Resuming medical school after dismissal

This forum made possible through the generous support of SDN members, donors, and sponsors. Thank you.

theResilient

Full Member
Joined
Apr 5, 2023
Messages
11
Reaction score
7
Hello all, I write to ask for advice moving forward. In 2020 I was asked to leave a US medical school before I could take Step 1 for extremely dubious, purposely unclear reasons (to this day, I never received an official reason in writing). The reason given to me by the Vice Dean was that the advancement committee felt I wasn't meeting academic expectations despite me passing all my courses. I also committed no crimes, didn't cheat, and had no complaints from classmates, my professors, nor patients or doctors I dealt with. Basically, I believe I was dismissed because I clashed with the Vice Dean and administration the prior academic year and they didn't forget (very messy situation). Although I was initially given the chance to voluntarily withdraw, I was warned that that offer would be rescinded and replaced with a dismissal if I decided to appeal the decision all the way to the university provost, which I did. At this point, what are my options? It appears that the only thing in my favor is the fact that I wasn't dismissed due to academic or dishonorable reasons however, I know that many schools (virtually all US med schools) don't really care since I've been dismissed. Please provide any advice or suggestions, I will appreciate that greatly.

Members don't see this ad.
 
Hello all, I write to ask for advice moving forward. In 2020 I was asked to leave a US medical school before I could take Step 1 for extremely dubious, purposely unclear reasons (to this day, I never received an official reason in writing). The reason given to me by the Vice Dean was that the advancement committee felt I wasn't meeting academic expectations despite me passing all my courses. I also committed no crimes, didn't cheat, and had no complaints from classmates, my professors, nor patients or doctors I dealt with. Basically, I believe I was dismissed because I clashed with the Vice Dean and administration the prior academic year and they didn't forget (very messy situation). Although I was initially given the chance to voluntarily withdraw, I was warned that that offer would be rescinded and replaced with a dismissal if I decided to appeal the decision all the way to the university provost, which I did. At this point, what are my options? It appears that the only thing in my favor is the fact that I wasn't dismissed due to academic or dishonorable reasons however, I know that many schools (virtually all US med schools) don't really care since I've been dismissed. Please provide any advice or suggestions, I will appreciate that greatly.

Without more specifics, I doubt there's going to be much anyone can provide. You say they dismissed you because you weren't meeting academic expectations but later say you weren't dismissed for academic reasons. Admins are humans of course and can be vindictive but they still have to follow the student handbook so it's unlikely that the argument you had with them was the sole factor in your dismissal, but again with your one sided version, it's difficult to give any advice.

Ignoring all that, you say you were dismissed in 2020, what have you been doing since then? Time is your friend in that case, especially if it's been productive.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
Most likely your medical career is over. Not only were you dismissed early on, but clearly you either lack insight or what happened was so bad you omit it here. Either way doesn’t bode well.

Most preclinical students have minimal contact with faculty and admin. I’ll bet by M2 a number of people in the dean’s office couldn’t have picked me out of a lineup, much less known me well enough to hold a grudge. So again, either what you did was obviously terrible, or you truly have no insight into your issues such that you attribute your ills to some phantom grudge from a vice dean who surely hasn’t thought about you once in the last 2 years, if ever.

The bottom line answer is really you either convince your old school to give you another shot, that you’ve changed, or you find another career path. No other US school will admit you, and the overseas ones that would will simply take your money and give you no prospects.
 
  • Like
  • Love
Reactions: 16 users
Members don't see this ad :)
I don't mean to judge you because none of us know your background or what the exact circumstances were. Maybe you were indeed very unfortunate. However, regardless of the circumstances I agree that your medical career is over. There is just no reason for a prospective school to give you the benefit of the doubt and admit you over other qualified applicants without this mark on their record.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 5 users
Most likely your medical career is over. Not only were you dismissed early on, but clearly you either lack insight or what happened was so bad you omit it here. Either way doesn’t bode well.

