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DropkickMurphy

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I have a documented mild learning disability when it comes to math (but ironically enough I'm very good at picking out relationships in data so I am very good with statistics) and it has effected my chemistry grades, and I was wondering if this is something I should bring up in a personal statement. Any opinions?
 

Flopotomist

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I vote for not bringing it up for a few reasons.

1. Dwelling on a negative gets you stuck talking about negative things in your interview - not the impression that you want to make (assuming that you get a decent enough score on the MCAT)

2. You have done some amazing things (patent, RT, funeral home etc.) and frankly don't have room in your PS for extra bologna.
 
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sscooterguy

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I say do not bring it up during the interview unless you are directly asked about that chemistry grade. You can deflect it by saying you improved overall. I was never asked about grades during interviews. Be reactive as opposed to proactive in this subject.
If you get an interview, you probably have passed the requirements for that school, and acceptance will depend upon more on interview at that point, not one undergrad class.
As a side note, in the world of medicine, disability or not, the medical community can be pretty unforgiving. Many old school administrators think that if you have a disability, you better work through it, as your patient's lives will depend on you. Wait until after the first day of med school before you tell them about disabilities, unless of course you need special equipment/access. That's my long winded two cents.

sscooterguy
 

letmein!please?

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I also have a math-related disability, so I relate to ya. I vote for not saying anything about it because this is what I would think If I was your interviewer/adcom:

So this guy has a learning disability...and it affected his grade...and did he have accomodations like extended time? If yes, then this guy must really be skrewed if he has twice the time and still did sh*tty! If no... But they give accomodations to everybody these days! If it's not bad enough to get accomodations for, why is he telling me about it?"

It just seems too risky... they might think you won't be able to hack it, even though it wouldn't be anything "personal". Med school is tough, and you can't get extended time on the operating table (even though you won't be doing math problems ;) ) Or, they might think you are trying to manipulate or pull a fast one. On the other hand, they might be totally understanding too :rolleyes:
 

DropkickMurphy

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I don't think I will mention it unless asked. Thanks for your input guys.
 
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