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simple question about in-state

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by Mmeow, Aug 5, 2015.

  1. Mmeow

    5+ Year Member

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    I have a quick question about being in-state.
    How important is it to own a house to be in-state?
    and how big a factor is being an in-stater for med school acceptances?
    I know the in-state criteria are different for each state but I'm asking you in a general sense.

    The reason I am asking you this is that I heard that it is easier to get into state schools if you are instate and you don't really become instate unless you own a house AND work full-time.

    Technically, I am a citizen but my background is more like an international student.
    None of my parents work here and my family don't have a house in the states. I don't have any relatives here either. I went to high school in one state and college in another and am now living in a different state so I am not in-state anywhere. I started working full-time a few months ago but do not own a house (just paying rents for apt). My parents are considering buying a house (not only for this reason) but is it that of a big factor?
     
  2. Ad2b

    Ad2b SDN Gold Donor
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    Your IS is probably where you are working.

    No, ownership of a house does not mean IS necessarily. For FL, they would make you OOS in a heartbeat; you have have substantial proof of ties for over a year.

    You could probably claim the state you went to college as substantial ties and where you live now as IS. anything else is subterfuge, to me.
     
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  3. Lawper

    Lawper not actually a cube
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    That's probably it. IS would mean establishing a residency in a state based on where you work, not home ownership. I'm pretty sure OP would have to update his driver's license, vehicle registration etc. with the new state he's currently in.

    OP, if you remain in the new state where you currently work for at least a year, you can claim IS. The state where you went to college would warrant as having strong ties.
     
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  4. y123

    Verified Account 7+ Year Member

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    Some states will treat you as a resident as long as you live here, have an address and pay bills.
     
  5. mw18

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    I'll leave the residency requirement talk to those who know more. But OP, as for acceptances, at most public medical schools your state of residence couldn't be more important. Some schools only accept residents (Mississippi, and eastern Carolina come to mind), and many accept 80-90% of their class in-state. The other 10-20% are usually pretty highly qualified. Some of the more highly regarded public schools have ratios that are slightly more favorable. For example, I think Michigan's matriculants are about a 50/50 split but the number of applicants still make it an uphill battle.

    Private schools generally don't care at all what your state of residence is. Mercer wants GA residents only, but otherwise I can't think of any.
     

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