doing. It's all what you're comfortable with, and the skills you develop.

Regards

OBP
 

kickazzz2000

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oldbearprofessor said:
NOTHING stressed me out more in my residency than having to deal with an adolescent female with acute abdominal pain in the ER :scared:


AMEN BROTHER! :thumbup:
 

Vox Animo

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Thanx for all the info
 
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