question for NYU med students

Discussion in 'Internal Medicine and IM Subspecialties' started by NCBoy77, Mar 26, 2004.

  1. NCBoy77

    NCBoy77 New Member

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    Hi there. I'm a student at UNC undergrad and I have been accepted to UNC, Wake Forest, and NYU. I'm very interested and inclined to go to NYU. But for residency, I'm pretty sure I'd want to come back and settle down in the southeast. I was wondering if this is a problem for students from NYU to place well in the south. I know you do very well in the northeast. I'm asking because at teh other two schools I've been accepted at, they feel that it is more difficult for them to get a residency spot in a place like New York, unless they go to a lower tier program (at least from the perspective of the students I talked to). I'm posting this message in the medicine forum, since I'm 99% sure I'm going into medicine. Thanks for any information and congratulations to all of you.
     
  2. Kalel

    Kalel Membership Revoked
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    I'm not a NYU student, but I can tell you that NYU students do fine when it comes to matching in the south-east (ie there is no north-east coast biasness amongst academic programs in the south east). In general, programs of comparable caliber are easier to match into if they are not in the north-east (particularly NYC) or in California, because many med students end up applying to these two regions and want to live there during residency.
     
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  3. Renovar

    Renovar Senior Member
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    All 3 schools are quite good. UNC med school probably does best out of the 3 schools in terms of placing their grads nationally, IMHO. NYU obviously has its perks in NYC. The bottom line is, (assuming you are NC resident) why shell out to go to a much more expensive school? UNC is probably close to as good and cheap a state med school as they come.

    As far as biases are concerned, I do think that there is a south -> east coast/west coast bias. Similar bias exist somewhat among the best of south and west coast as well. But as Kalel said, East coast major cities and west coast are residency hotspots now, and everyone wants to go to one of either of those places for residency so it may be a distinct advantage if you want to stay at the coasts to do med school at that particular coast.

    But the thing about IM is that it's very wide open, and any of these biases can be easily overcome with good credentials.
     
  4. NCBoy77

    NCBoy77 New Member

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    Hey there,

    Thanks so much for your reply. UNC is definitely a great school, it's just that I was thinking it'd be nice to spend some time in New York, if only for a short while.

    We'll see what happens. Still have one more month to decide.
     
  5. nymed32

    nymed32 Member
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    Hi,

    I'm an NYU student and I can tell you from my own experience that getting interviews in the south was not much of a problem. I got interviewed everywhere I wanted except Duke and ended up matching at my top choice, UVA. I don't think there's any bias against us being from the north (though I do think the reverse occurs)

    In terms of our match list this year, I matched at UVA and another person matched in Miami. That was it as far as people coming south of the mason-dixon line for IM. That, however, is a reflection of the preferences of NYU students. It is remarkable how they apply to the Northeast, Midwest, and California and entirely skip the programs in the Southeast, even though all of the programs there are very good. (in particular a lot of them go to Georgetown and GW and won't travel two hours more to look at UVA) That being said, though, I'm sure that any one of our good students would have gotten interviews whereever they wanted in the southeast.

    The other thing is none of the students here have much knowledge about the southern programs. Two programs I would have applied to, could I do it over again, would be UNC and UAB; however I really didn't know much about either of these programs until I started interviewing in the south and talked to other interviewees. Of course, the faculty advisors will all tell you that programs like vanderbilt, UNC, UVA, etc are all very good, but you won't be able to get a student's perspective, since we really don't send students to the south. For instance, if you wanted to know whether our graduates were happy at a place like Vanderbilt, nobody will really be able to answer that question for you. If you wanted to know the same about Cornell, Sinai, Columbia, etc, then the advisor's here can set you up with a number of contacts.

    One more thing to note is that city life is not for everybody. Most of the students at NYU can't leave a big city, but I ended up getting sick of it and wanting more of a smaller town to live in. Keep that in mind--living in NYC is definitely different from living in suburbia.

    Hope that answers your question.
     
  6. lurkerboy

    lurkerboy exhalted mystic ruler
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    I agree with NYMed. I am also a NYU student and I know that we get a warm reception pretty much anywhere we interview. Many programs outside the northeast might ask why we'd want to leave NYC but once they realize we're serious about relocating, programs seek individuals who've done training in the big cities.

    I would also echo his second point. Our faculty are 90% trained from NYC or Boston so keep that in mind. It doesn't lead to a bias (they've been supportive of wherever we want to go) but they simply are less familiar with all but the larger southern programs.



     

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