SUNY-Downstate questions...

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by arch, Oct 26, 2000.

  1. arch

    arch Member

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    I realize that some schools are more receptive to non-trads. I was wondering if anyone knows if SUNY-Brooklyn is one of these schools. My application has been complete there since August but I havent heard from them yet. My stats are aver.
    mcat: 10-11s, gpa: 3.4/3.53 sci/ns
    ...however I'm currently working as an architect(my undergrad. degree). But I have lots of exp. clinical/non-clinical/research.
    Does anyone have any insight regarding the student body at this school and my chances?
    Thanks!
     
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  3. turtleboard

    turtleboard SDN Advisor

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    The average age for the most recent entering class was 24, as was my class. The average age for the current MS3 class is 25.

    My opinion is that the school isn't more receptive to non-traditional applicants than most medical schools, and I base this on the fact that the average age for entering classes at MD medical schools is about 25, and that puts Downstate a little on the young side.

    The school is concerned about both numbers and personality, so if you have the right mix, I think you'll have a good shot. Your recent MCAT is a little below the average at the school, but your 1996 MCAT was a little above the average. [​IMG] Your GPA is hovering somewhere within the average for matriculated students.

    Your record of extracurrics sounds good.

    Email me more if you have any questions about the school, the curriculum, or just wanna shoot the breeze.

    Tim of New York City.
    (MS2 at the Downstate College of Medicine, home of the largest Yankees vs. Mets brawl)
     
  4. Eric

    Eric Member

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    I am somewhat of a non-trad student and I was just recently accepted at SUNY DownState. When I went for the interview they seemed really interested in the things I have done with my life outside of school. I hope that helps.
     
  5. arch

    arch Member

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    Thanks for your replies. However,
    there is one more layer of complication to my application. I have only been living in New York state for two years. Previously I was a California resident. I wonder if the adcoms are suspecting "Hillary-Clinton Senate-hopeful-carpetbagging" like tactics in my desire to seek admission.


     
  6. turtleboard

    turtleboard SDN Advisor

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    Well, living in New York State doesn't make one a resident. I think the requirement is six-years as a NYS tax payer? Anyone know for sure?

    And like all state schools, the four SUNY medical schools show a preference for NYS residents and its class demographics typically show 97-98% coming from the Empire State.


    Tim of New York City.
     
  7. arch

    arch Member

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    wow then I have 4more years of tax paying. hmmm.

    ...yeah, living somewhere and calling it home are different things i guess. I might be going back to cali.

    thanks for your reply. good luck to you!
     
  8. turtleboard

    turtleboard SDN Advisor

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    You should definitely check with the admissions office at any of the SUNY schools to find out more. In my class there are two out-of-state students, one from TX and the other from CA.

    But if you ask around among the non-traditional students, you'll find that most were from states other than New York originally but moved here and became carpetbaggers. [​IMG]


    Tim of New York City.
     
  9. gower

    gower 1K Member

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    The common rule, used in many states to determine residency, is you must live in the state for at least one year, not be a FULL-TIME student (less than 12 credits/semester),
    pay state taxes. If there is a question about that, you may be asked to show utility bills, etc.

    SUNY Brooklyn interviews a very small number of non-state residents and accepts few of them. Of 650 interviewed for 1997-98 first year class, 12 were out-of-State.

    The 1997 entering class attended 60 different colleges. 44% women. 14.5% undererpresented minorities. Age range: 20-42, mean age of matriculants: 23.5. Mean GPA: 3.58. Mean MCAT: VR 9; PS 10; BS 10.
    1997 class: 180, 1 Out-of-State
     
  10. turtleboard

    turtleboard SDN Advisor

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    Scary. Where'd you get all that?


    Tim of New York City.
     
  11. gower

    gower 1K Member

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    The information came from Medical School Admissions Requirements, US and Canada. Published by Association of American Medical Colleges. My data came from the 49th Edition, 1999-2000. There is a 50th Edition out. There are 2 pages for every medical school plus several chapters of general info: The Nature of Medical Education; Options for Individuals Considering a Career in Medicine; Premedical Planning; Deciding Whether and Where to Apply to Medical School; MCAT and AMCAS; The Medical School Application and Selection Process; Financial Information for Medical Students; Information for Minority Groups Students; Information on Medical Schools Offering Combined College/MD Programs for High School Students. Then the 2 page entries for each US and Canadian Medical School.
    Much of the information for each school is general (as it has to be) but gives accurate information. There are are addresses, phone numbers, FAX numbers, and email addresses for amisions offices. Each school says what its application and Admission Policies are. There is a table, Information on --- Entering Class, where my data came from.

