Aug 18, 2016
3
0
Status
Pre-Medical
Pharmacology, the fundamental aspect of pharmacology are drugs. Each individual drug can be categorized by name (generic and brand name), class, indications, dosage range, notable side effects and metabolism.

I have taken a pharmacology class and I did rather well, but I'd like to know as much as I can about drugs, if not everything.

What is or are the most effective study methods in order to remember nearly all pharmaceuticals while being able to explain them in detail? Is there a specific system, brand? What about the best flashcards for remembering what you learned studying pharmacology.
 

ldiot

2+ Year Member
Oct 7, 2015
1,619
922
Miami, FL
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Best system is grouping them into class. For example if you know one statin then you know them all
 
Jan 12, 2016
35
8
Status
Pharmacist
My personal opinion on how to memorize them:
Start with the class of drugs (e.g. ACE-Is, beta-blockers, statins, SSRIs etc.). Next, look at the general side effects and general indications of the entire class (e.g. beta-blockers are commonly used for systolic heart failure and have the general side effect of bradycardia). Then within that class, look at which ones have unique side effects/interactions/features that others in the class don't have (e.g. carvedilol is a unique beta-blocker because it also has alpha-blocking effects and can have a larger effect on reducing blood pressure). I wouldn't worry too much about doses.
 
  • Like
Reactions: BidingMyTime

BidingMyTime

Lost Shaker Of Salt
10+ Year Member
Oct 2, 2006
3,667
2,741
Illinois
Status
Pharmacist
It's like anything, the "best" way will differ from person to person, depending on each person's unique learning style. You can get ideas from others, but ultimately you will have to experiment to figure out what works "best" for you. Since you did well in your pharmacology class, I'd think about how you studied for that, and then maybe just refine or tweak your technique, rather than trying something completely different.
 

no_future

2020? SERIOUSLY?
Aug 25, 2016
7
5
Status
Pharmacist
I seriously suggest reading a few textbook chapters for each class / disease state. Find some good explanation that clicks with you. Powerpoints suck generally.
 

RxVampire

PharmDruggist
2+ Year Member
Oct 12, 2015
787
756
Status
Pharmacist
Organize them by class/MOA & do subgroups if plausible (chemical structure backbone, enantiomers, generations, secondary mechanisms, etc.) or dose equivalencies (PPI, HMG CoA RIs, loop diuretics, etc.). Indication grouping can be helpful as well...I.e. Beta blockers with migraine prophylaxis.