Jun 10, 2015
13
6
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
Hey guys! So I'm going to reapply for the 2016-2017 cycle. I applied for the 204-2015 cycle, hers the results:
Stats: 3.8, 38, Hispanic (Puerto Rican)

ECs:
Shadowing physician from around my college(Urgent Care)
Hospital volunteer
Tutoring both for the school
Youth tutoring/mentoring
nominal research ( one summer, oral and poster presentation) not a lot however
small club leadership

New ECs from this summer/senior year:
Org started with friends, deals with getting youth involved in volunteer activities.
Shadowed an Puerto Rican doctor (in Puerto Rico)
PBK

Eight schools:

Applied:
Columbia

Interviewed:
NYU
Mt. Sinai
UChicago
Upenn
Boston U
Stanford
Cornell

Accepted:

So obviously, I drank the URM kool aid too deeply, applied too top heavy, and didn't get in anywhere. Knowing that, i wanted advice on:

  1. Again, I'm admitting that I applied too top heavy. however, I think that 0/7 schools interviewed still makes me believe that my interview skills are suspect also. what are some things I can do in the next year-year and a half to really prepare me for the interviews? My university does have a career center, however I do not live near my university at all.
  2. I am getting a job in an unrelated field for the next two years, but what are someone there things that i can do to boost my chances? This need not only needed to be connected to medicine, one problem that occurred was I probably was too immature in the eyes of the adcom, is there anything in particular that you think i could do to prove my maturity?
  3. What should my list look like next time? Can I reapply to some of the schools(1 or 2) that I already interviewed at last time?
 

GrapesofRath

2+ Year Member
May 5, 2015
5,320
3,803
Status
Non-Student
Hey guys! So I'm going to reapply for the 2016-2017 cycle. I applied for the 204-2015 cycle, hers the results:
Stats: 3.8, 38, Hispanic (Puerto Rican)

ECs:
Shadowing physician from around my college(Urgent Care)
Hospital volunteer
Tutoring both for the school
Youth tutoring/mentoring
nominal research ( one summer, oral and poster presentation) not a lot however
small club leadership

New ECs from this summer/senior year:
Org started with friends, deals with getting youth involved in volunteer activities.
Shadowed an Puerto Rican doctor (in Puerto Rico)
PBK

Eight schools:

Applied:
Columbia

Interviewed:
NYU
Mt. Sinai
UChicago
Upenn
Boston U
Stanford
Cornell

Accepted:

So obviously, I drank the URM kool aid too deeply, applied too top heavy, and didn't get in anywhere. Knowing that, i wanted advice on:

  1. Again, I'm admitting that I applied too top heavy. however, I think that 0/7 schools interviewed still makes me believe that my interview skills are suspect also. what are some things I can do in the next year-year and a half to really prepare me for the interviews? My university does have a career center, however I do not live near my university at all.
  2. I am getting a job in an unrelated field for the next two years, but what are someone there things that i can do to boost my chances? This need not only needed to be connected to medicine, one problem that occurred was I probably was too immature in the eyes of the adcom, is there anything in particular that you think i could do to prove my maturity?
  3. What should my list look like next time? Can I reapply to some of the schools(1 or 2) that I already interviewed at last time?
The bold is absolutely 100% your only problem. You got 7 II's from top 20 schools; everything else about your application is exceptional. There probably only a handful of candidates a year who get II's at 90% of the top schools they apply to. But it's readily apparent your interview skills are not up to par. And you can apply anywhere you want; if your interview skills are very weak it won' tmatter because you have to come across as a reasonably intelligent, motivated, competent person through your interviews to land an acceptance anywhere. None of this is to say you aren't any of these things but clearly the impression you are giving off about yourself, and how you are presenting yourself is not working at all.

And it makes sense how someone so strong can not get a single acceptance; nothing is a bigger turn off than a lack of maturity. How you present yourself, how you answer questions, your mannerisms and how you approach things is what needs to be revamped in your interviews. So to answer your question, practice, practice, practice is what makes the difference. Mock interviews are everything here. Get input from faculty members and professors you know. The harsher the better. Get a couple harsh professors and faculty to rip into you for a lack of professionalism, maturity and perspective and that can change your approach and seriousness real fast. If your issue really is coming across as immature, there is nothing better to address that than getting honest constructive and brutal feedback from people in position to give it.

You need to completely change your approach because clearly what you are saying and how you are acting in these interviews is giving off red flags. Use whatever resources you can. SDN has tons and tons of info about interview techniques and different people's experiences at specific schools. Research schools, research questions they like to ask and focus on, research everything you possibly can about each school you get a II. Beyond practicing with faculty and those who can give good feedback, practice to yourself. Repetition is key here. Prepare for as many types of questions as you can on common topics; ie questions about your research, your secondary essays, your volunteer experiences, your background etc. The more you do of this and the more cognisant you become of how you come across the better off you'll be. You need a plan for every single interview. What you want to focus on. How you want to come across. Be aware of how you come across through practice. Thorough preparation is a great way of quelling any sense of immaturity a person could get about you.