    The Premedical Advisors office should have a copy because AAMC sends a free copy to advisors who are members of the National Assoc. of Advisors for the Health Professions. A college library or bookstore may have copies. And anyone can buy a copy.

    There are similar publications available for dental, optometry, and podiatry schools.

    A reminder: all the info is general, accurate, gives an idea what each school is looking for. But like any average, it conceals the variance. Really, only your premed advisor with knowledge of you and previous applicants from your college may be in a position, based on experience, to judge where you may be a viable candidate. If Harvard, for example, were to say that the range of GPA among admitted students was from 3.1 to 4.00, don't get too excited. There is a reason, unknown to us, why a particular student with 3.1 was accepted. Similarly, at the other end of the scale, not all 4.0 students will even be interviewed, let alone accepted. And Harvard nor any other medical school is going to tell us because there are so many factors considered in decision making. Because applicant A is accepted with, say 3.2, doesn't say whether you or anyone else with 3.2 will be accepted. Therefore, exercise prudent caution when someone you know nothing about says he/she was accepted to any particular med school.
     
  12. arch

    arch Member

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    Tim,

    thanks for your replies to my questions. You seem to know a lot about D.O. programs also.
    I was wondering what your thoughts are about the D.O. schools in California. TUCOM is looking very attractive to me since I'm originally from San Franciso (and I'd be very happy to be a D.O. I'm not too concerned about the whole MD vs. DO thing) But I understand TUCOM is new and sketchy.
    thanks...
     
  13. turtleboard

    turtleboard SDN Advisor

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    I believe both TUCOM and Pikeville are the two most recently established DO schools, and so I'd give them a while before actually enrolling. The great problem with many of the newer DO schools is that they haven't matted down their clinical program, and many of their students are left scrambling to find suitable rotation sites. I can't be sure what the situation is at either TUCOM or WUCOMP, so I can't comment specifically, but in general I'd try to stay away from the newer schools -- NO offense meant to those attending the newer institutions because, as it were, they are fine schools in their own right, but they haven't reached their full potential just yet.

    The advice I'd offer to anyone looking at DO schools today is to scrutinze their clinical program. Find out what hospitals are affiliated with the school, and if the institution doesn't have any affiliated hospitals (rare if not impossible) keep away.

    Some other med students may not agree with me, but the clinical portion of your education is one of the most important pieces to your career as a physician. Not only will what you learn in the third and fourth years generally stay with you throughout your career (basic sciences come and go in a flash), but residency directors will choose their future residents based on the grades attained in rotations and giving some consideration to where the student took the rotation.

    I'll take a look at the TUCOM and WUCOMP websites and get back to you with my opinion.

    Tim of New York City,
    home of the World Champion NEW YORK YANKEES
     
  14. turtleboard

    turtleboard SDN Advisor

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    Website presentation aside, I think WUCOMP has the upper hand over TUCOM simply because it appears to be a more established institution. They apparently now have a very close and very formal relationship with Arrowhead Regional Medical Center, which is somewhere in CA, so that's a step in the right direction. WUCOMP has also been able to establish satellite clinic campuses throughout the area, and even one in Las Vegas, NV. I see no such activity with TUCOM, but that could be just their failure to update their website. TUCOM seems to list "affiliations," but says nothing about any of the hospitals with which they're apparently affiliated.

    I'd stay away from SFCOM because 1) it's a relatively new institution, having been established, I believe, only about four years ago, 2) it doesn't appear to have anything firmly in place for your clinical education as an osteopathic physician, 3) there's no mention of how their students and graduates do on the COMLEX boards or in getting choice residencies.

    While I'm not such a fan of the heavy primary care bent of WUCOMP (I think they mention something on the order of 22 rotations in "primary care), your education seems to be a lot better organized there than it would be at TUCOM.

    Tim of New York City.

    [This message has been edited by turtleboard (edited 11-02-2000).]
     
  15. Sheon

    Sheon Senior Member

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    As a member of the most recent class at Downstate, we were told that about half of our class was over thirty. This was contradictory to another piece of information they gave us saying the average age of our class was 24.

    However, you can take piece in the idea that I can think of at least 20 people who are over 30 in my class (including myself).

    Good luck.
     
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  17. turtleboard

    turtleboard SDN Advisor

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    Sheon,

    You would obviously know your class a heck of a lot better than I, but from the looks of it your class seems a lot younger than mine!

    Tim of New York City.
     

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