Responsibilities of BSNs

Discussion in 'Clinicians [ RN / NP / PA ]' started by angelic02, Nov 8, 2002.

  1. angelic02

    angelic02 Senior Member

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    What differences in clinical duties do BSNs have over RNs without a BSN? Just curious.
     
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  3. Temple1st

    Temple1st Member

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  4. Noeljan

    Noeljan Senior Member

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    Hey
    I don't know of any clinical skills that limit ARN's over BSN's, but I do know of a few hospitals in my area that you can no longer move to Nurse II without your BSN. thats why so many floor nurses with their ARN's are also back in school for their BSN. Also, it is easier to move up and get into management with your BSN. Hope this helps
     
  5. tedsadoc2002

    tedsadoc2002 Senior Member

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    There is no difference in what you can do clinically (BSN or no BSN). In NY, where I had practiced for many years, the fact that you had the BSN was supposed to facilitate your getting into supervisory roles. I found that it didn't often hold true thoughout my years in practice (I had a BSN degree and was taking credits toward an MSN, extensive teaching experience, and seniority at the hospital and the unit in which I applied for the supervisory position. I was passed over for someone with an Associate degree. I had the appropriate amount of experience for the specialty unit and this woman did not. The administration's excuse, oh your application came in after hers :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes: ).

    A BSN is good to have if you decide that you want to go further (CRNA, get an MS later on) or get a slightly higher paycheck (back in the days, the difference was 0.30 more per hour, so I rationalized, it's .30 cents more per hour than I would have gotten otherwise:laugh: :laugh: :laugh: )
     
  6. angelic02

    angelic02 Senior Member

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    Thank you for all replies.
     
  7. SejGal

    SejGal New Member

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    With all due respect to non-BSN nurses I still can't understand y nurses w/their BSN receive nothing for the extra years of schooling they go through. With all the schooling that BSN nurses r required to go through (and the intensity of the schooling) it would be nice if they received some recognition and respect for their hard work. One option would be to standardize BSN as a minimal requirement for certain positions contrary to the current situation. It's upsetting to talk to nurses who have BSN's be totally distressed because they receive so little in return for all the extra time they've spent in schooling

    SejGal
     
  8. Noeljan

    Noeljan Senior Member

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    I agree sejal
     
  9. tedsadoc2002

    tedsadoc2002 Senior Member

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    It has been decades since the ANA has tried to make the BSN the minimum standard for licensure, however the cyclical shortages and the greed of hospitals and administrators (trying to pay the least possible dollar amount so they can make a profit) have made that somewhat impossible.

    For years, even before I was in nursing school, I had been aware of times when staffing was not that great and the LPN would be in charge and run a unit. Then, when I graduated with my associate degree, LPN's here in NY were virtually run out of hospitals and relegated to nursing homes. Now the trend has changed again (my brother is an LPN in a hospital setting for the last I'd say 10 yrs). I don't know what the solution would be. I believe that at least one venue for supplying nurses has almost completely dried up (hospital based schools of nursing or the "diploma" schooled nurse) so that leaves LP/LVN's, associate degree RN's, and the BSN. How to solve the problem? Send your suggestions to the ANA.:cool: :cool: :cool:
     

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