So if you want to improve your chances it comes down to one thing and one thing only; how you perform on the interview stage. If your activities were good enough to get all these II's I don't think there is anything in your app that can magically prove your more mature. It's all about the interview. Your list is almost irrelevant; if you can get II's at 90% of the top 20 schools you apply to, you can get II's almost anywhere. I would avoid the schools you already interviewed at. Considering you only applied to 8 schools that's hardly some limiting factor. Take the process more seriously next time around, work on addressing your weaknesses, and the cycle can turn out far more successful for you when you do apply again.
 

Gandyy

5+ Year Member
Aug 8, 2014
3,452
2,135
Status
Medical Student
The bold is absolutely 100% your only problem. You got 7 II's from top 20 schools; everything else about your application is exceptional. There probably only a handful of candidates a year who get II's at 90% of the top schools they apply to. But it's readily apparent your interview skills are not up to par. And you can apply anywhere you want; if your interview skills are very weak it won' tmatter because you have to come across as a reasonably intelligent, motivated, competent person through your interviews to land an acceptance anywhere. None of this is to say you aren't any of these things but clearly the impression you are giving off about yourself, and how you are presenting yourself is not working at all.

And it makes sense how someone so strong can not get a single acceptance; nothing is a bigger turn off than a lack of maturity. How you present yourself, how you answer questions, your mannerisms and how you approach things is what needs to be revamped in your interviews. So to answer your question, practice, practice, practice is what makes the difference. Mock interviews are everything here. Get input from faculty members and professors you know. The harsher the better. Get a couple harsh professors and faculty to rip into you for a lack of professionalism, maturity and perspective and that can change your approach and seriousness real fast. If your issue really is coming across as immature, there is nothing better to address that than getting honest constructive and brutal feedback from people in position to give it.

You need to completely change your approach because clearly what you are saying and how you are acting in these interviews is giving off red flags. Use whatever resources you can. SDN has tons and tons of info about interview techniques and different people's experiences at specific schools. Research schools, research questions they like to ask and focus on, research everything you possibly can about each school you get a II. Beyond practicing with faculty and those who can give good feedback, practice to yourself. Repetition is key here. Prepare for as many types of questions as you can on common topics; ie questions about your research, your secondary essays, your volunteer experiences, your background etc. The more you do of this and the more cognisant you become of how you come across the better off you'll be. You need a plan for every single interview. What you want to focus on. How you want to come across. Be aware of how you come across through practice. Thorough preparation is a great way of quelling any sense of immaturity a person could get about you.

So if you want to improve your chances it comes down to one thing and one thing only; how you perform on the interview stage. If your activities were good enough to get all these II's I don't think there is anything in your app that can magically prove your more mature. It's all about the interview. Your list is almost irrelevant; if you can get II's at 90% of the top 20 schools you apply to, you can get II's almost anywhere. I would avoid the schools you already interviewed at. Considering you only applied to 8 schools that's hardly some limiting factor. Take the process more seriously next time around, work on addressing your weaknesses, and the cycle can turn out far more successful for you when you do apply again.
This advice is spot on.

If you have 7 II's and you dont get in anywhere, you really need to work on your II skills and fast.
 
Last edited:

DrMidlife

has an opinion
10+ Year Member
Oct 30, 2006
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Yup.

I suggest finding at least one older, not particularly friendly, possibly British or classically educated, mainland science faculty member to mock interview you. Get the honest feedback, however painful, so that you know what you're doing that isn't working.

Friends, family and PR faculty can't help you. You need people who are seriously bitchy and abrupt about how you present yourself and communicate by the standards of major US cities. Or just go to UPR or Ponce.

Equally important, find the diversity offices for the schools where you interviewed, and get their assistance in getting feedback from your interviews. Even if you only get one out of seven to help you, that's pure gold.

If you want to be on the mainland, then I hope your new job is on the mainland, requiring constant communication with strangers (customers), such as sales or retail. That will polish you fast.

Best of luck to you.
 
OP
P
Jun 10, 2015
13
6
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
The bold is absolutely 100% your only problem. You got 7 II's from top 20 schools; everything else about your application is exceptional. There probably only a handful of candidates a year who get II's at 90% of the top schools they apply to. But it's readily apparent your interview skills are not up to par. And you can apply anywhere you want; if your interview skills are very weak it won' t matter because you have to come across as a reasonably intelligent, motivated, competent person through your interviews to land an acceptance anywhere. None of this is to say you aren't any of these things but clearly the impression you are giving off about yourself, and how you are presenting yourself is not working at all.