Most preclinical students have minimal contact with faculty and admin. I’ll bet by M2 a number of people in the dean’s office couldn’t have picked me out of a lineup, much less known me well enough to hold a grudge. So again, either what you did was obviously terrible, or you truly have no insight into your issues such that you attribute your ills to some phantom grudge from a vice dean who surely hasn’t thought about you once in the last 2 years, if ever.

The bottom line answer is really you either convince your old school to give you another shot, that you’ve changed, or you find another career path. No other US school will admit you, and the overseas ones that would will simply take your money and give you no prospects.
The previous academic year I almost singlehandedly caused a tenured professor in the program to resign and work at another medical school because she revealed private information about me to other classmates. She never interacted with me prior to the leak and to make a long story short, the only way she could've been made privy to the information was through the vice dean. The trouble I raised trying to find out how she discovered said information brought much attention to me, which in hindsight was foolish. The following academic year the first thing they did was withhold financial aid from me for 7 months. I was the only student that experienced this. This almost resulted in an eviction. To this day, I haven't gotten a written reason behind the decision to have me withdraw. The fact that you still concluded that I must have done something terrible despite my explicitly stating I did nothing dishonorable during my tenure makes me disappointed with your reasoning. The fact that you can also reason that a medical school can't possibly be that vindictive after being on this forum for more than ten years and in the medical field for some time Is equally baffling. I didn't go into detail because it's really irrelevant and I don't need nor appreciate your unsolicited opinions. I do appreciate your bottom line, however.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
I could be mistaken but I believe I read a thread from someone who failed out of an MD school and then got back into a DO school.
 
The previous academic year I almost singlehandedly caused a tenured professor in the program to resign and work at another medical school because she revealed private information about me to other classmates. She never interacted with me prior to the leak and to make a long story short, the only way she could've been made privy to the information was through the vice dean. The trouble I raised trying to find out how she discovered said information brought much attention to me, which in hindsight was foolish. The following academic year the first thing they did was withhold financial aid from me for 7 months. I was the only student that experienced this. This almost resulted in an eviction. To this day, I haven't gotten a written reason behind the decision to have me withdraw. The fact that you still concluded that I must have done something terrible despite my explicitly stating I did nothing dishonorable during my tenure makes me disappointed with your reasoning. The fact that you can also reason that a medical school can't possibly be that vindictive after being on this forum for more than ten years and in the medical field for some time Is equally baffling. I didn't go into detail because it's really irrelevant and I don't need nor appreciate your unsolicited opinions. I do appreciate your bottom line, however.

You came on here asking for our opinions, don't get upset when you don't like what you hear. I also agree that your story is extremely fishy. Medical schools don't dismiss students for doing nothing wrong. You either were doing poor academically or you were unprofessional. Only you know the answer to this and if you truly don't then your insight is part of the problem.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 11 users
The previous academic year I almost singlehandedly caused a tenured professor in the program to resign and work at another medical school because she revealed private information about me to other classmates. She never interacted with me prior to the leak and to make a long story short, the only way she could've been made privy to the information was through the vice dean. The trouble I raised trying to find out how she discovered said information brought much attention to me, which in hindsight was foolish. The following academic year the first thing they did was withhold financial aid from me for 7 months. I was the only student that experienced this. This almost resulted in an eviction. To this day, I haven't gotten a written reason behind the decision to have me withdraw. The fact that you still concluded that I must have done something terrible despite my explicitly stating I did nothing dishonorable during my tenure makes me disappointed with your reasoning. The fact that you can also reason that a medical school can't possibly be that vindictive after being on this forum for more than ten years and in the medical field for some time Is equally baffling. I didn't go into detail because it's really irrelevant and I don't need nor appreciate your unsolicited opinions. I do appreciate your bottom line, however.
I will say, I don't find this story completely preposterous. It is possible that you're not being entirely forthcoming or are lacking insight into details of what actually happened, but faculty are not infallible. As you said, it was probably unwise to draw that much attention to yourself.

