that redhead

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So I'm working on my rotations schedule for next year. We get 12 weeks of external rotations (all of which I will be taking at home, 1200 miles away) and 12 weeks "off" (all of which I'll take at home). In anyone's opinion, is there a disadvantage to scheduling all of my internal rotations and then being home for essentially half the year (the five or six months before graduation)? My biggest drive in scheduling them that way is a. to save myself the expense of traveling, rent up at school, etc and b. the weather up at school can be dicey in the winter months and I'd rather be at home where it's more reasonable for traveling and stuff like that.

Thanks in advance :)
 
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I know where you're coming from, as I tried to do something similar during my rotations as well (didn't work out for several reasons). However, if you can do it, and it works for you, there are no serious disads. Just consider, however:

1. Any important and mandatory meetings that may take place during 4th year, especially towards the tail end regarding USDA licensing, graduation, and the like. Make sure to check with your Uni about the details of this before you go.

2. Any influence it may have on any relationships with professors/clinicians that may be vouching for you for a position (if you think that may be a need).

3. Any potentially interesting/important local events regarding jobs/networking and so forth.
 
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that redhead

that redhead

7+ Year Member
Feb 26, 2010
10,351
8,347
I know where you're coming from, as I tried to do something similar during my rotations as well (didn't work out for several reasons). However, if you can do it, and it works for you, there are no serious disads. Just consider, however:

1. Any important and mandatory meetings that may take place during 4th year, especially towards the tail end regarding USDA licensing, graduation, and the like. Make sure to check with your Uni about the details of this before you go.

2. Any influence it may have on any relationships with professors/clinicians that may be vouching for you for a position (if you think that may be a need).

3. Any potentially interesting/important local events regarding jobs/networking and so forth.
Thanks for the input :) I'm thinking of meeting with our academic person and asking what she thinks of the situation too; I'll bring up these points and see if she's aware of anything that I should know about.
 

Coquette22

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TR if you can at all spare yourself another PEI winter, DO IT. (Though I will miss you, haha). Just promise you'll spare a thought for those of us stranded here and buried up to our necks in snow...
 

cowgirla

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So I'm working on my rotations schedule for next year. We get 12 weeks of external rotations (all of which I will be taking at home, 1200 miles away) and 12 weeks "off" (all of which I'll take at home). In anyone's opinion, is there a disadvantage to scheduling all of my internal rotations and then being home for essentially half the year (the five or six months before graduation)? My biggest drive in scheduling them that way is a. to save myself the expense of traveling, rent up at school, etc and b. the weather up at school can be dicey in the winter months and I'd rather be at home where it's more reasonable for traveling and stuff like that.

Thanks in advance :)
You get 12 weeks of vacay??? we only get three, plus a week for the holidays.

I say schedule in a chunk if you can. My last three rotations are off campus, off campus and vacay. I had high hopes of being all moved out of my house before leaving but it's not looking promising at this point- I have no time!
 
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that redhead

that redhead

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You get 12 weeks of vacay??? we only get three, plus a week for the holidays.

I say schedule in a chunk if you can. My last three rotations are off campus, off campus and vacay. I had high hopes of being all moved out of my house before leaving but it's not looking promising at this point- I have no time!
Yup :D Two (three week blocks) are right around the winter holidays/NAVLE so I doubt they'll be true vacation, but the other two blocks are free. I'm thinking of picking up a few hours at my work just to keep myself tuned in to stuff but definitely not all of it.

@Coquette22, that's exactly what I'm thinking! I'm afraid to come home after this break...all I see on my weather app is how much it's snowing up there :eek:
 

Ben and Me

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Are you applying for internships? The only possible problem could be with visiting clinics before the internship application deadline, especially if you're interested in equine -- those internship applications (for private practices and certain academic institutions, such as UGA) are due much earlier than the match and most require a 2 week externship to be a competitive applicant.
 

2CatMatt

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I know this thread is kind of old, but I have a rotation scheduling question as well. We have to pick 2 out of the following 3: Oncology, Neuro, Cardio. I'd love to do all three, but it doesn't seem like that's going to be possible. I'm trying to pick the two that I'll use the most out in practice. Any advice? Thanks!
 

pooter

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Take neuro and whichever you think you'll enjoy more out of the other two.

Rationale: the neuro exam is a specific skill set that isn't really covered in other rotations. You'll deal with neuro cases a *lot* in general practice and emergency. You'll deal with it some in just about any other specialty you go into. A good internist can teach you how to auscult a heart or palpate a lymph node, but to really learn the neuro exam, you want a neurologist teaching you.

Signed, a new grad with Regrets.
 

dyachei

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I know this thread is kind of old, but I have a rotation scheduling question as well. We have to pick 2 out of the following 3: Oncology, Neuro, Cardio. I'd love to do all three, but it doesn't seem like that's going to be possible. I'm trying to pick the two that I'll use the most out in practice. Any advice? Thanks!
unless you plan on oncology as a specialty (or special interest), cardio is more valuable. The majority of the time, you will have to refer for chemo (unless you're at a large clinic or referral center). Whereas, you'll be listening to hearts daily and reading ECGs regularly
 
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Jamr0ckin

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I second taking cardio. I feel like my auscultation skills markedly improved after my cardio rotation.
 

2CatMatt

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Awesome, that's the way I was leaning too. Thanks for the advice!
 

jmo1012

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you didnt mention ophtho, but i'd try to get that and neuro if possible, because you will use both of those specific exams a ton as a vet, and its so much harder when you've done them twice in school as a lab and not on real, symptomatic patients :-/

i loved cardio when i took it - didnt get to take neuro, ophtho, or onc (got some neuro and ophtho at a private practice)