And it makes sense how someone so strong can not get a single acceptance; nothing is a bigger turn off than a lack of maturity. How you present yourself, how you answer questions, your mannerisms and how you approach things is what needs to be revamped in your interviews. So to answer your question, practice, practice, practice is what makes the difference. Mock interviews are everything here. Get input from faculty members and professors you know. The harsher the better. Get a couple harsh professors and faculty to rip into you for a lack of professionalism, maturity and perspective and that can change your approach and seriousness real fast. If your issue really is coming across as immature, there is nothing better to address that than getting honest constructive and brutal feedback from people in position to give it.

You need to completely change your approach because clearly what you are saying and how you are acting in these interviews is giving off red flags. Use whatever resources you can. SDN has tons and tons of info about interview techniques and different people's experiences at specific schools. Research schools, research questions they like to ask and focus on, research everything you possibly can about each school you get a II. Beyond practicing with faculty and those who can give good feedback, practice to yourself. Repetition is key here. Prepare for as many types of questions as you can on common topics; ie questions about your research, your secondary essays, your volunteer experiences, your background etc. The more you do of this and the more cognizant you become of how you come across the better off you'll be. You need a plan for every single interview. What you want to focus on. How you want to come across. Be aware of how you come across through practice. Thorough preparation is a great way of quelling any sense of immaturity a person could get about you.

So if you want to improve your chances it comes down to one thing and one thing only; how you perform on the interview stage. If your activities were good enough to get all these II's I don't think there is anything in your app that can magically prove your more mature. It's all about the interview. Your list is almost irrelevant; if you can get II's at 90% of the top 20 schools you apply to, you can get II's almost anywhere. I would avoid the schools you already interviewed at. Considering you only applied to 8 schools that's hardly some limiting factor. Take the process more seriously next time around, work on addressing your weaknesses, and the cycle can turn out far more successful for you when you do apply again.
Thank man, really appreciate it. I really got the hint at BU, my last interview. she was fixated that I didn't know how to drive, and didn't seem mature enough.Also, as I said, I don't really life close to my campus, and I don't think my parents are the best for the interview training(their English is not really good, also idk if they would be as harsh as you are suggesting), but there is a general career center near me, do you think I would be able to get help from there?

Next question; do you think I should change anything on my app for the reapp? I was think of rewriting my PS, and adding the extra activities, but is there anything else I should do?

Yup.

I suggest finding at least one older, not particularly friendly, possibly British or classically educated, mainland science faculty member to mock interview you. Get the honest feedback, however painful, so that you know what you're doing that isn't working.

Friends, family and PR faculty can't help you. You need people who are seriously bitchy and abrupt about how you present yourself and communicate by the standards of major US cities. Or just go to UPR or Ponce.

Equally important, find the diversity offices for the schools where you interviewed, and get their assistance in getting feedback from your interviews. Even if you only get one out of seven to help you, that's pure gold.

If you want to be on the mainland, then I hope your new job is on the mainland, requiring constant communication with strangers (customers), such as sales or retail. That will polish you fast.

Best of luck to you.
I don't really understand this post, I'm not sure if you actually understood the OP. I am Puerto Rican and was born in Puerto Rico, however I moved when I was 3 months old. so I went to school and lived on the "mainland" my whole life, and have not had a Puerto Rican professor my whole time at college, much less had one as an mentor. I don't plan on moving back to PR, and didn't apply to those schools as my Spanish wouldn't be up to par. I also asked the admissions offices of the schools I interviewed at, most have not replied yet and the one that did and said that they are unable to comment on my application.

Also, why mention particularly someone British?
 

GrapesofRath

2+ Year Member
May 5, 2015
5,320
3,803
Status
Non-Student
Thank man, really appreciate it. I really got the hint at BU, my last interview. she was fixated that I didn't know how to drive, and didn't seem mature enough.Also, as I said, I don't really life close to my campus, and I don't think my parents are the best for the interview training(their English is not really good, also idk if they would be as harsh as you are suggesting), but there is a general career center near me, do you think I would be able to get help from there?