Again, I disagree that the details are irrelevant--I think they make all the difference. For example, when you matriculated were you a strong applicant who had multiple offers (ie might you have thrived at a different school), or were you a marginal applicant? What was your performance like prior to this incident? Do you have any trusted academic advisors or contacts from your previous school who would be willing to write you a letter of reference saying that you would be likely to succeed in a different environment? My bottom line assessment remains that your career is likely over... but if hypothetically you were a good applicant prior to enrolling, your transcript was clean, and you could somehow get a letter of recommendation, I don't think it's completely crazy to at least try applying to DO schools.

If however you were a marginal applicant, you transcript says that you were dismissed for "professionalism issues" or something else that sounds bad, and you've burned your bridges, then I'm not sure how you come back from that. And regardless, I really do stress that any play here is a longshot, so whether it's worth your time and money to try and make this happen at this point is up to you.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 4 users
The previous academic year I almost singlehandedly caused a tenured professor in the program to resign and work at another medical school because she revealed private information about me to other classmates. She never interacted with me prior to the leak and to make a long story short, the only way she could've been made privy to the information was through the vice dean. The trouble I raised trying to find out how she discovered said information brought much attention to me, which in hindsight was foolish. The following academic year the first thing they did was withhold financial aid from me for 7 months. I was the only student that experienced this. This almost resulted in an eviction. To this day, I haven't gotten a written reason behind the decision to have me withdraw. The fact that you still concluded that I must have done something terrible despite my explicitly stating I did nothing dishonorable during my tenure makes me disappointed with your reasoning. The fact that you can also reason that a medical school can't possibly be that vindictive after being on this forum for more than ten years and in the medical field for some time Is equally baffling. I didn't go into detail because it's really irrelevant and I don't need nor appreciate your unsolicited opinions. I do appreciate your bottom line, however.
If people truly retaliated against you as you describe then you might have grounds for legal action depending on your states statute of limitations. If you have proof of wrongdoing, then you may have remedies in the legal system.

If the trouble you raised trying to figure things out crossed lines of professional behavior, then they probably had grounds to dismiss. If you struggled academically and failed or remediated a number of classes, they may have also had cause to dismiss. My suspicion is that your passing your classes was borderline at best, and may have included a few failures and remediation. Marginal performance, some unprofessional interactions, and I can see the committee voting to dismiss.

Again I do feel your thought process here betrays a lack of insight into your situation. A rando preclinical student is not going to make anyone on faculty nearly resign, much less someone more senior and established. I personally know a couple tenured faculty at a US MD school who had some not so good interactions with a couple preclinical students, those students ended up getting dismissed over it, they sued the school and those faculty personally and won, and both are still teaching to this day while those students ended up in another profession. And from your own post you said they did give you a written reason: not meeting academic expectations. Again, if what you're saying is true and they failed to follow their own policies and hosed you, then you can bring legal action against them.

The odds of success are low though, especially since you clearly appealed this as far as you could and absolutely nobody along the way was sympathetic to your claims. I suspect you would find the courts give you a similar reception.
 
  • Like
  • Love
Reactions: 6 users
Hello all, I write to ask for advice moving forward. In 2020 I was asked to leave a US medical school before I could take Step 1 for extremely dubious, purposely unclear reasons (to this day, I never received an official reason in writing). The reason given to me by the Vice Dean was that the advancement committee felt I wasn't meeting academic expectations despite me passing all my courses. I also committed no crimes, didn't cheat, and had no complaints from classmates, my professors, nor patients or doctors I dealt with. Basically, I believe I was dismissed because I clashed with the Vice Dean and administration the prior academic year and they didn't forget (very messy situation). Although I was initially given the chance to voluntarily withdraw, I was warned that that offer would be rescinded and replaced with a dismissal if I decided to appeal the decision all the way to the university provost, which I did. At this point, what are my options? It appears that the only thing in my favor is the fact that I wasn't dismissed due to academic or dishonorable reasons however, I know that many schools (virtually all US med schools) don't really care since I've been dismissed. Please provide any advice or suggestions, I will appreciate that greatly.
Did you pass all your classes or did you get a grade that you think is a pass? I think my med school required almost a B average. So while a C was a passing grades, you couldn’t get straight Cs and keep moving along. I think there was a max of 2 Cs per academic year or something…
 
