Resigning job to take 5 months off work before med school?

Dr.Meowz

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Dec 2, 2018
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Hi, I've worked over the past 7 years before finally getting accepted to med school.
But over the past 7 years, I've been burnt out beyond belief between working many 16 hour days as well as simultaneously studying for the mcat. I'm happy that I finally got in, but I have accumulated many physical health problems with chronic fatigue, acid reflux (that is very diagnosed severe gerd now), severe migraines, chronic pains everywhere, and a whole lot of other health problems from working myself to the death.
So for the first time in my life, I want to take a vacation as I've read and been told that this is my only chance to recover. Once med school starts, it'll be hell again. But I do have some savings so that's something.

I'm confused on getting healthcare without am employer. Navigating the insurance plans is confusing and I'm not even sure where to begin with this. I want to pay at most $100/month for individual healthcare. Is that possible?

Are there anything else I ought to watch out for when quitting a job to recover before med school?

Thanks
 
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Angus Avagadro

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I'm pretty sure the only health insurance available is on the Exchange and is high deductible and expensive. You might want to consider COBRA from your former employers health insurance. It's more expensive than what you were paying before, but in most cases better insurance, since you have ongoing health issues. Last I checked, you could do that for 18 months, but rules may have changed. You are probably over 26 and not able to get on your parents plan for a few months. Good luck and best wishes!
 

TragicalDrFaust

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You'll qualify for medicaid upon leaving the job and when you're in school. I don't care what anyone says; I refuse to pay $6k/a year using loans for insurance that still has a deductible and copays. I've worked and paid into the system and I will gladly continue do so when I'm a physician. But $24k off the principal of my student loans was the right choice for me.
 
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drstranger

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You'll qualify for medicaid upon leaving the job and when you're in school. I don't care what anyone says; I refuse to pay $6k/a year using loans for insurance that still has a deductible and copays. I've worked and paid into the system and I will gladly continue do so when I'm a physician. But $24k off the principal of my student loans was the right choice for me.
Depending on the state. This was my plan but living in a red state without expanded Medicaid I was SOL at least until wife and I have a kid
 
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AcesCracked

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You will probably have to pay more than that per month, but in general I would recommend taking a little time to relax before med school starts. It is tough as it is to adjust, and coming in already tired and burnt out will just make it harder. If you can afford it, do it.
 

8YearsLate

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You'll qualify for medicaid upon leaving the job and when you're in school. I don't care what anyone says; I refuse to pay $6k/a year using loans for insurance that still has a deductible and copays. I've worked and paid into the system and I will gladly continue do so when I'm a physician. But $24k off the principal of my student loans was the right choice for me.
Not necessarily. Medicaid eligibility depends on more than unemployment, especially if you terminated your own employment/insurance willingly. Look up the poverty threshold for your state for your family size. If your 2020 tax return shows less than that, you'll qualify. Otherwise consider the other insurance options others have suggested, and keep in mind that your work insurance will still be active until they formally terminate it (mine lasted 3 months after resigning when I was in this boat). Good luck, and good job recognizing that your body/mind/soul needs a recharge!
 

Doc_Ock

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The first two years of medical school are an enormously stressful grind. If possible yes. Your mental health will be far better going in as refreshed as possible.
 
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Hi, I've worked over the past 7 years before finally getting accepted to med school.
But over the past 7 years, I've been burnt out beyond belief between working many 16 hour days as well as simultaneously studying for the mcat. I'm happy that I finally got in, but I have accumulated many physical health problems with chronic fatigue, acid reflux (that is very diagnosed severe gerd now), severe migraines, chronic pains everywhere, and a whole lot of other health problems from working myself to the death.
So for the first time in my life, I want to take a vacation as I've read and been told that this is my only chance to recover. Once med school starts, it'll be hell again. But I do have some savings so that's something.

I'm confused on getting healthcare without am employer. Navigating the insurance plans is confusing and I'm not even sure where to begin with this. I want to pay at most $100/month for individual healthcare. Is that possible?

Are there anything else I ought to watch out for when quitting a job to recover before med school?

Thanks
I went straight from undergrad, to continuing to work 2 jobs 50+ hours a week while studying for the MCAT and EMT school, to MCAT during the first year of SMP courses that are MS1 courses, to this and my app cycle. You can bet I'm taking the summer break before matriculation. Pre-meds work a long straight track through to application and once med school starts, if we want to match into a competitive residency spot, we keep up the grind another 4 years.

It's been a hard year for everyone. I truly recommend taking the break. If you want to feel productive, learn a new language conversationally, take some cooking classes so you have recipes coming into school, read those books you've been putting off or watch the Netflix shows everyone else is hyping over. If you've had the vaccine and take every precaution, go visit family. It'll really be a time to invest in yourself before getting back on the grind.
 
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