Next question; do you think I should change anything on my app for the reapp? I was think of rewriting my PS, and adding the extra activities, but is there anything else I should do?
1) Like I said above your application on paper is completely fine. You don't get II's at 90% of the top 20 schools you apply to otherwise even with URM status. So no, I think adjusting your essays(particularly your secondaries) and adding new activities is really all you need for the paper part of things. Everything on your re-app will come down to the interview and how much you change your approach.
2) I second the advice to call every single school and do everything you can to get input from them. Many will just give you lip service ala "oh we have tons of very qualified applicants for very few spots" etc. But if you can get even one school to give legitimate advice and input such as "you didn't come across as focus or motivated in your interview" "your answers were all over the place" etc that'll be invaluable. Be persistent here; odds are you aren't going to apply to these eight schools again next cycle so do everything you can to get input from them you can use for other applications, no need to try to be on your guard.
3) Any faculty member you might know in a medical school near your campus you could try and practice with would be fantastic. Hell any professor you know, even if they are only science PhD's and doctors, that would give you a chance to practice could be helpful. If you cold email a bunch of physicians and try and shadow a few and get to meet them, practicing interviewing with them would be very helpful(especially if they have anything to do with medical school admission). The key is to get feedback; however harsh and unfair you might think it is. You gotta see other people's perspective on you, even if you don't think it is fair and prepare for everything.
 

Goro

7+ Year Member
Jun 10, 2010
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Status
Non-Student
If you can video your practice interview, you might be able to see where your rough spots are.

Take a look at Youtube for some medical school interviews and you'll find some really scary ones on what NOT to do!
Yup.

I suggest finding at least one older, not particularly friendly, possibly British or classically educated, mainland science faculty member to mock interview you. Get the honest feedback, however painful, so that you know what you're doing that isn't working.

Friends, family and PR faculty can't help you. You need people who are seriously bitchy and abrupt about how you present yourself and communicate by the standards of major US cities. Or just go to UPR or Ponce.

Equally important, find the diversity offices for the schools where you interviewed, and get their assistance in getting feedback from your interviews. Even if you only get one out of seven to help you, that's pure gold.

If you want to be on the mainland, then I hope your new job is on the mainland, requiring constant communication with strangers (customers), such as sales or retail. That will polish you fast.

Best of luck to you.
 
OP
P
Jun 10, 2015
13
6
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
1) Like I said above your application on paper is completely fine. You don't get II's at 90% of the top 20 schools you apply to otherwise even with URM status. So no, I think adjusting your essays(particularly your secondaries) and adding new activities is really all you need for the paper part of things. Everything on your re-app will come down to the interview and how much you change your approach.
2) I second the advice to call every single school and do everything you can to get input from them. Many will just give you lip service ala "oh we have tons of very qualified applicants for very few spots" etc. But if you can get even one school to give legitimate advice and input such as "you didn't come across as focus or motivated in your interview" "your answers were all over the place" etc that'll be invaluable. Be persistent here; odds are you aren't going to apply to these eight schools again next cycle so do everything you can to get input from them you can use for other applications, no need to try to be on your guard.
3) Any faculty member you might know in a medical school near your campus you could try and practice with would be fantastic. Hell any professor you know, even if they are only science PhD's and doctors, that would give you a chance to practice could be helpful. If you cold email a bunch of physicians and try and shadow a few and get to meet them, practicing interviewing with them would be very helpful(especially if they have anything to do with medical school admission). The key is to get feedback; however harsh and unfair you might think it is. You gotta see other people's perspective on you, even if you don't think it is fair and prepare for everything.
Alright, thanks for the advice. so I don't think I made it clear in my last post, but I actually emailed the schools, which is probably why I got such a low response rate. Also, do you think emailing random doctors is going to be fruitful? I guess I might as well, but do you have any other recommendations in case it doesn't work? Also, how much do you think i should tell them about my situation in my initial email? I don't want to turn anyone off with the reapp stigma.

Short term game plan:
1) CALL the other schools that didn't respond to my email, and

2) look up some doctors at institutions near me ( i live in a suburb of a city a good amount of med schools). try and email for shadowing.


It's the interview.
Thanks, was definitely looking forward to your ( or lizzym's) presence in the thread. You have any extra tips that can help with interview skills?

Also, forgot to mention in the OP, but my interview prep ( which obviously was trash) when like this:

I read post and watched videos online about the interview
read a book on med interviews
practiced with a friend(in retrospect, a mentor probably would have been a good idea.)
 

gyngyn

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The purpose of the interview (from our perspective ) is to confirm the presence of the skills and personal qualities that we do not teach in medical school and yet are crucial for the development of a physician. To the degree that you possess them and can convey it, you will be successful.
 
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GrapesofRath

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May 5, 2015
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Alright, thanks for the advice. so I don't think I made it clear in my last post, but I actually emailed the schools, which is probably why I got such a low response rate. Also, do you think emailing random doctors is going to be fruitful? I guess I might as well, but do you have any other recommendations in case it doesn't work? Also, how much do you think i should tell them about my situation in my initial email? I don't want to turn anyone off with the reapp stigma.

Short term game plan:
1) CALL the other schools that didn't respond to my email, and

2) look up some doctors at institutions near me ( i live in a suburb of a city a good amount of med schools). try and email for shadowing.

