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SGU match list is up

Discussion in 'Caribbean' started by berkeleyboy, Apr 15, 2007.

  1. berkeleyboy

    berkeleyboy Senior Member

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  3. vett9d1

    vett9d1 Dazed and confused

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    Looks pretty good. Lots of IM, Peds and FP but that's the case with most US schools right? What exactly is a transitional year?
     
  4. berkeleyboy

    berkeleyboy Senior Member

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    I just noticed a cool feature of the sgu match list. On the top right corner you can actually search for what speciality you are looking for. Just type in urology and you'll see that there are currently 3 sgu residents in urology at various progams and post graduate training years.

    I got this from some website on transitional year....

    Students who have not yet made a career choice or specialty selection, or who are planning to serve in organizations such as the public health service, should also consider the Transitional Year Residency Program. Over the course of the year, the transitional resident gains exposure to a variety specialties and, at the same time, acquires the preparatory skills and knowledge vital to success in future clinical activities.

    Although the Transitional Year Residency qualifies for the first postgraduate year as defined by the American Medical Association, it is not intended to be a complete graduate education for the practice of medicine but as an entry into further specialization, including internal medicine and family practice.

    Unlike preliminary year medicine, the transitional year is fully funded by the government as a separate year and does not decrease funding to the subsequently chosen subspecialty institution. In this time of increasing fiscal concern among training institutions, this funding advantage for the transitional year is particularly important to the subspecialty programs where residents train after their transitional year. More important, only the transitional year is accredited by a separate resident review committee, insuring high standards for those programs meeting the requirements.

    I think that pretty much sums it up.
     
  5. Inkabellous

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    Good match list! Though I wish they made a distinction between categorical and preliminary positions (especially in surgery).
     
  6. Faze2

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    Saw some good programs in there. Peds at Geisinger. That's a good peds hospital. A lot of other good ones too. EM at Einstein. Hope they like gunshot wounds. I know I do. (from a learning standpoint. not a psycho or anything)
     
  7. berkeleyboy

    berkeleyboy Senior Member

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    Well...you can make a distinction if you look at the 2008 appointments. Just check to see if the person in the pgy-1 program you're looking at has a pgy-2 position in the 2008 match list.
     
  8. awdc

    awdc Senior Member

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    I'm more impressed with EM at Wayne State/Detroit Medical Center. Of course, I could be biased. ;) :D

    Seriously though, that's a great match list. Congratulations to all!
     
  9. Faze2

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    Oh I am definately biased.:D Live in Philly.:thumbup: Even have a few friends who work at Einstein's ER. It is crazy.
     
  10. helpfuldoc2b

    helpfuldoc2b Banned
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    Anyone know what happened to a student in that year that was suppose to be listed Inam Khan and why his name and residency position wasnt on there? How many of those students who started that year finished and how many had to decel, just curious...
     
  11. Wolf11

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    Could someone explain the difference between PGY1 and PGY2?? My understanding is that people in PGY are entering first year of residency right out of med school. While PGY2 are people who have done a year of residency and have applied for a different one after that year? Is that the case?? If it is how does it work? Do you keep your first year residency if you dont match in 2nd year???

    TIA

    Edit: Oops... just realized how old this thread was... lol... well it got a nice bump...
     
    #10 Wolf11, Mar 12, 2011
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2011
  12. ButImLETired

    ButImLETired Prodigal member
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    I can try and explain it, the older folks can correct me if I'm wrong.

    You have the basic idea right. PGY1 = post-graduate year 1, PGY2 = post-graduate year 2. But here's the thing. There are some specialties (radiology, anesthesiology, neurology, ophthalmology come to mind, but there may be more I don't remember) that require you to do one year of either Internal Medicine or Surgery residency BEFORE you can start your chosen field's residency.

    So let's take anesthesia as an example. In the US, if you want to go into anes., you have to match to a PGY-1 preliminary program in either internal medicine or surgery (your choice) AND into a PGY2-4 anesthesiology residency. Many times these are programs in totally different hospitals or even cities. And yes, when you're applying to one of these specialties, you have to also apply for individual prelim programs, interview, etc.

    Things are further complicated by the fact that some programs are entirely integrated so you can match to one hospital for all four years- but I'm pretty sure the first year is still considered a "preliminary" year.

    Another option for all of these advanced (PGY2) residencies for the PGY1 year is the "transitional year", which as far as I understand is a bit of a mix of medicine and surgery and it's super mellow, so transitional years (unlike preliminary years) are actually pretty hard to match into. So let's say that you want to apply for an anesthesiology residency. You might apply to a few integrated programs (PGY1-4 in the same hospital), a bunch of PGY2-4 anesthesiology programs, a bunch of PGY1 prelim programs, and a bunch of PGY1 "transitional year" programs.

    So a few days before Match day (might be tomorrow actually) you find out whether you have matched a prelim program, an advanced program (PGY2) or both. If you didn't match one or both, you enter the Scramble (which you may already know about, so Im not gonna go into it). So an accurate Match list should show where a student going into one of these specialties matched both for PGY1 and PGY2. Unfortunately, many match lists try to make it look like more people matched than actually did by using different lines for a PGY1 and a PGY2 position for the same person- which is dumb, cause the two things are related.

    Also, if you're not a great student and you didn't get into an advanced position, you may only have a prelim year spot. That should be clear in match lists as well, because prelim spots aren't very competitive while, say, radiology is. Those people generally try to do as well as possible during their PGY1 year and then they reapply the year after for a PGY2 position with a year of being a doctor under their belt. They can also apply for a different residency.

    Finally, PGY1-only prelim years can be used as a "last resort" for students who have to scramble in any specialty. So let's say you want to go into general surgery (which is an integrated specialty, meaning you start gen surg as a PGY1) but you don't match and you can't scramble into a surgery spot, or you don't even want to bother applying cause you know you're not a strong candidate. You may choose to scramble/match into a prelim surgery spot instead and reapply after that year with new recommendation letters and such.

    Ok, I think I covered everything. Sorry if I made things more complicated than they really are- I just was confused about this myself a while ago so I tried to explain it as well as I could.
     
  13. Gavanshir

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    I don't see any neuroserg but the rest looks right. Also it's worth mentioning that the derm, optah and rad onc matches are in Canada. We'll have to wait for more US results.
     
  14. PteFabulous

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    This is the list from 4 years ago. You might want to hold off on the applause until this year list is up. :p
     
  15. Gavanshir

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    Oops, well the results for Canada are up and the match representation is similar to four years ago minus neurosurg:

    Diagn Rad
    Dermatology
    ER
    FM
    IM
    Optho
    Ortho Surgery
    Psych
    Rad Onc
     

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