purplecricket

7+ Year Member
May 13, 2010
299
294
South Carolina
Status
Medical Student
So I've been on here today searching for a while and couldn't find the exact answer to my question, I apologize in advance if this is asked a lot! :oops:

My first question is about retakes. I took two bio classes, one in the fall semester of my freshman year, and one in the fall of my sophomore year and made C's in both of them. I retook them over the summer and got A's in both classes. Because these were the exact same classes with the same credit hours, the fact that it was taken in the summer won't matter right? These A's will still replace the C's?

My second question is about what's counted in the science gpa. I've taken a lot of neuroscience courses, and I was wondering if this is considered biology, I know that AMCAS does.

I understand that behavior might not count (I've taken two classes that were really just pure physiology but are called Brain and Behavior, but I doubt they'll count because of the "Behavior" title). I checked on the AACOMAS website and it has neurology under biology, so would it be fair for me to assume that neuroscience would be as well?

Thanks!
 

seap3

7+ Year Member
Jan 31, 2010
631
72
Midwest
Status
Attending Physician
It won't matter if you took the retakes in the summer - they will count.

As for the classification - I'm not sure without looking at the AACOMAS directions. If neuroscience isn't specifically listed, but neurology is under BIO, I'd feel safe classifying it as BIO. They can always change it if they don't agree.

What department were the physiology/behavior courses under? I think that matters more than the title.

I think it's sometimes subjective. I had 2 classes that according to the directions should be non science because they were technically allied health - Human Diseases I and Human Diseases II. I classified them both as non science, but when I sent in my updated transcript with my summer Human Diseases II they changed it to a science. ??? Weird since Hum. Dis. I was still non-science.