hbyrne1206

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Feb 17, 2005
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Hi.

I'm wondering who here has research job or any job that will help boost your chances of getting into med school?

What do you do exactly? What were your qualifcations? If you don't mind, how much are you compensated for your work? How did you get the job?

Thanks for your time.
 

sidewalkman

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Jun 11, 2004
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I did a year of psych research (I guess it's 'basic' research) in undergrad, followed by my FT job in clinical research right now. At present I'm uncertain as to whether I'll keep pursuing the clinical route or go back to basic science, since both have their pros and cons. I'll PM you specifics.
 

Crake

I drive a Dodge Stratus!
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This is a good question, one I'm suprised isn't asked more often.

(1) I don't really think research boosts your chances of getting into medschool that much, by itself. However since you are competing against others who have done research (and it seems like virtually eveyone does some) it does help. However, good clinical volunteering is just as good as research really, IMO.

(2) Right now I work for a surgical resident doing statistics and database work; it's not very exciting, but I get to see some surgeries, get a good recommendation, and have the opportunity to get published. Even with all that, it's mostly paper work (someone has to do it, I guess)

(3) I started out doing research in the ER through a program at my school. One of the ER residents had set it up, recruiting maybe 20 postbaccs a semester to rotate through the ER, checking patient charts and looking for relevant research subjects for ongoing projects. This sounds a lot cooler than it actually was, because we couldn't interact with the patients and we just got in the way. Most of us quit, but we weren't paid anyway so it doesn't matter. Anyway, this is how you sorta start out--doing something lousy. Then I started my second research job.

(4) I found both through the post-bacc office at my school. I've found that researchers like working with postbaccs and will actively recruit us because we're, by and large, very reliable.

(5) I don't make any money yet, because I don't really have any marketable lab skills. Also, there's more postbaccs than paying research jobs, and many postbaccs already have significant research experience. I do know people who get paid (the average seems around $12/hr).

(6) My qualifications:
None
Last job I had was as a clerk in a grocery store. I have a B.A. in non-science fields (poli sci, history, german). Basically, I think it depends on your program too. I've heard that we have a reputation for being productive gunners. Researchers like this, so they're pro-active about recruitment (i.e. sending out emails). Therefore, I can freeload off the reputation of the program. This has been my strategy, and has worked pretty well so far.

Good luck.

p.s. Where are you doing your postbacc?
 
OP
H

hbyrne1206

Junior Member
10+ Year Member
Feb 17, 2005
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Crake said:
This is a good question, one I'm suprised isn't asked more often.

(1) I don't really think research boosts your chances of getting into medschool that much, by itself. However since you are competing against others who have done research (and it seems like virtually eveyone does some) it does help. However, good clinical volunteering is just as good as research really, IMO.

(2) Right now I work for a surgical resident doing statistics and database work; it's not very exciting, but I get to see some surgeries, get a good recommendation, and have the opportunity to get published. Even with all that, it's mostly paper work (someone has to do it, I guess)

(3) I started out doing research in the ER through a program at my school. One of the ER residents had set it up, recruiting maybe 20 postbaccs a semester to rotate through the ER, checking patient charts and looking for relevant research subjects for ongoing projects. This sounds a lot cooler than it actually was, because we couldn't interact with the patients and we just got in the way. Most of us quit, but we weren't paid anyway so it doesn't matter. Anyway, this is how you sorta start out--doing something lousy. Then I started my second research job.

(4) I found both through the post-bacc office at my school. I've found that researchers like working with postbaccs and will actively recruit us because we're, by and large, very reliable.

(5) I don't make any money yet, because I don't really have any marketable lab skills. Also, there's more postbaccs than paying research jobs, and many postbaccs already have significant research experience. I do know people who get paid (the average seems around $12/hr).

(6) My qualifications:
None
Last job I had was as a clerk in a grocery store. I have a B.A. in non-science fields (poli sci, history, german). Basically, I think it depends on your program too. I've heard that we have a reputation for being productive gunners. Researchers like this, so they're pro-active about recruitment (i.e. sending out emails). Therefore, I can freeload off the reputation of the program. This has been my strategy, and has worked pretty well so far.

Good luck.

p.s. Where are you doing your postbacc?
Thanks for the information, I appreciate it. And, I'll be doing my postbacc at Harvard Extension School (it's affordable and local ;) )
 

Crake

I drive a Dodge Stratus!
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Great program from what I hear. I wish I had gone there instead of Columbia. Good luck to you!