C

cvpmvp33

so, what schools in the U.S. have an overall g.p.a of 3.0-3.2 of admitted students into their program.
 

sirhumpsalot

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probably all of them. i would doubt if many DPT programs are maxing out. too much money for too little return.
 

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probably all of them. i would doubt if many DPT programs are maxing out. too much money for too little return.

All of them! My good friend applied late in december, with zero clinical skills post his bac. degree with a 2.99 GPA and applied to the top DPT schools and got into all of them, even USC.
 
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terse

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All of them! My good friend applied late in december, with zero clinical skills post his bac. degree with a 2.99 GPA and applied to the top DPT schools and got into all of them, even USC.

wow that's interesting considering most (including USC) require some sort of PT exp or volunteering. what other schools did he get into?
 
C

cvpmvp33

that seems pretty rare, or am i wrong? because im sure that schools are getting around 100-200 applications for 30-40 seats. anyone else got any other info or admission experiences?????????
 

Auron

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how hard is getting into a DPT program in the states compared to getting admission to a medical school (in the states).

DPT much easier?
 

fbplayr75

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I'm not sure,

All I know is that I have two freinds with 3.3-3.5 GPA's that have been wait listed.

I study with kids who have already been accepted to Pod school and medical school with GPA's of around 3.2

go figure

Why does it almost seem harder to get into PT school than POD, PA , and sometimes medical school when PT's make less money then all three of those professions?
 

Cyrus44

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Most of my classmates had 3.5 or above. School started with 400 pretherapy just in my class and ended up with 40 picked. We've already had 5 kids kick out of the program for failing a class or having less than a 3.0. Its freakin crazy. I miss having a curve :( .
 

truthseeker

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I'm not sure,

All I know is that I have two freinds with 3.3-3.5 GPA's that have been wait listed.

I study with kids who have already been accepted to Pod school and medical school with GPA's of around 3.2

go figure

Why does it almost seem harder to get into PT school than POD, PA , and sometimes medical school when PT's make less money then all three of those professions?


You can teach 300 med students how blood clots at the same time, but you cannot do the same with PT students when you are teaching them what a capsular end feel is.
 
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Grue1some

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My opinion on this issue...

Info about me
GRE -1000
GPA 3.45
Science 3.29
BS in Exercise Science
500 Hours PT Volunteer in Various Places (Nursing Home, Peds, Orthopedic, Wound Care, and Aqua)
Applied to 22 Physical Therapy places (Spent a lot of money filling out applications, road travel, and interview)..

Outcome
Rejected by 5 with a letter stating due to GPA, GRE scores, and other crap you do not qualify enough.
Three lost my application or said I sent it late? I post marked it before the deadline.
12 interviews which included phone, video tape (yes one school actually gave me an option to video tape myself while they send questions to a physical therapist via fax), and an actual session.
The other two schools do not interview. They just mail you acceptance letters.

Results:
Waiting list on 11
1 accepted me
The second one took me off the waiting list and into the acceptance category.
Waiting for more results

The reason for applying so much..
Physical therapy school is MUCH harder to get in than med school
Physical Therapy schools accepts 15-50 people while med schools accepts 100-200+ people.
The process involves first a weed out system based on GPA and GRE. It doesnt matter how many hours in PT you worked or volunteered. You may have 1000's of hours but below a 1000 on the GRE AND 3.0 you might as well go do another profession. It is sad but true. I know a guy who could not get higher than a 800 on the GRE, but his GPA was 3.7 and his science was 3.5. He could not get in with the schools that wanted GRE's but got in to two schools which did not use the GRE as a factor.

What was funny is that a friend of mine got in a school with a 3.2 GPA and a Science average of 3.19. However his GRE score was 1100+.

The most valuable tool I used in finding out the schools
Apta.org

Here is a link to all the schools based on Location, GPA, and GRE scores

http://www.apta.org/AM/Template.cfm...schools/acc_schools_map.cfm&process=3&type=PT
 

Cyrus44

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My opinion on this issue...

