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Some Questions for the Ladies

Discussion in 'Women in Healthcare' started by samisab786, Dec 4, 2008.

  1. samisab786

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    Haha.
    Alright, I'm going to introduce myself before going on my inquiry-rampage.
    I only started college a couple of months ago, but I'm trying to research a couple of careers just to see what I may possibly be interested in future. I'm currently in a pharmacy program, but I'm not sure about it. I'm also interested in medicine-I think the kind of knowledge and background employed in medicine really interests me and the fact that work revolves around people. I have a couple of annoying questions if any of you may be willing to kindly answer.

    1.As mothers, future mothers, or women in general, you probably know that you will need time in the future for a family. I hear about people quitting their pre-medical studies/etc. because the job requires long hours and gets frustrating. However, I've also read on this forum and others that some women work part-time and found their careers to be very satisfying. Are the hours in medicine a really huge object?

    2.Why did you pick medicine? Like what do you look forward to in a career?

    3.I want a career in which I can ultimately be happy to go to work. I know every career eventually gets boring and routine, but what really attracts me to medicine are the academic subjects involved in it. Is that just a "pre-med" fantasy or do some of you really like the work involved in what you do?

    I'm pretty much the kind of person that likes to learn something and be able to apply it somewhere. That's why even though I was considering a career in higher ed (like a P.Ed) or something, I just don't feel like I can apply any particular academic subject in what I do. That's why I am considering medicine or pharmacy. In addition, I think having the knowledge of a physician/pharmacist, etc. there are eventually a lot of opportunities available (ie: writing for newspaper, medical corresponding, etc.) Have any of you looked for other ways to use the background needed for a health professional?

    That's all I'm going to ask now. I'd really appreciate some honest answers. I'm having a little bit of an emotionally distressful time in college for a variety of reasons, so I'm just trying to see what I may or may not be interested in, even though I won't be certain until a few more years.

    Thank You.
     
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  3. NonTradMed

    NonTradMed Perpetual Student
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    1.As mothers, future mothers, or women in general, you probably know that you will need time in the future for a family. I hear about people quitting their pre-medical studies/etc. because the job requires long hours and gets frustrating. However, I've also read on this forum and others that some women work part-time and found their careers to be very satisfying. Are the hours in medicine a really huge object?

    It's a balancing act but doable. Find a female mentor to give some insight into it. Many female doctors I know who had husbands with well paying jobs worked part time at some point in their lives. Most also had nannies to help around the house. I think having a demanding career in medicine is doable if you have a supportive spouse and the resources to get help when you need it (housekeeping, nanny, etc). The cool thing about medicine is that while it keeps you busy, it pays you well enough that you can splurge on a housekeeper to come in for a weekly cleaning.

    2.Why did you pick medicine? Like what do you look forward to in a career?

    I look forward to doing something emotionally and intellectually rewarding and that is a financially secure job. Although we all have different definitions of what constitutes as 'rich', I consider a doctor's salary to be 'enough' for me and my family to live on comfortably. It's a well respected job, portable, recession proof and fairly easy to find a job in most areas of the country.

    3.I want a career in which I can ultimately be happy to go to work. I know every career eventually gets boring and routine, but what really attracts me to medicine are the academic subjects involved in it. Is that just a "pre-med" fantasy or do some of you really like the work involved in what you do?


    Only you can answer this question. I suggest doing some shadowing with different doctors to see if this is what you want to do.
     
  4. paxieplay

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    For the past 27 years, I have been a physician's assistant in New York City and received my training and license in the Army.

    7 of those years, I spent trying out different specialties, until I found the one or two I was most interested in.

    I was a single mom of three children, two of which I put through college.

    My primary specialty was Cardio-Vascular, Thoracic surgery. My secondary specialty was Psychiatry, which was on a part-time basis.

    The salary for both was just fantastic and I was able to raise my kids, put them thru college and buy them cars on that salary, along with supporting myself in a style most people dream of.

    I loved my work and woke up every morning glad to have the jobs I had, and still have time with my kids.

    I quit the psychiatry specialty and devoted most of my life to cardio-vascular and thoracic surgery working privately for one doctor who was wonderful to work for. He allowed me to do all of his post-op and pre-op patients in our 3 offices and do rounds for him in 4 hospitals. Working in a hospital was out of the question for me because of my kids. Being on call and wearing a beeper was not the thing for me.

    There was not one day that I didn't look forward to working with patients on a one to one basis, and my psychiatry skills helped enormously with grieving parents, children and wives and husbands. So I was in the best place, at the best time for me.

    You need to check out different specialties when the time comes for you to act, so that you can pick and choose which one will make you look forward to getting up in the morning. I wish you much luck...Flo
     
  5. binko

    binko At home I want you to call me Dr. Marvin.
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    I look forward to having children one day once I've become established in my chosen field.

    Actually my desire to someday bear children and my desire to be a doctor stem from the same place – I want to be an OB/GYN partly because I want to bring children safely and happily into the world. And because I want to prevent children from being brought unsafely and unhappily into the world.

    I don't know if I'd feel the same way if I were male. I'm guessing not, because my personal experience as a female has sensitized me to issues of gender and reproductive health in a way I'd probably be oblivious to without those particular experiences.
     
  6. mededu

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    That's the bottom line. Do something that is of your interest and which you actually enjoy doing. Then only you will be able to reach at the peak of your career.
    Since you have considerable time at your hand, would it be possible to shortlist your career options and then may be just get a feel of it and then take your final decision.

    Wish you luck!
     
  7. free09

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    I think pharmacy is very family-friendly, first of all, if you complete a BA+PharmD straight out of high school, you will only be 26. And some options take even less time, ex. my friend did a 2 yr AA followed by a PharmD..she is only 24 and a pharmacist.

    24, 26...both are young...even if you work for five years, you still have time to have children. And the bonus is you would have no loans by this point. You could also continue working 1 day a week to stay current. This is easily done in retail, especially in big chains like Walgreens.
     
  8. xscpx

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    This is actually something I never think about. Honestly, I have no intention of having children. I went through pregnancy once and that was more than enough for me. I have cats and enough poop to clean as far as I'm concerned. Whether or not I change my mind as I get older, it had absolutely no affect on my career choice.


    I chose public health. I love the idea of working in medicine without being a medical doctor. I also love research, but not so much people. I would take being alone in my lab that having to see patients any day! I hope to work for the CDC in epidemiology and hopefully will find a job that isn't just computer work but has a lab work component.

    This, I think is one of the most important things. Practicality, is another major one. Being happy, having $$$$$$ in loans, and not being able to find a job is not good. With either pharmacy or medicine you should be good in the job department, so you should focus on what you like. Try shadowing pharmacists and doctors to get a better ideas. The careers are totally different.

    All in all, I wouldn't let ideas about future family and such make your decision. Do what it is you want. If later you want children you will find a way to make it work. Everyone does. :) Make yourself happy and comfortable first. You have plenty of time to work everything out!

    Best of luck to you! :)
     
  9. DrNush

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    i know you said medicine or pharmacy.
    but if u want a flexible hours (difficult in medicine), making a difference, family life, no on-calls and patient contact (which you most likely won't get much of in pharmacy), and good money (average is somewhere AROUND 120 grand a year) u may wanna check out dentistry.
    just a thought. :)
     

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