So to summarize, you were dismissed from medical school despite strong performance because, for no clear reason, the vice dean leaked private information about you to a professor, who then leaked it to your classmates - both actions that would jeopardize their careers - and then when you tried to figure out what happened, you were singled out by the administration for punishment, and then summarily dismissed for poor academic performance despite evidence to the contrary, an action your medical school administration clearly knows is illegal and would expose them to a lawsuit?

If all that is true and you can prove it, go talk to a lawyer. You're looking at reinstatement and/or six-seven figures in damages.

Of course, if you can't prove all of the above, and if you left even a single thing out of your story, you're done. If you were dismissed in 2020, your MCAT score is expired, as are (de facto) your letters of recommendation that got you into medical school in the first place.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 11 users
Members don't see this ad :)
Can u sue and get back in the school? Why didn't u try this? I mean if you didn't receive a reason in writing, why did u leave? I presume you probably took the fight too far, and instead of letting it go you kept on going. Y'know like picking on someone bigger than you. I would probably do something else tbh.
 
Can u sue and get back in the school? Why didn't u try this? I mean if you didn't receive a reason in writing, why did u leave? I presume you probably took the fight too far, and instead of letting it go you kept on going. Y'know like picking on someone bigger than you. I would probably do something else tbh.
Suing a medical school and thinking they would even allow you to come back is really insane. I wouldn't even want to be in the environment if I was the student that sued.

Honestly, from my understanding, once you proceed through the lawyer-up route, just know that not only will your previous medical school not want you, but the other medical schools would be hesitant to admit you. Hence why suing is the last resort, you can't come back from that.
 
Suing a medical school and thinking they would even allow you to come back is really insane. I wouldn't even want to be in the environment if I was the student that sued.

Honestly, from my understanding, once you proceed through the lawyer-up route, just know that not only will your previous medical school not want you, but the other medical schools would be hesitant to admit you. Hence why suing is the last resort, you can't come back from that.
Yeah, it's crazy, but he's ****ed anyway. And if you sue can't you force them to let you come back? It's not like he will get back to med school, he might as well burn the bridges and do residency somewhere else across the country later.

It was also a bit of a hyperbole, cause what OP is saying seems like he's got an uncle at Nintendo with the cheat codes and leaks
 
Suing a medical school and thinking they would even allow you to come back is really insane. I wouldn't even want to be in the environment if I was the student that sued.

Honestly, from my understanding, once you proceed through the lawyer-up route, just know that not only will your previous medical school not want you, but the other medical schools would be hesitant to admit you. Hence why suing is the last resort, you can't come back from that.
Might be worth doing if OP is $100k+ in debt. I would be pissed and either want a refund or to be let back in so I have a fighting chance of paying it off one day.
 
As fun as it is to imagine that someone could lawyer up and win, these things almost never work and only result in burning any bridges that weren't already burned. The OP would need to prove that an actual school policy was not followed, and/or they were dismissed in a retaliatory or discriminatory manner. 3 years after the fact, I suspect this is going to be a he-said/she-said situation, and the schools almost always win those arguments.

If there is ANY chance that someone at the OP's school would support a reapplication to other schools, I would exhaust those options. There is absolutely no chance that the OP will be reinstated at their old school, and I think it is unlikely he would be successful if he tried to sue for damages.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 5 users
Can u sue and get back in the school?
Might be worth doing if OP is $100k+ in debt.