Info about me
GRE -1000
GPA 3.45
Science 3.29
BS in Exercise Science
500 Hours PT Volunteer in Various Places (Nursing Home, Peds, Orthopedic, Wound Care, and Aqua)
Applied to 22 Physical Therapy places (Spent a lot of money filling out applications, road travel, and interview)..

Outcome
Rejected by 5 with a letter stating due to GPA, GRE scores, and other crap you do not qualify enough.
Three lost my application or said I sent it late? I post marked it before the deadline.
12 interviews which included phone, video tape (yes one school actually gave me an option to video tape myself while they send questions to a physical therapist via fax), and an actual session.
The other two schools do not interview. They just mail you acceptance letters.




What state is this?
 

Grue1some

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I am from Louisiana. There are only two schools for physical therapy there. One in New Orleans (LSU) and the second is LSU in shreveport. I applied to various out of state schools.
 

Cyrus44

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Wow that is strange. I didnt know it was that competitive there.
 
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Grue1some

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Put it this way. I was there for an interview in shreveport. For the past 3 days, there were 100 applicants for 35 spots..
 

Cyrus44

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same with our school
 

MYangDPT

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Dear Gruesome,

I am from the New York City area an applied to about 8 schools within this general area. I did not break a 1000 on my GREs- (my first try )and decided to apply anyway. I got accepted into two schools and am waitlisted for pittsburgh. My gpa is only about a 3.3. I am really surprised that you're wait listed for so many schools. But have you made a decision yet?
 

Grue1some

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I am still waiting for the other schools but I decided to not go with the first one that accepted me which was a private school in Pennsylvania. This was due to cost..The other school is in Missouri. It costs 20,000 per year + living and other expenses. I got by next week to decide...I live in Louisiana.
 

Grue1some

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Six schools I found dont require GRE. Try your luck on them

1)One school in Des Moines Iowa doesnt count GRE. Do you like corn and John Wayne? (The cowboy not the guy that got his thing chopped off by his wife)?
http://www.dmu.edu/PT/
2)New Jersey.
http://intraweb.stockton.edu/eyos/page.cfm?siteID=73&pageID=49
3)University of Toledo
http://hsc.utoledo.edu/allh/pt/Admissions.html

4)Arkansas State University
http://pt.astate.edu/PDF/MPT%20Application for Admission 2006-2007.pdf
Note about the Graduate Record Examination (GRE): The GRE is not required for admission to the Graduate Program in Physical Therapy. However, the GRE and the GRE Writing Assessment are required for students to advance beyond their first year of study in the MPT program.

5)Loma Linda
http://www.llu.edu/llu/sahp/pt/dsc.html

6)Florida Internation University doesnt require GRE~I think

This is for OT school
http://www.usd.edu/gradsch/catalogs/OTupdatejan06.pdf

Just read DPT by student 30 for more info.
 

PREMEDWOAHS

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Experience has shown that generally a cumulative GPA of at least 3.00 must be presented for an applicant to be competitive.


chances of getting in with a 2.0, even to this school? 1%, but i will probably still try because my grades blow more than paris hilton.
 

Grue1some

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Awww man, you dont have to say that :smuggrin:. There are other health professions out there. Its just this one seems to be the most competitive for some reason :thumbdown: :laugh::thumbup:

Just be dam sure you can score 1100 on the GRE.. LOL
Go read my comments/advice on thread DPT. Trust me the work was a pain.
 
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Grue1some

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Three different PT forums for anyone interested in exploring

http://physicaltherapist.com/forum/index.php

http://www.physicaltherapyforum.com/ubbthreads/ubbthreads.php

http://www.rehabedge.com/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi



Also two other programs dont require GRE scores

Concordia University
http://www.cuw.edu/AdultEd_Graduate/programs/dpt/prospective_students.html

