ohlala

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In 2007, I graduated with a Masters in Pharmacology. I am currently in law school thinking that I was never really meant for medicine. However, I've decided life is too short to keep dreaming. I'm definitely retaking the MCAT.

My question to you all. Should I do a post-bac? I'm not sure whether I should do a SMP because I already have a masters. Is 2012 cycle too early to apply? I want to apply after I get called to the bar. Thanks. :love:
 
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DrMidlife

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Your GPA isn't great but it's not bad. I doubt that more coursework is the problem.

You need a great story for why you have collected all these degrees without finding a career, and legitimacy in your explanation for why you think you'll be happy in medicine when you aren't happy in law/pharm. I suggest that you will be a more mature and well-rounded med school candidate (not to mention adult) if you have a bit of a career before going back to school, such as working for 2-3 years in law. Med school is likely to run you $150k to $250k in additional student debt, unless you're independently wealthy.

Get above average on the MCAT. For MD schools average is 32. Against a less-than-competitive-but-not-bad GPA, the MCAT is an opportunity under your control to show excellence.

Put together a compelling app. Go for it or don't.

Best of luck to you.
 
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I agree with Dr. Midwife.... I only suggest you (quit your job/take leave of absence or whatever else you are doing) Sign up for a prep course and RETAKE THE MCAT. Shoot for at least a 28. NO POSTBAC. You have enough credits, that not the issue. What surprises me is applying twice with a subpar mcat and expecting miraculous things to happen the second go.

I think adcoms will understand your meandering path as long as you explain it. To me, it sounds like you may not have thought you were good enough or worthy enough, maybe in part due to the mcat score, maybe other things- but just know that it is really common for bright contemplative people to start a trail of negative self thought You are totally worthy of this and will do as well as you need to on the mcat IF you make the appropriate adjustments in your life.
 

jl lin

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I'd have to agree. Get the MCAT up and work on the rest of the app package.
 
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I'm not offering advice, I'm seeking it! I graduated with a BS in Biochemistry in 2002 and went immediately to law school, earning a JD in 2005. I've practiced law for 5 years now, and not going to med school has eaten away at me the entire time. Last year I made the decision to go for it, assuming that I would study and take the MCAT this spring. I've also been volunteering at a local hospital. Unfortunately, working full time as a lawyer in a law firm and trying to study for the MCAT, which covers material I learned > 10 years ago and have completely forgotten, has not been working out too well. I spoke to the head of a local post bacc program, and she advised that I should do a post bacc and retake the MCAT tested courses, and sit for the MCAT next year. I'm definitely leaning towards doing this -- other than the financial aspect (which is definitely a killer), does anyone see anything wrong with this?

Thanks!
 

DrMidlife

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I spoke to the head of a local post bacc program, and she advised that I should do a post bacc and retake the MCAT tested courses, and sit for the MCAT next year. I'm definitely leaning towards doing this -- other than the financial aspect (which is definitely a killer), does anyone see anything wrong with this?
Oh good lord. Not sure whether this person is selling her own program or just not a good adviser. On average premed advisers don't have perspective on nontrad strategy. By contrast, we have about a dozen former lawyers who frequent this forum.

Retaking coursework is about the least effective way to prep for the MCAT. I took physics in 1988, and got a 10 in PS in 2007 without retaking phys. If you did well in the prereqs 10 years ago, then imho you need to budget more prep time for content review, separately from test prep. A structured prep course (such as Kaplan) will give you access to full content review, and a boatload of materials. If you're disciplined, an online review program gives you max flexibility.

That said, you do need some current science coursework before you apply, so that you are showing fresh academic capability. Look for science in the evening, maybe biochem or genetics or anatomy/physio, and definitely get A's.

Best of luck to you.