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Popoy

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Here's an interesting question for your nursing folks.... How do you folks view allopaths and osteopaths? Just curious.

Feel free to discuss how you feel about docs in general please.... As a future doc, I would like to know to better understand my colleagues.... Most of my family members are nurses in the health care profession, so I've gotten their perspective... Care to share yours? Thanx in advance.
 

NurseyK

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I'm not sure of what you are after....

Some docs are jerks - some are not. Some nurses are jerks - some are not. Some Techs are jerks - some are not....get my drift?

The only blanket statements I can come up with are...to be nice to those that have more experience. Keep your eyes and ears open. Don't bust balls. Don't forget where you came from. (I get told that last one a lot lately since I, too, will be attending medschool this Fall.)

You can follow my little "saga" of our new ER doc on the other thread. She came in all ball$ to the wall, take charge...welp, her body count is up to about 6-8 people now in the last 2 yrs. Nursing does not support her. She's been hung out to dry in court for malpractice/negligence. The Office of Professional Misconduct has called twice to my personal witness. Since I have confronted her, she no longer busts MY hump (unfortunately, she's still on other's backs). As a consequence, I now cover her a$$ more than I used to.

First EX (before I spoke with her): Pt came in with severe respiratory distress. Clinically, he needed to be intubated. I found the doc at the desk (bullshi##ing on the phone), presented the pt to her. She waited to go in. Another nurse came up, presented the pt (I went back in the room to prepare to tube). She finally went in after another wait. She ordered another neb tx instead of intubated; farted around a bit more, then finally tubed pt. As a PS...pt died a few minutes later. My nurse's notes (that stood up in court): "MD informed of pt condition (my assessment inserted here). Neb tx initiated per orders. MD informed of change in pt. condition (my assessment here - as pt was about to code). No new orders received." (All of these statements were timed.) Needless to say, my name (and nursing) was taken off the lawsuit.

A more recent EX (after speaking with her): Last R/O CVA (stroke) with ? new onset AFib (irregular heart rhythm), she wanted to give Heparin or Lovenox (blood thinners). Which can be all fine and dandy, but...we hadn't received the Head CT report back to check if she was an ischemic (blood clot) or hemorrhagic (bleeding) type of stroke. Odds would have it, she would be an ischemic type of CVA d/t her AFib (can throw clots) BUT....it would be unwise and unsafe for us to give blood thinners without for sure knowing if she was a big ol' head bleed. So, after she gave me the order, I said, "So, how was the CT?" "I want to give this now," she says. I looked at her. "Oh yeah, let's wait on this," she then says after a pause. As a PS...the patient was a big ol' head bleed. Whew, good thing one of us was thinking or the pt could have had a worse outcome.

So, I guess the moral of the story is...play nice in the sandbox with all the other kids.

Kat ;)
 

Popoy

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Thanks Kat,
The moral of your story is what I was expecting.... I'm not really expecting a specific type of response. Thanks, though, for you input.... Any others?
 
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turtleboard

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From a med student perspective, nurses know you're nothing and some take advantage of that. The majority are willing to help, but a lot of them will sooner spit on you than help. The first time I scrubbed in on a case, I wasn't properly instructed by the resident on how to dry my hands and forearms. I walked into the OR, was handed a towel by the nurse, and proceeded to dry my hands like any person would (which, incidentally, is not really like the way you'd dry your hands after scrubbing in). The scrub nurse SCREAMED "NO!" and started calling me "f**cking stupid," "get out of here," and "she'd tell the resident how '******ed' I was."

Luckily the Anesthesiologist was there to hear all of this and helped me out when the resident questioned me about the whole incident. It goes to show you that there are good ones and bad ones in the MD, DO, RN, NP, and PA professions.
 

Popoy

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Most definitely .... OUCH!!! Talk about the good, the bad, and the ugly!!!

Anyone else?
 
S

Stinky T

I know of several medical students who have had similar experiences with scrub nurses. I think they enjoy tormenting 3rd year medical students.
 

groundhog

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Turtleboard,
Your experience made me chuckle. Take comfort in the fact that it happens across the entire spectrum of occupations. Some veterans feel that it is their duty to let the pimple faced fast track rookies know that there is a big differnece between formal education and the real world. Just remember how you felt and try to be kinder to the young punks after you become one of the "silver backs."
 

jdaasbo

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be polite and courteous to everyone, but don't take any b.s. from anyone. There is a fine line between standing your ground and appearing arrogant-this is the most difficult part i think. Most helpful to realize is this: people who abuse and torment others were abused and tormented themselves (be they scrub nurses, surgeons, anesthesiologist, or whoever). Remember how they made you feel and make a personal note not to do the same when you are "the man (or woman)". last of all, it is not personal (usually).
 

Popoy

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Wow.... didn't think this thread will be revived again.... Thanks for the additional input.... It's been noted.

Any others share their experience? Thanx, :cool:
 

DaNugget79

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Originally posted by turtleboard:
•From a med student perspective, nurses know you're nothing and some take advantage of that. The majority are willing to help, but a lot of them will sooner spit on you than help. The first time I scrubbed in on a case, I wasn't properly instructed by the resident on how to dry my hands and forearms. I walked into the OR, was handed a towel by the nurse, and proceeded to dry my hands like any person would (which, incidentally, is not really like the way you'd dry your hands after scrubbing in). The scrub nurse SCREAMED "NO!" and started calling me "f**cking stupid," "get out of here," and "she'd tell the resident how '******ed' I was."

Luckily the Anesthesiologist was there to hear all of this and helped me out when the resident questioned me about the whole incident. It goes to show you that there are good ones and bad ones in the MD, DO, RN, NP, and PA professions.•

Just so it never happens to me, how are you supposed to dry your hands?
 

Neurogirl

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Ok...here's how it's done. 1. You grab ONE END (never the middle) of the towel with one hand and use that hand to dry the other hand. 2. Dry from the fingers down to the elbow and never go backwards. 3. With the DRY hand, grab the DRY end of the towel and dry the other hand. 4. Drop the towel in the dirty linen. 5. Even though you've just scrubed your hands they are STILL DIRTY so you CANNOT use them to pull on the gown sleeves (which you'll be tempted to do), so...after drying, just hold your arms in front of you (DO NOT let them drop below your waist) and let the scrub nurse do the rest.

BTW, after scrubbing in, the only "clean" area is the anterior chest and arms. EVERYTHNG ELSE is "dirty". You will "contaminate the field", ie. "break scrub", if you: tap anyone on the shoulder/back, touch your face/mask, let your hands drop below your waist etc., etc.

The first time you scrub in, make sure someone else goes first so you can watch. They actually had a video for us to view. However, even with preparation, the first time is very intimidating...scrub nurses can smell inexperience and LOVE to embarrass med students. If all else fails and you have to go in without having seen the process, you MUST inform the scrub nurse and ask for help. They're less likely to be mean if you just admit your inexperience and beg for mercy. :eek:
 
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