Indiana University
http://www.shrs.iupui.edu/pt/admissions.php


I recommend rehabedge.
It has a very large community
I found Dr Wagner lol

Check these two posts



I have 8 years of experience in outpatient orthopedics, masters, and certified in Mckenzie. This is my first post and I am curious to see how others feel about our profession and I am asking for help.
It appears to me that this profession is going no where. In my state we do not have direct access and we are at the mercy of the MD. You cannot just open a private practice and think you will survive. The ortho group in our area opened their own practice and essentially shut down some of the other practices.
I have also never felt the warm fuzzy of a "medical team" that I was told about in school. In my world, the doctor is always right and if he wants stupid ultrasound on a chronic back, then you either do it or you fight. I am a fighter.
I would like to know what we, as physical therapists can do to save this profession. How do we get real direct access?
How do we stop physician owned practices?
How can we compete with chiropractors, who we all love to bitch about, but they laugh at us?
How do we get better reimbursement? Unless you think $17/ treatment is enough.

I didnt go to school for 7 yrs to max out at 65k.
I couldn't possibly recommend this profession to anyone. Could you really say to someone you like, "hey go to school for 7 years, become a "doctor of physical therapy" and make little money and do exactly what the real doctors tell you to do?"
Sorry for the rant, but lets do something about this. What kind of legislation is out there.

I have waited for things to get better for the last 5 years, they have only gotten worse.
What can we do????????


Hello,
Saw this posted in the APTA bulletin today. I especially liked what is highlighted.

"NORTH DAKOTA PHYSICAL THERAPISTS

CELEBRATE LEGISLATION UPDATING THEIR PRACTICE ACT

Physical therapists in North Dakota celebrated a victory this week as a new practice act was signed into law by Governor John Hoeven. The passed legislation, which ensures that physical therapists in the state of North Dakota are practicing under the most up-to-date and highest standards, will be come effective August 1, 2005.

The updated definition of physical therapy reflects the actual treatment techniques practiced by physical therapists on a day-to-day basis, including manual therapy, orthotics and prosthetics, debridement, and wound care. The new act also contains a definition of manual therapy that includes mobilization and manipulation, and protects the terms "physical therapy" and "physiotherapy."
"The passage of the legislation was necessary for the physical therapists and residents of North Dakota. It truly reflects the treatments that physical therapists can provide for their patients, and we're very excited that the legislators recognized our ability to perform these services," said Mary Jo Wagar, PT, OCS, president of the North Dakota Physical Therapy Association (NDPTA).
 

sam0090

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It's posts like the one Greue1some just stuck up that make me second guess the Physical Therapy profession. Right now i'm loaded under 20+ hours a semester, shadowing, ECs, and maintaining an A average. The fact that all this work might not amount to the financial leverage that a plumber has is a little bit disheartening, especially considering that a speciallity like podiatry or PA has far greater financial benefits without being stuck to a pager on call like an MD/DO. I know quite well that i'm not going to become a millionaire wtih the profession, but with the school I plan on going through (3 year DPT, 1 year orthopedic fellowship) I can't help but choke to think that i'll max out so quick, at least financially, for all the education i'm to endure. :(

For the time being I'm still going towards DPT, but if the financial glass ceiling continues to exist, I could very quickly see myself shedding the DPT title for a DPM or PA. :idea:
 

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More stuff from someone at physicaltherapist.com/forum

What is the value for working in a Physical Therapist owned practice? Below are 5 reasons, please add any other comments or reasons you may have!

5 Reasons to Work at a Physical Therapist Owned Practice

1. Genuine passion for the profession. A shared
vision or purpose to positively impact your profession and community.

2. Understanding of what is involved in patient
treatment, including therapy practices and necessary equipment. Sharing of clinician?s mindset and balancing treating patients with documentation work load. Sensitive to the needs of therapists and the value of support staff. Skip the politics. Less explanation to achieve goals. Fully appreciating the value of continuing education. Familiar with laws and regulations determining the code of ethics for practice.

3. Mentorship. Working for a passionate leader to mentor PT?s in various career tracks ? either in specialties or in business/leadership related areas.

4. Evidence-Based Practice. Physical Therapist-owned practices can be more innovative and cutting edge to achieve quality and outcomes.

