akimhaneul

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For this question, if the fluid's density was increased, to get the same effect, shouldn't you increase the force on the piston?
Answer is d.

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bobeanie95

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Apr 19, 2016
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The force that is applied on the right side exerts a pressure on the system, as indicated by P1=F1/A1. On the right side the pressure will be P2=F2/A2. In regards to fluids the pressure will be conserved so the equations relate by F1/A1=F2/A2. Changing the density won't affect the pressure since it only depends on the force and area.
 
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akimhaneul

2+ Year Member
Dec 2, 2015
438
23
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
The force that is applied on the right side exerts a pressure on the system, as indicated by P1=F1/A1. On the right side the pressure will be P2=F2/A2. In regards to fluids the pressure will be conserved so the equations relate by F1/A1=F2/A2. Changing the density won't affect the pressure since it only depends on the force and area.

Thanks! Just trying to make sure I got this...if the density is higher, wouldn't the buoyant force that opposes the force on the piston be higher? Because of this, don't you have to exert a greater force on the piston?
 

bobeanie95

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Apr 19, 2016
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Pre-Medical
Buoyant force applies to when you have an object immersed in a fluid medium, such as a rock in water or a balloon in air. Both will experience a buoyant force that depends on the volume of the fluid that they are displacing. In this case, the piston isn't really being immersed in the fluid, rather its just pushing it.
 
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