1. Visit this thread to beta-test StudySchedule.org. StudySchedule is a free nonprofit site that builds dynamic MCAT study schedules unique for your needs and timeline.
Check out the new Application Assistant, where you can calculate your LizzyM score, see how you rank compared to other applicants, and see a list of schools where similar students were accepted.

TBR Bonding?

Discussion in 'MCAT Study Question Q&A' started by Sammy1024, May 15, 2014.

  1. SDN is made possible through member donations, sponsorships, and our volunteers. Learn about SDN's nonprofit mission.
  1. Sammy1024

    Sammy1024

    701
    58
    Dec 12, 2013
    What is it called when something splits? Is it called dissociation?

    Ex: HCl -> H+ + Cl-
    Ex: NaCl -> Na+ + Cl-

    It's been bugging me since yesterday but I didn't know where to really look for it since it's kind of random.
     
  2. SDN Members don't see this ad. About the ads.
  3. Teleologist

    Teleologist 2+ Year Member

    610
    158
    Jul 7, 2013
    on your 6
    It's called heterolytic bond cleavage when you break something up and the divorce settlement does not allocate electrons equally between the two newly unweds.
     
  4. Sammy1024

    Sammy1024

    701
    58
    Dec 12, 2013
    Thank you so much! :]
     
  5. Teleologist

    Teleologist 2+ Year Member

    610
    158
    Jul 7, 2013
    on your 6
    Look for it in my mind (;.
     
    Sammy1024 likes this.
  6. Sammy1024

    Sammy1024

    701
    58
    Dec 12, 2013
    I wish I could look into your mind for all my MCAT question when I take it! lol!
     
    Teleologist likes this.
  7. DrknoSDN

    DrknoSDN

    450
    104
    Feb 21, 2014
    Not to dig up an already answered thread, but your examples seems more like Decomposition reactions (chem term?). Decomposition seems more spontaneous than cleavage, but outside of that it probably depends on the lexicon of your field.
    [edit] Could also be called an "ionization reaction" for those examples?
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemical_decomposition

    Ripped From the following website:
    http://misterguch.brinkster.net/6typesofchemicalrxn.html

    3) Decomposition: A decomposition reaction is the opposite of a synthesis reaction - a complex molecule breaks down to make simpler ones. These reactions come in the general form:
    AB ---> A + B
    One example of a decomposition reaction is the electrolysis of water to make oxygen and hydrogen gas:
    2 H2O ---> 2 H2 + O2
    [Edit] Shortened post.
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2014
  8. Teleologist

    Teleologist 2+ Year Member

    610
    158
    Jul 7, 2013
    on your 6
    This is the most useless list I've ever saw. This is for high schoolers on AP exams. I have never had to classify a reaction using any of the terms on this list save "combustion" and "acid-base" and even the latter is too broad to be of any use. Lewis acid/base reaction? Bronsted-Lowry acid/base reaction?

    The OP's reaction represents 1) heterolytic bond cleavage and 2) ionization if you prefer. Note that it should be obvious that heterolytic bond cleavage of a molecule should produce ions.
     
  9. DrknoSDN

    DrknoSDN

    450
    104
    Feb 21, 2014
    The OP question was: "What is it called when something splits?"
    Two examples were provided but there are many ways to describe how something can split.
    If the question was "What are these reactions called?" I wouldn't link extra info.

    Also i'm not sure if you noticed but the second example (NaCl) is ionic and has very little covalent character. So calling it "heterolytic bond cleavage" would be quite a stretch as the electrons weren't really 'shared' to begin with.
    "Dissociation" of the ionic nature of the crystal lattice structure would be a more accurate name for that example.


    ...Honestly i felt like you were going to challenge that statement so I went to the source. :D
    IUPAC Compendium of Chemical Terminology - the Gold Book ==> http://goldbook.iupac.org/index.html

    Their definition...
    heterolysis (heterolytic):
    "The cleavage of a covalent bond so that both bonding electrons remain with one of the two fragments between which the bond is broken."


    Basically not everything is as simple as you were implying. =P
    Or maybe IUPAC is wrong, who knows.
    You could try and convince me that NaCl is covalent, but yeah... ;)

     
  10. Teleologist

    Teleologist 2+ Year Member

    610
    158
    Jul 7, 2013
    on your 6
    You're right, for the second example, that's dissociation or ionization, but it was referring to the first example in my last post.

    I'm sure you'd fall for a lot of other unicorns ;).
     

Share This Page