strongyloides

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i'm only starting 2nd year and we haven't done renal or endocrine yet so forgive me if this sounds stupid.

How long it takes for your last drink of water to run through the body. ie, how long does it take (hours, days?) for water restriction to effect a response (aldosterone, renin) that inhibits further urinary excretion and retains water/sodium.

I guess the larger question here is what is the time-relationship between diminishing hydration and compensatory response?
 

pratik7

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strongyloides said:
i'm only starting 2nd year and we haven't done renal or endocrine yet so forgive me if this sounds stupid.

How long it takes for your last drink of water to run through the body. ie, how long does it take (hours, days?) for water restriction to effect a response (aldosterone, renin) that inhibits further urinary excretion and retains water/sodium.

I guess the larger question here is what is the time-relationship between diminishing hydration and compensatory response?
There are a lot of systems so it depends which one you are refering to. Most of them are usually pretty quick.
Example: drink 3 glasses of water or beers and see how long it takes for you to pee.
 
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strongyloides

strongyloides

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pratik7 said:
Example: drink 3 glasses of water or beers and see how long it takes for you to pee.
Problem is, you never know whether you're excreting the beers you drank then, or the ones you drank 5 hours before that. That's why I'm trying to figure out the science.

We know the pharmacokinetics for so many drugs, hard to believe we don't know exactly what happens to water.
 

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strongyloides said:
Problem is, you never know whether you're excreting the beers you drank then, or the ones you drank 5 hours before that. That's why I'm trying to figure out the science.

We know the pharmacokinetics for so many drugs, hard to believe we don't know exactly what happens to water.

Maintenance of total body osmols and total body water is a continual process. When you start becoming thirsty your compensatory mechanisms have already started kicking in...i.e. you're conserving salt and water before you even take a sip of water. It is possible to know how quickly water is absorbed and distributed within the body...physiologists use T20. The problem is that there are so many variables...is your stomach empty or full? are you dehydrated or well hydrated?

Referring to this post...the alcohol I drank 5 hrs ago is diluted within my TBW as is the beer I'm drinking right now. So it is the total alcohol within my body that is inhibiting ADH...it's not like each gram of alcohol is waiting in a single file line (first in first out) to be a) metabolized or b) block ADH effects.

Lastly, remember that you're not excreting beer, you're excreting urine. The alcohol and carbs are metabolized and filterable solutes are excreted.
 
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