In all seriousness, it's essentially impossible to sue medical schools and win, as there is legal precedent that medical schools can expel students for behavior "unbecoming of the profession," which does not have to be explicitly defined beforehand, and which cannot be legally overturned in court unless the expulsion is deemed to be arbitrary (i.e. only applies to certain students, not others), malicious (student is punished specifically to cause harm to the student/student's career, and not for another reason), or inconsistent with professional standards (i.e. if the student attended a different medical school, would that school also expel them?), with the caveat that the burden of proof generally lays with the plaintiff.

The actual legal precedent is much more complicated than this, and you can read a number of supreme court cases over the decades on the topic. But generally speaking, successful cases depend on clear deviation from policy on the medical school's behalf.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 4 users
I have heard of exactly one instance of a student suing themself back into school. The short version is the school inadvertently erased a lot of the records that justified the expulsion. The student lost a couple of years but made it through and out the second time. I'm sure it was awkward, but life goes on.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 2 users
In all seriousness, it's essentially impossible to sue medical schools and win, as there is legal precedent that medical schools can expel students for behavior "unbecoming of the profession," which does not have to be explicitly defined beforehand, and which cannot be legally overturned in court unless the expulsion is deemed to be arbitrary (i.e. only applies to certain students, not others), malicious (student is punished specifically to cause harm to the student/student's career, and not for another reason), or inconsistent with professional standards (i.e. if the student attended a different medical school, would that school also expel them?), with the caveat that the burden of proof generally lays with the plaintiff.

The actual legal precedent is much more complicated than this, and you can read a number of supreme court cases over the decades on the topic. But generally speaking, successful cases depend on clear deviation from policy on the medical school's behalf.
You are correct, after losing my second and final appeal (my first appeal went before the same vice dean, who was also head of the deciding committee, so quite pointless) that went before the provost, I went to a lawyer to discuss the possibility of suing. He said essentially the same thing and said my chance at winning was so minute that he even waived his consultation fee he normally charged to speak with prospective clients. He stated the only way I had a shot was if other students (they were several students that experienced similar circumstances but they either voluntarily withdrew or weren't punished as severely as I was) were willing to provide affidavits or testimony that this wasn't an isolated incident. Of course virtually no med student was willing (I cannot stress how punitive this administration was). He also plainly stated that even if I could get enough evidence, I didn't have enough money to afford the legal fight. In hindsight I should've been more humble, pay more attention to the horror stories I heard students before me went through there, and not pushed the issue so hard with my information being leaked, won the battle, lost the war. Thanks to those who took time to give advice, I know you all are extremely busy. I'll apply to law school, I have always been interested in that field.
 
  • Care
  • Like
Reactions: 3 users
I have heard of exactly one instance of a student suing themself back into school. The short version is the school inadvertently erased a lot of the records that justified the expulsion. The student lost a couple of years but made it through and out the second time. I'm sure it was awkward, but life goes on.
I was an intern with a student whose dad had sued him back into medical school.
He lasted 1 year in a surgical residency (in those days the surgery residencies were a "pyramid" in this case started with 6 interns and only invited 4 back for year 2.) The only thing he could do with this amount of training was to be a prior approval doc for an insurance company.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 4 users
The previous academic year I almost singlehandedly caused a tenured professor in the program to resign and work at another medical school because she revealed private information about me to other classmates. She never interacted with me prior to the leak and to make a long story short, the only way she could've been made privy to the information was through the vice dean. The trouble I raised trying to find out how she discovered said information brought much attention to me, which in hindsight was foolish. The following academic year the first thing they did was withhold financial aid from me for 7 months. I was the only student that experienced this. This almost resulted in an eviction. To this day, I haven't gotten a written reason behind the decision to have me withdraw. The fact that you still concluded that I must have done something terrible despite my explicitly stating I did nothing dishonorable during my tenure makes me disappointed with your reasoning. The fact that you can also reason that a medical school can't possibly be that vindictive after being on this forum for more than ten years and in the medical field for some time Is equally baffling. I didn't go into detail because it's really irrelevant and I don't need nor appreciate your unsolicited opinions. I do appreciate your bottom line, however.
The details are very relevant. I think the details are the most relevant aspect of this whole thing, actually. But seeing that you have already discussed this with a lawyer, I don't think you need to reveal them here.
 