5. Pride. ?Working for a PT-owned clinic means as a PT you never have to struggle with the ethical question of the appropriateness of working for a ?Referral for Profit? company. A clear conscious is priceless.?~ Jeffrey W. Hathaway, PT
 

PT2MD

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It's posts like the one Greue1some just stuck up that make me second guess the Physical Therapy profession. Right now i'm loaded under 20+ hours a semester, shadowing, ECs, and maintaining an A average. The fact that all this work might not amount to the financial leverage that a plumber has is a little bit disheartening, especially considering that a speciallity like podiatry or PA has far greater financial benefits without being stuck to a pager on call like an MD/DO. I know quite well that i'm not going to become a millionaire wtih the profession, but with the school I plan on going through (3 year DPT, 1 year orthopedic fellowship) I can't help but choke to think that i'll max out so quick, at least financially, for all the education i'm to endure. :(

For the time being I'm still going towards DPT, but if the financial glass ceiling continues to exist, I could very quickly see myself shedding the DPT title for a DPM or PA. :idea:

or MD...or DO...you've got lots of options. Keep in mind though that $55-75K aint chicken scratch in some parts. It can actually be a great living. :D

I am making $30K more per year than when I started five years ago. I feel the ceiling coming up though. I could live happily and comfortably on this salary, but I'll never drive a ferrari. Not that I would if I could.;)
 

PREMEDWOAHS

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can u afford a bmw, god i love bmw's, so pretty....sure would beat my 1992 honda civic..
 

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I could care less of driving fancy a$$ cars or living big time. I just want a flexible lifestyle. Hopefully I made a right decision in life.

For example I rather go eat at a all you can eat 12.00 Lunch sushi buffet and get filled then spend 60-100.00 eating quality sushi and still go hungry.
 

runnerdoc2010

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I am a physical therapist currently in medical school. I worked in the field for 7 years before returning to school. Medical school is much more difficult to get in versus physical therapy school. The DPT transition has slowed down the applications. Many schools are in great need for exceptional students. The standards have been lowered the past few years. This trend will continue as less people enter the field. The southeast has a great shortage of PTs and reimbursement can't compensate the salary demand for such a shortage.
 

Grue1some

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I am a physical therapist currently in medical school. I worked in the field for 7 years before returning to school. Medical school is much more difficult to get in versus physical therapy school. The DPT transition has slowed down the applications. Many schools are in great need for exceptional students. The standards have been lowered the past few years. This trend will continue as less people enter the field. The southeast has a great shortage of PTs and reimbursement can't compensate the salary demand for such a shortage.


Where the hell is Dr. Wagner or Docjay when you need him =). I think one said said there will be a 15% increase in application acceptance for med school and two new DO programs opening up. This is due to the shortage.

Southeast especially Arizona, New Mexico, or Las Vegas needs people bad..
 

Grue1some

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From BignastyPT

POPTS have been shown consistency in the research to overutilize PT services. This also true for radiology...

All professions, except for PT, cannot be owned by another profession. Hence, a PT cannot own a lawyer office. An MD cannot own an accounting firm. An accountant cannot own an MD office....you get the picture. Thus, professions are defined by who has "ownership" of the profession and how each professional is held accountable, usually be self regulation of a professional organization. POPTS bring up serious issues in this regard. If a profession does not have true ownership of the profession in this regard, it has no power or the ability to self govern. Ownership=automony. Ownership gives you the imput into the community. Ownsership gives you access. Without ownership, there is nothing.

POPTS practices that i have heard about or have interviewed with (just to check things out) or filled with incosistencies of practice. I had one POPTS ortho office tell that they triage the patients with good insurances and know that they will get better with minimal care to thier clinics while they refer patients out to clinics with complex conditions to the private practices because they know that they take a long time to get well and will get screwed on reimbursement.

Also, most MDs own PT practice for the sole purpose of revenue and do not understand what our services are or how to schedule/manage a clinc. That is why they see 4-6 patients an hour becuase they want more revenue. At least a PT owner understands how to deliever a good PT service.