)
Emailing won't do jack-squat. You gotta actually call these schools and really try to do all you can to get them to give you feedback. You aren't going to re-apply to these schools anyway, don't be shy. And if they do give you input over the phone, don't be stupid enough to start arguing with them. Take whatever they say and be incredibly grateful for it, even if it comes across to you as unfair, harsh and ridiculous.

You want to practice with those who a) know what the hell they are talking about(ie faculty or people involved in med school admission not friends). b) can give legitimate feedback and provide you a different perspective. The harsher the better.

Try your pre-med adviser to see if they can give you input for interviews and if you can practice with them, although given the track record of many pre-med advisers and how clueless they are, this isn't what I would want to hedge everything on. If anybody who wrote you rec letters, even PhD's who have experience interviewing people, is wiling to do practice with you, take it. If any doctors you shadowed previously are willing to sit down and spend some time working with you on your interview technique, jump to them. Otherwise, honestly your best bet is just to start cold-emailing doctors. Talk about your interest you might have in their field and if you can shadow them.

What can happen from this is two things a) you get a better idea of what physicians do which helps you in interviews. Now that you have a better idea of what happens in an interview, this time when you shadow you can specifically look at things differently and notice things while shadowing that interest you or might be good things to bring up in an interview or help guide you in describing your passion for medicine. And b) By shadowing you can get to know them and explain your situation. Many doctors will be willing to try and help you out some way, be it directly working with you on your interviews or giving you contact info for people who can work with you and who know what they are talking about. Lots of doctors have connections or know people who work with admission in some way from my experience.

It may somewhat unrealistic in theory, but if you live in a city with a fairly large hospital and medical school, it really is not out of the realm of possibility at all a doctor you shadow whom you get to know either is a) involved in admission or b) knows someone involved in the process at some level who might be willing to meet with you and talk to you. Really, you have nothing to lose either way.
 

Stagg737

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So obviously, I drank the URM kool aid too deeply, applied too top heavy, and didn't get in anywhere. Knowing that, i wanted advice on:

  1. Again, I'm admitting that I applied too top heavy. however, I think that 0/7 schools interviewed still makes me believe that my interview skills are suspect also. what are some things I can do in the next year-year and a half to really prepare me for the interviews? My university does have a career center, however I do not live near my university at all.
  2. I am getting a job in an unrelated field for the next two years, but what are someone there things that i can do to boost my chances? This need not only needed to be connected to medicine, one problem that occurred was I probably was too immature in the eyes of the adcom, is there anything in particular that you think i could do to prove my maturity?
  3. What should my list look like next time? Can I reapply to some of the schools(1 or 2) that I already interviewed at last time?
In response to point 2, you don't need to do a ton more to boost your chances. If the job you're taking for the next few years does not involve medicine, then you may want to do some volunteer work that keeps you connected to healthcare. While you may be getting a job, it will be good to be able to say that it was just temporary and that your ultimate goal is still to become a physician. Staying connected to healthcare, in one form or another, is a good way to make that statement more convincing. Maturity is something that will come with experience, but is also something you can work on. When you fail or make a mistake, take some time to reflect and learn from the experience (such as this one!). Self-evaluation and personal growth are great ways to demonstrate maturity, or at least responsibility.

Thank man, really appreciate it. I really got the hint at BU, my last interview. she was fixated that I didn't know how to drive, and didn't seem mature enough.Also, as I said, I don't really life close to my campus, and I don't think my parents are the best for the interview training(their English is not really good, also idk if they would be as harsh as you are suggesting), but there is a general career center near me, do you think I would be able to get help from there?

Next question; do you think I should change anything on my app for the reapp? I was think of rewriting my PS, and adding the extra activities, but is there anything else I should do?


Also, why mention particularly someone British?
I think the career center will be able to help you with the professionalism portions of your interview such as mannerisms, language, posture, and overall tone as these are aspects that remain relatively consistent for most fields. As for the content, that will be something you will have to work on more individually as it is something that is more built around you and how you fit into what the schools are looking for. The career center should be able to help tell you if you're saying something really dumb, but in terms of the fine tuning it's all about practice.

I don't think you need to change anything in your app, just keep yourself busy and try to remain at least slightly connected to healthcare and I think you would be fine. I think Doktermom mentioned the British person assuming that a British individual in a position of professor or other high academic position will have a strong grasp of eloquent English and would be able to point out problems or nuances of your vernacular that others might not notice. Whether that's actually true or not, idk. However, it wouldn't hurt to find someone who is very well-spoken to sit down with you and critic how you speak in terms of your vocabulary and structure.
 
OP
P
Jun 10, 2015
13
6
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
Emailing won't do jack-squat. You gotta actually call these schools and really try to do all you can to get them to give you feedback. You aren't going to re-apply to these schools anyway, don't be shy. And if they do give you input over the phone, don't be stupid enough to start arguing with them. Take whatever they say and be incredibly grateful for it, even if it comes across to you as unfair, harsh and ridiculous.