Last edited:
Hmm. This sounds like you were either wronged or felt you were wronged; I have no way of telling which is which. You then got mad about it and kicked up a big fuss. Maybe professionally, maybe not. Then, the administration came down on you like a ton of bricks. By your account, there have been several students that "voluntarily" withdrew from your school. That, I believe: your administration is harsh. Maybe even jerks. Are they the kind of powerful jerk that could get got by a lawsuit? Probably not.

Good luck with everything; it is terrible if someone screwed you (and your classmates) over that badly. If you "almost singlehandedly caused a tenured professor in the program to resign and work at another medical school because she revealed private information about me to other classmates"...then I could see the administration being mad at you and finding a way to boot you because of that.

Your career in medicine - unfortunately - is probably over, although if things happened as you say they did there are probably faculty members that would write you a stellar LoR and feel that you have been badly wronged. With that...your chances are better, but I can't speak any more than that. Could be that you just have two Powerball lottery tickets instead of one.

Be interesting, though, if you became a lawyer and made a career out of suing medschools like your old one.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users
Hmm. This sounds like you were either wronged or felt you were wronged; I have no way of telling which is which. You then got mad about it and kicked up a big fuss. Maybe professionally, maybe not. Then, the administration came down on you like a ton of bricks. By your account, there have been several students that "voluntarily" withdrew from your school. That, I believe: your administration is harsh. Maybe even jerks. Are they the kind of powerful jerk that could get got by a lawsuit? Probably not.

Good luck with everything; it is terrible if someone screwed you (and your classmates) over that badly. If you "almost singlehandedly caused a tenured professor in the program to resign and work at another medical school because she revealed private information about me to other classmates"...then I could see the administration being mad at you and finding a way to boot you because of that.

Your career in medicine - unfortunately - is probably over, although if things happened as you say they did there are probably faculty members that would write you a stellar LoR and feel that you have been badly wronged. With that...your chances are better, but I can't speak any more than that. Could be that you just have two Powerball lottery tickets instead of one.

Be interesting, though, if you became a lawyer and made a career out of suing medschools like your old one.
No medical school has been successfully sued as long as it was shown that they were not arbitrary or capricious. Med schools aren't stupid, nor do they have Stupid attorneys.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 6 users
No medical school has been successfully sued as long as it was shown that they were not arbitrary or capricious. Med schools aren't stupid, nor do they have Stupid attorneys.
Bingo. Plus I feel like the lawsuit is always where you get the rest of the story like “plaintiff began a public harassment campaign against the faculty member who he alleges had wronged him. He would frequently follow her to her home and she eventually had to get a restraining order against him. He continued to violate the order by harassing her online and by emails and through public social media postings….”

While I don’t know the details of this case, those are some details from another dismissal case. Where we find out the tenured faculty almost left because of criminal harassment. It’s always something like that - some massive “detail” that’s gets glossed over until the other side can present evidence.

Plus there’s the fundamental issue in suing a professional school: you are basically a judge to supplant his judgement for that of an entire faculty. Most judges are understandably hesitant to assume the role of deciding who is fit to be a doctor since that’s not remotely part of their training. The school has to do something very bad very boldly such that a judge feels compelled to make that move.

And the truth is that preclinical students are such invisible faceless beings that nobody cares enough about one of them to do something really bad to them.
 
  • Like
  • Love
Reactions: 2 users
No medical school has been successfully sued as long as it was shown that they were not arbitrary or capricious. Med schools aren't stupid, nor do they have Stupid attorneys.
There may be individual fools that can get busted for sheer, unmitigated idiocy. Which this may well be...IF this is how the OP says it was. That is a HUGE "if" there.
 