MDs take advantage of young PTs who can make a little more money by seeing more patients per hour that is safe. You might make 5-10 grand more, but by thier willingness to get taken advantage of, your doubling the profits of the MD. Do you really want to work harder, provide worse care, and make pennies more for doing twice the work.

jkw01....i'm really disappoint in you, man. You seem to be on the side of every profession that is out screw us. POPTS to a signficant threat to private practices and the profession in general. This isn't about the money, this is about the ability of profession to have ownership of its services and control on how the services are provided. If don't get that, pharaceutical sales will probably make you more money than PT practice ownership!
 
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Grue1some

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Richard Scrushy, the rehabilitation king turned TV preacher, is trading his 92-foot yacht for a jailhouse bunk.

Pooling money from investors, Scrushy launched what became HealthSouth, which billed itself as the nation's largest rehabilitation company with some 2,000 locations worldwide. Reported revenues exceeded $3.5 billion.

By 2001, HealthSouth was the largest operator of inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation facilities, freestanding outpatient surgery centers, and freestanding diagnostic centers in the country. It had more than $4.3 billion in revenue and treated more than 100,000 patients a day. It had facilities not only in the United States, but also in Australia, Puerto Rico, the United Kingdom and Saudi Arabia. At this time, HealthSouth employed over 60,000 people and had well more than 2,000 locations in all 50 states.
 

PT2MD

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Richard Scrushy, the rehabilitation king turned TV preacher, is trading his 92-foot yacht for a jailhouse bunk.

Pooling money from investors, Scrushy launched what became HealthSouth, which billed itself as the nation's largest rehabilitation company with some 2,000 locations worldwide. Reported revenues exceeded $3.5 billion.

By 2001, HealthSouth was the largest operator of inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation facilities, freestanding outpatient surgery centers, and freestanding diagnostic centers in the country. It had more than $4.3 billion in revenue and treated more than 100,000 patients a day. It had facilities not only in the United States, but also in Australia, Puerto Rico, the United Kingdom and Saudi Arabia. At this time, HealthSouth employed over 60,000 people and had well more than 2,000 locations in all 50 states.


I'm not sure what this has to do with the original post, but knock yourself out.
 

CenteredDoc

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The reason for applying so much..
Physical therapy school is MUCH harder to get in than med school
Physical Therapy schools accepts 15-50 people while med schools accepts 100-200+ people.[/url]

Really? Then why don't all dpt applicants switch to medicine? MD make more money than DPT. So I guess despite the fact that pt schools are much harder to get in and that the rewards are less compared to med school, some people still choose to go into pt because they just love pt so much? I don't get it.
 

Grue1some

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Really? Then why don't all dpt applicants switch to medicine? MD make more money than DPT. So I guess despite the fact that pt schools are much harder to get in and that the rewards are less compared to med school, some people still choose to go into pt because they just love pt so much? I don't get it.


Thats why forums like this exist. My guess is that people are not informed or do not research enough before they get into the field. They do not realize until the middle of the program or 5 years down the line when they are working as a therapist. There are a few that love it. They breath it. They have a passion for it. I know of one~lol. Some decided well what the hell, I was injured before and maybe I should be a PT so I can help rehab others. Some just get in it just to do it. Some dont know what the hell they are getting themselves into until its too late. Some have a sports medicine or athletic training degree and want to do something a little more advanced.

A couple of PT's I talked to wished they did medicine or went to PA school instead of choosing therapy. If I would of found this forum 2-3 years ago then I would of focused my attention to do another health care profession that offered something better in terms of salary, education, and advancement.

I stumbled on this forum April 07 and started to ask questions about the niddy gritty of PT and it opened up my eyes. I guess I didnt research enough in terms of advancement and continuing education, but I did have a blast with volunteering in various settings and applying to programs.

I figured I write all the information I learned from my experiance b/c there isnt any other forum except rehabedge that shows good information. It will help someone who is interesting in therapy really think about what type of situation he or she is getting into before applying to a program. Save time and energy. Physical Therapy is a good profession, but there are other health professions that provide better opportunity. What seperates PT from other professions is the bond that a therapist gets with the patient. A dr can see a patient once every so weeks, while a therapist sees this patient for 3-4 days a week. You are more than a therapist to this patient. You are a friend, cheerleader, mentor, and educator. In some cases like in nursing home, the PT is like family.