You want to practice with those who a) know what the hell they are talking about(ie faculty or people involved in med school admission not friends). b) can give legitimate feedback and provide you a different perspective. The harsher the better.

Try your pre-med adviser to see if they can give you input for interviews and if you can practice with them, although given the track record of many pre-med advisers and how clueless they are, this isn't what I would want to hedge everything on. If anybody who wrote you rec letters, even PhD's who have experience interviewing people, is wiling to do practice with you, take it. If any doctors you shadowed previously are willing to sit down and spend some time working with you on your interview technique, jump to them. Otherwise, honestly your best bet is just to start cold-emailing doctors. Talk about your interest you might have in their field and if you can shadow them.

What can happen from this is two things a) you get a better idea of what physicians do which helps you in interviews. Now that you have a better idea of what happens in an interview, this time when you shadow you can specifically look at things differently and notice things while shadowing that interest you or might be good things to bring up in an interview or help guide you in describing your passion for medicine. And b) By shadowing you can get to know them and explain your situation. Many doctors will be willing to try and help you out some way, be it directly working with you on your interviews or giving you contact info for people who can work with you and who know what they are talking about. Lots of doctors have connections or know people who work with admission in some way from my experience.

It may somewhat unrealistic in theory, but if you live in a city with a fairly large hospital and medical school, it really is not out of the realm of possibility at all a doctor you shadow whom you get to know either is a) involved in admission or b) knows someone involved in the process at some level who might be willing to meet with you and talk to you. Really, you have nothing to lose either way.
Okay, called 3 of the schools so far. maybe I'm not persuasive, but every one of the schools I called went pretty much like this:

Me:hello, I wanted to inquire about the decision about my prior application.
Them: Are you complete/do your secondary etc?
Me: No, I mean about the decision last year.
Them: Oh, we don't give out that information, sorry.
Me: Okay, thanks for your time, bye.

So yeah, it's not getting anywhere. For some of the schools, I interviewed with the dean of admissions, so they gave me their contact info etc. do you think it would be proper to contact that individual directly? I don't want to put him/her on the spot.
 

gyngyn

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Okay, called 3 of the schools so far. maybe I'm not persuasive, but every one of the schools I called went pretty much like this:

Me:hello, I wanted to inquire about the decision about my prior application.
Them: Are you complete/do your secondary etc?
Me: No, I mean about the decision last year.
Them: Oh, we don't give out that information, sorry.
Me: Okay, thanks for your time, bye.

So yeah, it's not getting anywhere. For some of the schools, I interviewed with the dean of admissions, so they gave me their contact info etc. do you think it would be proper to contact that individual directly? I don't want to put him/her on the spot.
What have got to lose? The worst they can do is refuse.
 
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Hey guys, I'm back and getting my application ready for the this cycle. Here is the school list I decided to go with (if I have the funds) :

  1. Emory
  2. USC
  3. NW
  4. Rutgers
  5. Tulane
  6. UCLA
  7. UCSD
  8. Umich
  9. UPitt
  10. UVirginia
  11. Vandy
  12. Wake Forest

Two additional questions, other than general advice of list, plan of action etc.

  1. I'm assuming schools will know I'm a reapplicant, both from me telling them (if prompted) and my AAMC ID number. My question is, what should I tell them went wrong last cycle? Is the reply that I was a bad interviewer (along with improvements since then) a valid answer?
  2. I know you guys said not to change my application at all, but wont it look weird if I haven't updated it at all? I'm not reapplying to any schools, but just wanted to revisit the question.
What have got to lose? The worst they can do is refuse.
I ending up calling all of the schools ( other than Stanford) and they all said pretty much the same thing.
 

gyngyn

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Re-applicant prompts are an opportunity for you demonstrate several qualities we are looking for: self reflection, honesty and adaptability. Update your ap.
 

GrapesofRath

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Dont apply with the same essays and overall app that didnt work for you last cycle.

Your school list is largely irrelevant. Apply to your state schools and any top school you want. The Wake's and Tulane's of the world are a waste of time. You saw last cycle youll get IIs at the solid majority of top 20 you apply to. Those are the ones Id focus on as they are the ones with the scholarship money.

What matters for you is after you get the II and what you do at the interview. It takes alot for 7 schools to all turn away a URM with stats this high. Every school in America craves at the idea of obtaining a URM with stats this high. Something really had to have gone wrong in the interview if all 7 said no. Your cycle's success will be defined by how much youve improved your interview skills and approach. Frankly, the more you try using from your previous cycle in terms of interview answers, essays etc the more you are probably hurting yourself if you judge by how the results went.
 
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Dont apply with the same essays and overall app that didnt work for you last cycle.