The details are very relevant. I think the details are the most relevant aspect of this whole thing, actually. But seeing that you have already discussed this with a lawyer, I don't think you need to reveal them here.
It’s actually CANT be, hope this OP isn’t dumb. Posting this can even be debated
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
If you have spoken with a lawyer and consulted the administration of the medical school, and both options came to a standstill, as tragic as this may sound, your medical career in this specific field is most likely over. Perhaps PA/NP routes are not completely closed doors, but you will have to reinvent yourself completely and learn from this tragic situation.

The previous academic year I almost singlehandedly caused a tenured professor in the program to resign and work at another medical school because she revealed private information about me to other classmates. She never interacted with me prior to the leak and to make a long story short, the only way she could've been made privy to the information was through the vice dean. The trouble I raised trying to find out how she discovered said information brought much attention to me, which in hindsight was foolish. The following academic year the first thing they did was withhold financial aid from me for 7 months. I was the only student that experienced this. This almost resulted in an eviction. To this day, I haven't gotten a written reason behind the decision to have me withdraw. The fact that you still concluded that I must have done something terrible despite my explicitly stating I did nothing dishonorable during my tenure makes me disappointed with your reasoning. The fact that you can also reason that a medical school can't possibly be that vindictive after being on this forum for more than ten years and in the medical field for some time Is equally baffling. I didn't go into detail because it's really irrelevant and I don't need nor appreciate your unsolicited opinions. I do appreciate your bottom line, however.
I may sound lackluster or monotone on this forum, but I am sorry that this has happened to you. I've had similar situations occur unintentionally by professors in during my undergraduate career, but I chose to discuss these issues one-on-one with the professors because I recognized that mistakes can occur, stories may be shared unintentionally, despite all reason. You mentioned "the trouble I raised trying to find out..." here in the portions that I highlighted and it's very concerning that a professor in the program would almost resign due to the actions or behaviors (potentially?) that you caused or raised while doing your personal investigation of this situation. As an anonymous user on this forum, I'm sure some others here may agree that if you raised concern to that extent at your medical school that you may have acted in an excessively, obstructive manner rather than consulting the professor one-on-one, discussing with the school administration or dean, or even asking peers for aid on this situation. Of course, you may consider my opinion unsolicited or bottom-line, but I feel that there are acknowledgements to be made about this situation, and as a poster above said, perhaps try your luck at new DO medical schools (Orlando COM, new LECOM campus, etc.) if you're certain about the rocky road ahead of you, cheers.
 
I've had similar situations occur unintentionally by professors in during my undergraduate career, but I chose to discuss these issues one-on-one with the professors because I recognized that mistakes can occur, stories may be shared unintentionally, despite all reason.
I've had something like that happen too. I attended a small school and simply talked to the professor in question one on one; he apologized and that was the end of that. OP wound up relieving themselves in the professor's cornflakes and wound up on someone's list. From there...it was one more strike and he was out.

Honestly: I would seek therapy or a professional opinion. It may also be possible that you do not come from a white collar middle class background and, through no fault of your own, failed to properly navigate this situation. If this is the case you might look for advice. Good luck!
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
Just to add something that may help others in school and their careers…
ALWAYS print out the pertinent emails.

Once you quit or they fire you, you will not have access to the email account tied to school/job and hence lose any evidence you may have.

I always CC email the while chain to my personal account… but since you can edit those before sending, I also print them out.

One of my classmates had something like this happen… sexual advances by a professor.
She failed 2 classes while all these emails were going back & forth b/w her and admin.
Once she failed they kicked her out and it was only when another student accused professor of same thing and now 1st student had “precedent” that they agreed to take her back in next year’s class

They fired the professor

Same goes for all things that need an email - DEA, CSR, ABIM etc.
Always use your private email… as long as its not something like “[email protected]
 
  • Like
Reactions: 4 users
Top