1. Dismiss Notice
  2. Download free Tapatalk for iPhone or Tapatalk for Android for your phone and follow the SDN forums with push notifications.
    Dismiss Notice

Question about Voltage in Ireland....

Discussion in 'UK & Ireland' started by benzylique, Jul 19, 2006.

  1. benzylique

    benzylique Member
    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2006
    Messages:
    73
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
    For any of you from canada.... goign to ireland!

    I will be going to ireland in the fall... and i have a laptop computer.. with i blieve 120v for voltage... I hear ireland has a voltage of 220v?? IS it possible to use my computer in ireland??

    Thanks a lot
     
  2. Note: SDN Members do not see this ad.

  3. dirtymac42

    dirtymac42 Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2005
    Messages:
    46
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    What kind of computer do you have? Best bet is to contact the manufacturer and ask if it is possible to purchase a power supply for use in Britain/Ireland.

    But, you can first check on the power supply itself, if it can be used in Ireland it'll say 120V-240V 50/60Hz. If not, don't risk that you'll get it over there and it'll explode on ya!

    If it can be used over there, just get a simple plug adapter that has an end like this . Don't bother with the expensive voltage adapters, they may not work with your computer anyway and are a bit bulky to be carrying around.

    Good luck.
     
  4. benzylique

    benzylique Member
    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2006
    Messages:
    73
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
    Thanks for the reply!

    Yeah i can't check my voltage on my comptuer since i don't have it yet... I plan to order it before i go to ireland!
    I plan on getting a dell....
    SHouldn't be much of a problem eh?
     
  5. dirtymac42

    dirtymac42 Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2005
    Messages:
    46
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    There certainly are a lot of Dells in Ireland so i wouldn't worry. Have you priced it out in Euro as well? I assume it's cheaper to buy in Canada but you might want to look into service, ie, will your Canadian warranty allow you to take it to an Irish dealer? Just some things to consider....
     
  6. groupbstrep

    groupbstrep Junior Member
    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2006
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Most notebooks come with a converter already attached to the adapter (that large bulky rectangular thing somewhere along your adapter cord) because they realize that people with notebooks travel outside of North America :).. All you need is a plug adapter as your computer's converter will automatically step down the voltage for you. The one that Ireland uses is the same as the British plug.

    Ireland is 220V.
     
  7. Sage880

    Sage880 Senior Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2004
    Messages:
    838
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    Any modern electronics are fine. Certainly any new laptop works. You won't need a voltage converter - just a cheap adaptor that you can pick up at a electronics store or the airport.

    Recently though, they've stopped selling adaptors in Ireland that will take the two-pronged american plugs (the one's without the ground). They are more of a safety risk but it's really annoying to modify these things to take the two pronged ones as well. I think I might start up an internet business to do it!
     
  8. leorl

    Physician Moderator Emeritus Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2001
    Messages:
    5,559
    Likes Received:
    12
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    As sage said, with most modern electronics (especially laptops), you will not need a converter. They are made to be able to use any voltage/wattage in any country. Same with ipods, digital cameras, pda's, etc. Just make sure the plug says input: 100-240 V.
     
  9. misspiggy28

    misspiggy28 Junior Member
    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2006
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    hey guys,

    on the subject of computers, i thought i read somewhere a while ago that you have to be running XP professional to connect to the network (at trinity that is). can anyone confirm this?

    thanks!
     
  10. Yup, that's correct. You need XP Professional to connect your laptop to the wired or wireless networks in Trinity. You can get XP Pro with a student licence from micromail.com for about 100 euro.
     
  11. maillot jaune

    maillot jaune Junior Member
    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2006
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hey what's the wireless coverage like on TCD campus?
     
  12. Arb

    Arb Senior Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2004
    Messages:
    556
    Likes Received:
    4
    I take it the wireless connection is like most universities, ie. not secure with no encryption?
     
  13. leorl

    Physician Moderator Emeritus Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2001
    Messages:
    5,559
    Likes Received:
    12
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    not sure about encryption, but it's not steal-able anyway. Not really sure how useful wireless will be for you cuz at the moment, it's not really offered in that many places where you'll be spending a substantial amount of time. If you're living on campus, you might as well just hook through the cable. And for those wanting XP Pro why don't you borrow from a friend and save yourself the 100 bucks. I suppose i really shouldn't be advocating that.
     

Share This Page