hippocraticoath

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Why would you want to wait an extra year if you can avoid it? Retake the MCAT and reapply for 2011. Youre past MCAT will not really matter as long as you can do really well on the latest MCAT.
 

7wonders

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I have to disagree with Hippocraticoath. If you are just finishing your undergrad, I would recommend devoting your summer to MCAT study and delay taking it until August. That way you can focus on your current coursework (and maintain or improve your GPA) and still have 3 solid months to devote to the MCAT. You say that you weren't properly prepared for your previous attempts so don't make the same mistake again.

I don't see what's wrong with waiting a year to re-apply. It will give you time to get some professional experience, and maybe enjoy some free time and disposable income. Plus, if you're working in clinical or basic science research, your PIs will be able to write rec letters that will outshine those of most undergrad professors;)

Best of luck to you!
 

njbmd

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Why would you want to wait an extra year if you can avoid it? Retake the MCAT and reapply for 2011. Youre past MCAT will not really matter as long as you can do really well on the latest MCAT.
Not true, if those scores were released, they can be seen and will be evaluated by medical schools. Retakes on the MCAT (after one) are red flags. If the OP retakes the MCAT, those scores HAVE to be significantly higher (above 30). When we see high uGPA and low MCAT scores, we start considering "undergraduate grade inflation" which isn't good.

Past MCAT scores matter especially if they are very low.
 

canjosh

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Take an MCAT prep course if you can afford it. As 7wonders said, don't rush it.
 

futureIDdoc

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Make sure you are doing the things you stated above, retake the mcat during the summer, and apply this summer. Use personal statement to highlight what you are doing to improve your application
 
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GrieverX

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njbmd,

When you said "Retakes on the MCAT (after one) are red flags.", do you mean...

1.) Any retake at all is considered a red flag?
or
2.) More than one retake is considered a red flag?

Thanks
 
Mar 31, 2010
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cGPA: 3.67
sGPA: 3.52
MCAT:
1. 21Q
2. 19P
:( --> to all of the above
I know that I am an average student according to my GPA and my MCATs are HORRIBLE. I have never been much of a standardized test taker and I am one of those people who just needs to study a lot for everything. I barely studied for the MCAT the first time and rushed into the second take (basically had a panic attack during) because I wanted to make it into the 2010 cycle. Unfortunately I received that lower second score after sending in my AMCAS app (I was being unrealistically optimistic). Definitely the two biggest mistakes of my life.

So now I'm graduating and planning to take a year off and work as a research assistant or lab tech. I have good letters of recc, 2 summers of research both about 40hrs a week, 50+ hours of shadowing with 2 internal medicine resident teams, extracurriculars with several leadership positions since my freshman year, 100+ hours volunteering at a local hospital, 200+ hours of non-medically related volunteer work, 15-20 hours a week paid work on campus. I'm lacking in the volunteering/shadowing area and plan to do a lot more of both this summer and throughout my year off. I am also currently studying to take the MCAT in July. Also although I am a minority since I'm not a permanent resident or citizen I'm pretty sure that most schools won't consider me as a minority right? (even though I've been going to school in America since fresh yr in hs)

My main question is am I trying to rush things by applying for entry in Fall 2011 if I submit my apps early fall? Would it be better for me to submit my apps in the summer of 2011 and work on beefing it up throughout this year? What are my chances and how negatively will my prior MCAT scores affect me? Thanks in advance!
While your GPA is inline with what is average, and still relatively competitive for perhaps 1/3 of the available spots. Your MCAT is horrible and the fact that you plan to "rush" things is not in your best interest. You have more than you can handle and I'd personally recommend you take it easy.

Schools only consider MCAT scores written in a period of 5 years, after that, its up to the individual school to decide. Since you've score below 30 twice it doesn't do you justice. I'd recommend finding solutions that suit you to go beyond 30R.

While having a low MCAT isnt good, it doesnt necessarily mean its a bad thing, In Canada, where I'm from, alot of schools don't put much emphasis on the MCAT, McMasters only require a 9 on verbal reasoning, McGill or any Med Schools in Quebec doesn't require the MCAT for it's residents as of next year. In the US, I'm sure some schools will have less stringent MCAT rules.

In any case, take your time, I dont know why you want to rush thing, maybe because your intimidated by younger students or something? Just take your time to show your worth investing in.

My recommendation is to boost volunteering, clinical and shadowing experience and if possible, complete another degree in a pertinent field if worst comes to worst.

Remember that some Med School such as McMasters have a 3 shot rule, if you are rejected or inteviewed and rejected thrice, your not welcomed to apply there again. I have yet to apply, but if I where rejected even once, I would wait a few years before reapply.

What wrong with starting school at 30? most Masters students start at that age, and according to a study I read on medical students, forgot the name, students over the age of 25 still get accepted, abeit, at substantially lower rates than those who are 18-21, which is the ripe age.
But, age is not a factor, students aged 25 or older might not have the means or are burdened with more expectations than the younger folks.
 
Jul 28, 2009
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Take some time off and put your nose to the grindstone. You absolutely have to nail the MCAT the next time. Consider applying next year for the class of 2012 - that gives you a year to study for the MCAT in addition to volunteering and maybe working part time.

Also consider taking some upper level classes. I know that your GPA is fine, but the fact that you scored 19 and 21 on the MCAT shows that you may not have grasped the basic concepts that the exam was asking. You really need to figure if you're really bad at taking standardized exams, or if you just didn't understand the material. If it's the latter- which I suspect it is - you are going to need a lot more time to "relearn" everything.