Your school list is largely irrelevant. Apply to your state schools and any top school you want. The Wake's and Tulane's of the world are a waste of time. You saw last cycle youll get IIs at the solid majority of top 20 you apply to. Those are the ones Id focus on as they are the ones with the scholarship money.

What matters for you is after you get the II and what you do at the interview. It takes alot for 7 schools to all turn away a URM with stats this high. Every school in America craves at the idea of obtaining a URM with stats this high. Something really had to have gone wrong in the interview if all 7 said no. Your cycle's success will be defined by how much youve improved your interview skills and approach. Frankly, the more you try using from your previous cycle in terms of interview answers, essays etc the more you are probably hurting yourself if you judge by how the results went.
Re-applicant prompts are an opportunity for you demonstrate several qualities we are looking for: self reflection, honesty and adaptability. Update your ap.
Okay, I will update my application, and work on the PS/secondaries more. @GrapesofRath. I REALLY want to get into a school, and currently have learned my lesson in regards to applying to schools "out of my league". Do you (or @gyngyn) have any suggestions of additional schools to app to my list that will be more forgiving of someone in my situation? Also I forgot to mention; I did not take biochem.
 

y123

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You mentioned earlier that one interviewer mentioned you did not know how to drive. Did you get your driver's license? Some schools seem to care about it a lot.
 
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You mentioned earlier that one interviewer mentioned you did not know how to drive. Did you get your driver's license? Some schools seem to care about it a lot.
yes I did!


Submitted last week, my (semi-) final list is as follows

  1. Emory
  2. USC
  3. NW
  4. UCF
  5. Tulane - maybe
  6. UCLA
  7. UCSD
  8. Umich
  9. UPitt
  10. UVirginia
  11. Vandy
  12. UCinn
Any more advice/schools possibilities(eg. state schools that don't require biochem & accept OOS)? REALLY hoping to get in(I guess everyone is...). Also additional interview advice is appreciated.
 

gyngyn

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yes I did!


Submitted last week, my (semi-) final list is as follows

  1. Emory
  2. USC
  3. NW
  4. UCF
  5. Tulane - maybe
  6. UCLA
  7. UCSD
  8. Umich
  9. UPitt
  10. UVirginia
  11. Vandy
  12. UCinn
Any more advice/schools possibilities(eg. state schools that don't require biochem & accept OOS)? REALLY hoping to get in(I guess everyone is...). Also additional interview advice is appreciated.
How about the three Puerto Rican schools that consider mainlanders?
 

Faha

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You could try Einstein, Mount Sinai, Boston University, Tufts, Case Western, St. Louis, Georgetown, Miami. You could take Biochemistry at a local college this fall.
 

y123

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Add more top schools, especially the ones that you never applied.
Duke
Yale
Harvard
UCSF
WashU
 
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ConfusedChemist

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Thank man, really appreciate it. I really got the hint at BU, my last interview. she was fixated that I didn't know how to drive, and didn't seem mature enough.Also, as I said, I don't really life close to my campus, and I don't think my parents are the best for the interview training(their English is not really good, also idk if they would be as harsh as you are suggesting), but there is a general career center near me, do you think I would be able to get help from there?

Next question; do you think I should change anything on my app for the reapp? I was think of rewriting my PS, and adding the extra activities, but is there anything else I should do?



I don't really understand this post, I'm not sure if you actually understood the OP. I am Puerto Rican and was born in Puerto Rico, however I moved when I was 3 months old. so I went to school and lived on the "mainland" my whole life, and have not had a Puerto Rican professor my whole time at college, much less had one as an mentor. I don't plan on moving back to PR, and didn't apply to those schools as my Spanish wouldn't be up to par. I also asked the admissions offices of the schools I interviewed at, most have not replied yet and the one that did and said that they are unable to comment on my application.

Also, why mention particularly someone British?
If it needs updating, but I wouldn't change much in terms of activities you had last year. You'll want to change the PS though.

Your problem is 100% interview skills. The rest was clearly much better than probably most people who got accepted
 
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If it needs updating, but I wouldn't change much in terms of activities you had last year. You'll want to change the PS though.

Your problem is 100% interview skills. The rest was clearly much better than probably most people who got accepted
yea I changed the PS, in the process of writing my secondaries. I agree with the interview skill statement, if you have any help/resources to point me to, it will be appreciated.
How about the three Puerto Rican schools that consider mainlanders?
I'll look into it. Why two qualms about it is matching outside the island and my fluency in Spanish. I know Spanish (enough to talk to my parents close friends etc.) but idk if I could learn the whole med school curricula in Spanish.
You could try Einstein, Mount Sinai, Boston University, Tufts, Case Western, St. Louis, Georgetown, Miami. You could take Biochemistry at a local college this fall.
Einstein -biochem
Mount Sinai - applied already
Boston University -applied already
Tufts - low app/acceptance ratio, but may still apply
Case Western- biochem
St. Louis - will add, Thanks!
Georgetown - low app/acceptance ratio, but may still apply
Miami- biochem

And to the biochem statement; I would be open to it, however i may be in the process of switching jobs to a different area.
Add more top schools, especially the ones that you never applied.
Duke
Yale
Harvard
UCSF
WashU
So I have decided against adding reach schools this time around. I have limited funds (14-16 applications at most). So really just looking for the high yield options. Also, I think Yale, Duke and Harvard require biochem.