I do not view this profession as a job. I view it as a privilege. It takes a special person to do physical therapy. There are lots of people that want to do it, but only a few have the heart and passion to do it or deal with the issues.
 

Grue1some

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I decided to post one more time just to say hi :laugh:. Started school like a month ago, so far loving it. Read a couple of new posts and laughed at the one that talked about getting into the most easiest PT school or how he couldnt find infomation on GPA/GRE stuff for each school, lol.

Some advice is try a new profession or just retake your classes or better do dam good on the GRE.
 

PTbecomingDDS

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Just apply to a ton of PT schools...you are bound to find one...I do not agree that PT school is harder to get into than med school...med schools might accept more students but they also receive a higher number of applicants than PT schools...so it all pans out in the end...basically most health professions requiring a graduate level degree are competitive; however, you might be able to find a school that has a lower number of applicants and might end up using their wait list as accepted students opt to go elsewhere...my GPA was a 3.05 (lowest in my entering PT class, Sci GPA 3.67, yes that high...EE major to kines and high level math becomes a gen ed course) so i was still able to get accepted to most of the schools that I applied (URI, VCU, Beaver, TJU, Nova)...the key is to research incoming class statistics and apply, apply, apply...spend the money, you are bound to find the right school!
 

sfgirl84

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With GPA's around 3.0-3.2, how many schools do you typically apply to? GPA is definitely an issue for me in applying, as my GPA is in the low 3 point-something range. Thanks! :)
 

PTapp

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I think there are some schools that accept 2.75, but 2.7 is a little bit too low for DPT and even 2.75 is the minimum requirement. Try to bring it up and then reapply if you don't get in. Good luck.
 

physio3

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Hi everyone, I came accross these forums and find them very helpful.
I recently graduated with a science undergrad degree from a Canadian Univ and Im looking into studying DPT in the States.
I only want to apply to places which dont require GREs. I found a list someone posted earlier with those schools, thanks. So my question is: after I finish DPT, what the heck am I in Canada since DPT here doesnt exist, physio is a masters program???? Am I gonna make the same money as a physio who got his/her masters degree from canada?
Also any tips on which schools in the States are easier to get into if I dont have a very high gpa?
Anyone know anything about D'youville college in Buffalo which offers DPT?
THANKS!:)
 

rkumar1

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well...my gpa wasnt great..it was approx a 3.2 at the time when I applied..and I got into a top ten PT school at the time. My GRE scores were actually pretty good though. I would suggest that you have killer essays, and are very good during your interview if there is one. Setting yourself apart from all other candidates by doing research on a faculty members research (in which you may be interested), a specialty offered only at their school, and finding background in general to faculty members and the school is a plus. Knowing how to talk the talk is very important as well, infact, i think it is the most important thing of all. Also, dont ask the typical questions that all students would ask in their interview session such as:

1) What sets your pt program apart from others ? (you should know this; you are applying to their school...lol)

2) Are the classes hard and/or time consuming?
3) Where are your clinical affiliations? (this one is getting old too)

...good luck and stay involved...maintain a positive attitude through the interview...and if there is a round table discussion, participate!!! become the center of attention!!! counterattack any argument, and try not to answer two different questions with the same response!!!!

For example: Question: Why do you see physical therapy as a good profession for you? versus What can you offer to physical therapy? - Be thorough but not redundant.
 

MinnDasota

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Apr 10, 2008
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  1. DPT / OTD
GRE (grduate records examination) is a pre-graduate school exam taken by some who plan on going to grad school. It's very general and not specific to any course of study in undergrad. Check out Wiki:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graduate_Record_Examination

As for PT vs med school, which is harder to get in? I would guess med school as the requirements are tougher in my mind. They may take more people but the GRE is nothing compared to the MCATs. Also, many get masters degrees in areas such as public health, etc to boost their chances of getting into a top 10 school (definitely not a typical route for a PT applicant).
 
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