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Several dumb questions..

Discussion in 'Psychology [Psy.D. / Ph.D.]' started by cambradface, Dec 20, 2008.

  1. cambradface

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    Thanks in advance for any clarification. I'm currently a junior in highschool.

    1) This will probably make people on this board cringe: I enjoy psych but am not 100% sure I'd want to go into it for a living, at least clinically. Is it possible (or be it at all common) for students to major in courses such as psych and then once accepted to a medical school, then have their residency in a completely non-related medical field? Is it possible, or to a lesser extent, frowned upon?

    and 2) What's the difference between a B.A. and a B.S. in a science course? I understand what the acronyms mean, but other than that I'm clueless.

    Thanks! :D
     
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  3. Rapunzel

    5+ Year Member

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    I'm not a medical student (master's level mental health therapists, and psychologists, do not go to medical school). However, my understanding is that if you want to go to medical school, it doesn't actually matter what you major in as long as you take the prerequisites for medical school. There are medical students who major in psychology, but they have to also take extra science classes. Also, plenty of people finish a bachelor's degree and then decide to do something different in graduate school. They may or may not have to take additional pre-requisite classes, depending on what they studied and what they are changing to. Broad interests can be a good thing.

    I'm not positive how universal this is, so someone correct me if there are differences. It doesn't matter what your major is as far as B.A. or B.S. The Bachelor of Arts degree indicates that the recipient has studied a language or languages, whereas that Bachelor of Science does not require studying a language. At other levels (Associate of Arts, Master of Science, etc.), I'm not sure what makes the distinction between arts vs. science. I'm getting a Master of Science degree because that is the only degree that was offered in the program that I was in. I have a Bachelor of Arts degree because I took some courses in Linguistics, Spanish, and Chinese, in addition to my major (Psychology).
     
  4. WannaBeDrMe

    2+ Year Member

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    I'm not sure I understand your question but generally, I'd say that BS degrees would require more science/math classes. For example, a BS in psychology might require extra electives in A and P, neuro, biochem, etc. The BA would require only the core psychology requirements and traditional liberal arts curriculum.

    For medical school, I think a BS would be more appropriate since you would get the exposure to more science pre-reqs. Medicine has post-bacc programs for people who grad with a BA and need to fulfill those requirements... but if you arleady know which direction you are heading, you could nip it early... financial aid will NOT cover post-baccs as a stand alone program. It must either be tied in to your next degree or lead to a separate degree (you can get a BS if you already have a BA or a BA if you already have a BS but finaid will not pay for 2 of the same)

    As for med school, psychologists don't go to med school, psychiatrists do and some psychiatric nurse practitioner programs are within medical schools.

    Good luck wiht your choices!
     
  5. cambradface

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    Yeah, I knew the difference between a psychologist and a psychiatrist, I'm not sure why I wrote that XD

    I'll clarify my question, then I promise I'll leave you all alone ;p

    Can I get my undergraduate degree in psychology, complete medical school, and then go into, say, Dermatology [or any other non-psych related field]?
     
  6. pingouin

    pingouin just chillin'
    Physician Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    Yes. The slate is wiped clean once you get into medical school. Undergrad major is irrelevant when applying to/interviewing for residencies.
     
  7. cambradface

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    OK, Thanks!
     

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