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Solid Clinical Ph.D. programs with Neuropsych Emphasis?

foreverbull

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I've had students approach me about how to round down the exceedingly long list of APA-accredited clinical PhD programs, some interested in neuropsych paths in particular. Some of you neuropsych folk are far more familiar with those kinds of programs in the Midwest and lower cost of living areas, so would you provide some suggestions for reputable programs in low- to mid- COL areas?

I tried to do a search for a list of decent neuropsych-emphasis programs here but wasn't able to find much other than questions about a specific program.

Thank you in advance!
 

WisNeuro

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UWM amd Marquette in Milwaukee have good neuro coursework and access to great practicum experiences. U of Minnesota has ok emphasis on Neuro, access to good VA practicum, and very high concentration or boarded peeps. Michigan State gutted their neuro offerings some years back, not sure if they've done anything recently to make that adequate again.
 
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erg923

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This is hard because I think I would want to know more about the specific goals of the applicant beyond clinical Ph.D with maybe some neuropsych opps?

The middle-ish parts of the country have plenty of good programs and many that have ubiquitous neuropsych training and opportunities. The neuropsych component could literally be accomplished by dozens of programs in the area. I'm sure most of these recommendations will be relatively idiosyncratic or tied to the responders direct knowledge/experience with the programs (which may be out of date).

In terms of locations that are particularly cost-effective... so to speak:
University of Louisville-Louisville, Kentucky
University of Kentucky-Lexington, Kentucky
University of Cincinnati-Cincinnati, Ohio
The Pennsylvania State University (if having very strong academic aspirations)-State College, Pennsylvania
Indiana University (if having very strong academic aspirations)-Bloomington, Indiana
 
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jdawg2017

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I would say U Florida is low cost area in Gainesville. They’re a neuro power-house down there.

Ohio state is good I think... I don’t know a ton about it but met a few grad student folks from their program at INS this year who seemed happy and productive.

UT Southwestern in Dallas has reputable faculty and has gotten some good students out, but their stipend structure (unless it has changed) is not ideal; you are basically paying to go the first few years, and then the stipend isn’t much in the later years.

Something to consider is that in high COL areas (maybe San Francisco being the exception) the stipends are up-adjusted. Back when I applied in Boston and Southern California, stipends were about 30-35k a year. Living in a high COL coast city now, it’s not a TON of money, but it is doable if you live within your means. For me, having the wide array of neuropsych training sites was worth it for the cost tradeoff.
 

AcronymAllergy

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I'm not as overly-familiar with the midwest, but I know the University of Iowa has a strong neuropsych history (e.g., Benton's stomping grounds). However, I don't know how integrated their hospital system is with their graduate program. They're also a PCSAS site (in addition to APA), so pretty research-intensive.
 

Berry0770

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I've had students approach me about how to round down the exceedingly long list of APA-accredited clinical PhD programs, some interested in neuropsych paths in particular. Some of you neuropsych folk are far more familiar with those kinds of programs in the Midwest and lower cost of living areas, so would you provide some suggestions for reputable programs in low- to mid- COL areas?

I tried to do a search for a list of decent neuropsych-emphasis programs here but wasn't able to find much other than questions about a specific program.

Thank you in advance!

On the website for the Society for Clinical Neuropsychology, they have a list of neuropsych programs at the PsyD and PhD level :)
 

PsyDr

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On the website for the Society for Clinical Neuropsychology, they have a list of neuropsych programs at the PsyD and PhD level :)

Prior to HCG, there were PhD programs in neuropsychology. From about 1999-2003, these programs slowly phased out of labeling the degree “neuropsychology” And transitioned into granting phds in “clinical psychology”. I’m guessing the scn data is showing the old neuropsych programs.


Bigler isn’t fully retired. He also has a very lucrative secondary business.
 

WisNeuro

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I sometimes wonder if the doc program is too early to specialize. I haven't found it to be a significant barrier to people getting into good to top tier internships, fellowships, and subsequent faculty positions with neuro/rehab focus. Just food for thought.

While I do think pursuing a coherent research line from the start is great, I am a big proponent of starting out as a well-rounded psychologist in every area before specializing late in your training. Even when I'm looking at applicants for more neuro-oriented spots, if they don't have somewhat solid therapy experience, it's a huge knock on rank. You have to be a good psychologist before you can be a good specialist.
 
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