Thank you all for the advice! I think the problem with my list is not enough state schools, but I don't really know the ones that are OOS friendly. If any of you guys have any additional suggestions, let me know.
 

QofQuimica

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Dude, just take the biochem. You don't have to have completed the course prior to applying, just prior to matriculation. You could even take it online during the summer before you start med school.
 

GrapesofRath

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You're overthinking this.

1) As was said above Biochem is not something that is worth stressing this much about. Really, do what you can to try taking it at the cheapest local state U is fine. For most schools taking it at a CC will work. Honestly even taking it online on the side for you in this case is more than enough. You have a 3.8/38, you know you can handle taking one class on the side with whatever else you do this next year.

2) You got IIs at 90% of the top 20's you applied to last cycle. You didnt apply to top heavy, that's not your issue. You're making this school list stuff way too complicated. You are a URM with a 3.8/38. Top 20's(priority where you arent a reapp at) PR schools and other high stat schools(ie Emory CWRU etc) are where you should focus on. Take biochem this becomes much easier. They are the ones most likely to interview you and in the top school case give you $$$. Your list was not the issue last time.

Focus on the things that are important. For you, you had a glaring problem with your interviews. That's where you should be dedicating all your time and focus on because that's the only thing that's going to matter for you here, not worrying about how to overcome no biochem, school lists or how you "drank the URM kool aid last cycle".
 
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Dude, just take the biochem. You don't have to have completed the course prior to applying, just prior to matriculation. You could even take it online during the summer before you start med school.
yea I definitely want to take biochem, and am confident that I will do well enough, especially considering they will get the grade post acceptance. I just don't want to add an extra layer of variability. For one, I am currently in the process of switching jobs out of state, and idk if I will even stay at that job. If I am truly unable to take biochem, such as if its a 'pay rent or take biochem' situation, then I wont be able to got to school. So If I am taking biochem just to go to 'better' school and it isn't going to effect my overall acceptance chancing, I'm not sure if I want to risk it.
You're overthinking this.

1) As was said above Biochem is not something that is worth stressing this much about. Really, do what you can to try taking it at the cheapest local state U is fine. For most schools taking it at a CC will work. Honestly even taking it online on the side for you in this case is more than enough. You have a 3.8/38, you know you can handle taking one class on the side with whatever else you do this next year.

2) You got IIs at 90% of the top 20's you applied to last cycle. You didnt apply to top heavy, that's not your issue. You're making this school list stuff way too complicated. You are a URM with a 3.8/38. Top 20's(priority where you arent a reapp at) PR schools and other high stat schools(ie Emory CWRU etc) are where you should focus on. Take biochem this becomes much easier. They are the ones most likely to interview you and in the top school case give you $$$. Your list was not the issue last time.

Focus on the things that are important. For you, you had a glaring problem with your interviews. That's where you should be dedicating all your time and focus on because that's the only thing that's going to matter for you here, not worrying about how to overcome no biochem, school lists or how you "drank the URM kool aid last cycle".
As always Grapes thanks for the advice. But I'm not as certain that you are correct here. For one, I only applied to eight schools, so I don't know to what degree of confidence you can say that "90%". In addition, I don't think that I am the same applicant as just coming out of college; in fact I may be weaker. I work in an unrelated field, and did a volunteer work with my org, but I don't really compare to the peeps that do gap years at Peace Corps or something like that. Like I said, my mentality has completely changed, and I'm more focused on getting into really any solid school. The reason why I'm trying to target more state level schools is even though I really tried to get my interview skills up, I know that they are still not the best, and hope that other schools may be willing to forgo some small hiccups that elite school may not ignore. In addition, I am strapped for cash, and am not completely sure how I'm going to pay for all of my schools. So every school I apply to I really have to make sure I have a solid chance of getting in.
 

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:thumbup::thumbup::thumbup::highfive::highfive::highfive::clap::clap::clap::claps::claps::claps::banana::banana::banana::soexcited::soexcited::soexcited:

Now go read up on my post to "guide to medical student success".



Got accepted to two(!!) schools today. Just like to say thanks to all of you guys fro the advice, esp. @gyngyn and @GrapesofRath. I'm over the moon, definitely looking forward to attending med school.
 
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