RBT experience + Master's in ABA instead of post-bacc?

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that_sad_fish

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So I'm currently a senior finishing my undergraduate degree in psychology and am currently taking an seminar class on autism spectrum disorder that also covers career paths. I recently found out that my university has an accelerated (5-year) Psychology BS/Applied Behavioral Analysis MS program to which I can apply and complete my master's in 1 year after finishing my bachelor's. After getting a master's in ABA, I could do fieldwork, and after certification work as a BCBA and work with children (possibly in a clinical setting). While doing a master's I could also work as an RBT, who work under BCBAs, and require a high school diploma and 40 hrs. of training, where I can once again work one-on-one with children. I have most of my pre-med foundational courses completed but I was planning to do a DIY post-bacc to raise my GPA, but if I can complete a master's in a year that also allows me to work (help fund later education), I could do a short DIY post-bacc after my master's, and apply to medical school in ~3 years after graduating.

This is all just a rough idea, but my main question was whether this education and experience path (e.g., working in ASD clinics with patients) could be meaningful in applying to medical school. After learning more about ASD and the need for improvement of facilities, I would love to be able to work that in towards my goal to med school if I can. I would also be planning to supplement my later post-bacc studies with other clinical experiences (phlebotomy, volunteering, etc).

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any real world experience is helpful and helps set you apart from other applicants. I think top of the criteria are your GPA and MCAT scores. I'm not familiar with the "DIY" post-back courses. 20 years ago, when I did my post-bac, I had to go back to a university.
 
any real world experience is helpful and helps set you apart from other applicants. I think top of the criteria are your GPA and MCAT scores. I'm not familiar with the "DIY" post-back courses. 20 years ago, when I did my post-bac, I had to go back to a university.

thank you! By DIY post-bacc, I mean after getting my bachelor's, I would enroll in a local state/community college as a non-degree seeking student and take upper level (biomedical) science classes. I'm currently sitting at a 3.25 cGPA, 3.40 AMCAS sGPA, and 3.41 AACOMAS sGPA, with a straight/slightly downward trend, so a master's in addition to taking post-bacc courses would help boost my GPA, considering I do well enough. I have also been studying for the MCAT and am shooting for >510.

I just wanted to make sure if the career route I mentioned earlier is just as good of a route as doing something more traditional (e.g., post bacc programs).
 
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thank you! By DIY post-bacc, I mean after getting my bachelor's, I would enroll in a local state/community college as a non-degree seeking student and take upper level (biomedical) science classes. I'm currently sitting at a 3.25 cGPA, 3.40 AMCAS sGPA, and 3.41 AACOMAS sGPA, with a straight/slightly downward trend, so a master's in addition to taking post-bacc courses would help boost my GPA, considering I do well enough.

I just wanted to make sure if the career route I mentioned earlier is just as good of a route as doing something more traditional (e.g., post bacc programs).
I did 1/2 DYI and 1/2 in post-bac program. Start out, I kept my full time job while taking pre-med req courses at community colleges. I did that for about 1/2 of my course load. I was able to get very good grades. Then I quit my job and went to a post-bac program at a state university. During my two years of post-bac, I had part time work at the school and a few hours working w/o pay for a doctor at the VA but most of my time was spent studying. My overal GPA and science GPA was about 3.8. I think the advantage of the post-bac program is the faculty. I was able to get research projects and good recs letter from them.
 
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I did 1/2 DYI and 1/2 in post-bac program. Start out, I kept my full time job while taking pre-med req courses at community colleges. I did that for about 1/2 of my course load. I was able to get very good grades. Then I quit my job and went to a post-bac program at a state university. During my two years of post-bac, I had part time work at the school and a few hours working w/o pay for a doctor at the VA but most of my time was spent studying. My overal GPA and science GPA was about 3.8. I think the advantage of the post-bac program is the faculty. I was able to get research projects and good recs letter from them.

Thank you for sharing, that's a really interesting route. I've heard many positives about formal post-bac programs, but I'm trying to avoid having to spend too much while working on the side. A DIY post-bacc would provide me with more flexibility and be much cheaper than many post-bacc programs. If other opportunities are available alongside post-bacc programs like you mentioned I would definitely consider them, but I think cost is my main constraint right now.
 
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