Sports on the Professional Level

KindaHadTo

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Jun 12, 2020
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Hi.

I am wondering how medical schools would perceive experience playing sports on the professional level (playing for pro club/playing for country in international games; btw this is not college sports, this is a bigger stage). Would this be of a benefit, and how so and how much of a benefit?

Thanks,
KindaHadTo
 
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akg0119

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OP, I would strongly recommend not using your real name anywhere on this forum. If you set your username to be your real name, you can change it by going to your account (upper right corner- click on your username, then click account details). You can also edit your post to remove your name from it.
 
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KindaHadTo

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Jun 12, 2020
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OP, I would strongly recommend not using your real name anywhere on this forum. If you set your username to be your real name, you can change it by going to your account (upper right corner- click on your username, then click account details). You can also edit your post to remove your name from it.
Done!

Thanks for your comment.
 
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harvard_of_the_west

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I'm sure it'd look good! I guess by the time you've gotten yourself to that level (where pro athletics actually becomes a viable career option) from collegiate athletics, you've probably done enough athletics and have enough accolades to stand out in admissions. So I'm not sure if pushing matriculation off a few years (which can complicate things like the MCAT) will be necessary and/or that much more beneficial. But I never got myself past the collegiate level and never really had the desire to go pro, so I can't totally speak to that.

The vast majority of HS student athletes don't make it into college athletics. And the vast majority of college student athletes don't make it into the pro ranks (not the semi-pro level where only a little money is made, I'm talking BIG leagues). If you have that kind of talent, you should weigh the potential earnings from a pro contract against lost years of work as an attending. You should also consider how long you can maintain your athletic career without forgetting everything from undergrad so that you can still rock the MCAT. And remember, an MCAT score is only useable for 3 years. Good luck!!
 
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DarklingThrush

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Hi OP! My sport doesn't have a professional level, but I was a collegiate athlete and then trained at an elite level post college. I had closed file interview and MMI interviews so I was never asked about it, but it gave me A LOT to talk about! My interviewers were always impressed! I think it's impressive by itself, but even more impressive if you can talk about it in a way that relates to how it will make you a better doctor in the future (i.e. highlighting your leadership skills, resilience and self-accountability skills etc.)

I had mediocre stats from undergrad, a solid post bacc and a very sad MCAT and was admitted MD. I really believe it was due to my athletics and my exemplary writing skills (I was an english major) that I received interviews, and it was due to my interview performances that I was accepted. Know how to advertise yourself, and highlight your strengths and it will pay off!
 
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lumya

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N=1 but one of my good friends transitioned from professional ballet to dentistry and she demonstrated the same discipline and commitment she had for ballet in her grades and test scores. She wrote extensively about the parallels in her personal statement and was accepted to basically everywhere she applied. Obviously she had the stats of a great applicant, but her background really demonstrated that she’s able to handle the rigor of dental school.
 
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Hi.

I am wondering how medical schools would perceive experience playing sports on the professional level (playing for pro club/playing for country in international games; btw this is not college sports, this is a bigger stage). Would this be of a benefit, and how so and how much of a benefit?

Thanks,
KindaHadTo
Professional athlete scholars are RARE and Admissions Deans have a massive soft spot for them. My school has never had anyone who was a pro, but I believe that our LizzyM has had some at her school. We've had a few Olympic athletes, at least.
 
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Tyrese

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Hi OP! My sport doesn't have a professional level, but I was a collegiate athlete and then trained at an elite level post college. I had closed file interview and MMI interviews so I was never asked about it, but it gave me A LOT to talk about! My interviewers were always impressed! I think it's impressive by itself, but even more impressive if you can talk about it in a way that relates to how it will make you a better doctor in the future (i.e. highlighting your leadership skills, resilience and self-accountability skills etc.)

I had mediocre stats from undergrad, a solid post bacc and a very sad MCAT and was admitted MD. I really believe it was due to my athletics and my exemplary writing skills (I was an english major) that I received interviews, and it was due to my interview performances that I was accepted. Know how to advertise yourself, and highlight your strengths and it will pay off!
You're last statement is very much true! Often times an application hinges on how well it is framed. Hence why some 3.8+ sGPA/520+ MCAT applicants get denied, but those of lower stats get it. It's all about how you carry yourself.
 

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Hi.

I am wondering how medical schools would perceive experience playing sports on the professional level (playing for pro club/playing for country in international games; btw this is not college sports, this is a bigger stage). Would this be of a benefit, and how so and how much of a benefit?

Thanks,
KindaHadTo

You kind of instantly become the most interesting person to interview that day. It brings instant credibility to your work ethic and motivation. Plus, I imagine you have some wicked good stories.

David D MD - USMLE and MCAT Tutor
Med School Tutors
 
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aa7777777

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I've been suffering from major self-doubt these past few days while writing my secondaries & was searching for someone in a similar boat as me. I've been a professional athlete for the past 3 years & am applying this cycle! This thread has seriously bolstered my confidence - we really do have a unique story to our path to medicine. Although I may have a hole or two in my app compared to most traditional applicants, hopefully my experience & specific values will help fill the gap. Thanks for this!
 
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