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So when a conducing loop of wire passes though an external magnetic field

Discussion in 'MCAT Study Question Q&A' started by m25, 10.30.14.

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  1. m25

    m25

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    So when a conducing loop of wire passes though an external magnetic field, current is induced. My question is, will the time vs. induced current graph going to look different for a circular vs. recutangular shaped wire? If so, how will they look like?
     
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  3. Cawolf

    Cawolf 2+ Year Member

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    Induced current is proportional to area, not shape.

    So I would imagine that the loop of larger area would be shifted up on the current axis by a value proportional to area.
     
  4. m25

    m25

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    But isn't induced current proportional to the change in the area of the wire that's entering the external magnetic field? So I figured a square or rectangular wire loop will have a uniform change in magnetic flux(because of its shape) and thus have constant current, whereas a circular loop will first have increasing magnetic flux and then a decreasing magnetic flux as it enters and leaves the external magnetic field, making the current vs. time graph look like a semicircle.
    I've posted a graph of current vs. time for both rectangular and circular loop wire to show you what I mean. Am I on the right track?
     

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