Doctor Bagel

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shameful, i know, but i dread the idea of doing research and keep on reading about its importance with residency applications. will i be screwed if i don't do research and want to match in something like psych, obgyn or pm&r, or if i want to do im with a fellowship in say rheum? just wondering. also, if research is a must, how easy is it to do at either umdnj-som or dmu, especially for someone like me with no research background whatsoever?

yeah, i've got nothing better to worry about. :)
 

Neurodropout

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exlawgrrl said:
shameful, i know, but i dread the idea of doing research and keep on reading about its importance with residency applications. will i be screwed if i don't do research and want to match in something like psych, obgyn or pm&r, or if i want to do im with a fellowship in say rheum? just wondering. also, if research is a must, how easy is it to do at either umdnj-som or dmu, especially for someone like me with no research background whatsoever?

yeah, i've got nothing better to worry about. :)

I'm a 3rd year now, and from what I've seen, research isn't a necessity for the fields you've mentioned. If you want a residency slot at a really competitive academic institution, research would be helpful.

I did research at DMU over the summer between my first and second year. It was mostly bench research, and a little bit of work with rats. It's pretty easy to find a professor who is doing a project and work in their lab. There are some paid positions and scholarships associated with doing research, and you have to apply and compete for those. If you're willing to work for free, I don't see a problem finding someone to work with.

Good luck
 

Beau Geste

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You can always do research on a clinical topic, such as service delivery models, efficacy of care, simlarities in patient history for X complaint, etc. After you design your research, you can just collect data during your clinicals, write it, and publish.

At least that would be my advice to those uninterested in research but wanting the extra on the CV.
 
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Megboo said:
You can always do research on a clinical topic, such as service delivery models, efficacy of care, simlarities in patient history for X complaint, etc. After you design your research, you can just collect data during your clinicals, write it, and publish.
Sounds like good one to do if you aren't interested in doing any bench research. Research isn't always done in labs.
 

Doctor Bagel

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yes, bench research is what sounds particularly horrible to me. i'm one of those people who actually quit being a chem major precisely because i hated lab so much. i'll have to look into the more clinical stuff, but it's good to hear it's not a necessity for what i want to do.
 

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exlawgrrl said:
yes, bench research is what sounds particularly horrible to me. i'm one of those people who actually quit being a chem major precisely because i hated lab so much. i'll have to look into the more clinical stuff, but it's good to hear it's not a necessity for what i want to do.

Same here. I quit my Ph.D. program because I did NOT want to do bench research.
 

OSUdoc08

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exlawgrrl said:
shameful, i know, but i dread the idea of doing research and keep on reading about its importance with residency applications. will i be screwed if i don't do research and want to match in something like psych, obgyn or pm&r, or if i want to do im with a fellowship in say rheum? just wondering. also, if research is a must, how easy is it to do at either umdnj-som or dmu, especially for someone like me with no research background whatsoever?

yeah, i've got nothing better to worry about. :)

You don't need to do research to get into primary care (i.e. IM). I'm not sure about the other areas.

I don't plan to do research to get into ER, although I know that I will be required to do some research once I enter residency.
 

docbill

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You suck... exlawgirl...

Research of all kind, especially basic science is GREATTTT.. and only for the strongest... YOu are $#%!^


Okay now that the boss is gone, each person likes their own thing. Since you are a lawyer. You can do so called ''research'' in medical ethics/ law/ access/ human rights also if you wish!!

So research can mean a lot of thing. But either way with your law degree you have an advantage of some sort.

I do basic research, but I would like to do clinical research while in med school. I want to be an academic physician/scientist so that would be my cup of tea.

x
 

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UMDNJ-SOM has student research available during the summer between first and second year. You get to pick a project and if selected (a lot of people apply and a lot are accepted) you conduct research with a doc and try to publish or at least present at a conference (all projects are presented at our own research day).

if selected you'll also get paid to do the research and it's a great way to get to know faculty and learn about a certain field. it is definitely not mandatory to do but is a great way to show your interest in something and could possibly help out with residency (especially in competitive fields).

The other option (no matter where you go to school) is to hook up with a doc in a field you're interested in and do a case report. this in most cases is easier to accomplish (i.e. requires less time) and is more likely to land you a publication as first author.

good luck!

-J
 
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