BMBiology

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In 2017:

(1) 2 years of residency for a "clinical" position
(2) 1 year of residency for a hospital position
(3) > 33% of the new graduates will be unemployed or underemployed

I will bump this thread up in 2017 to see if I am right.
 

awval999

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In 2017:

(1) 2 years of residency for a "clinical" position
(2) 1 year of residency for a hospital position
(3) > 33% of the new graduates will be unemployed or underemployed

I will bump this thread up in 2017 to see if I am right.
I mean there will always be exceptions but yes, about right.

Also:

(4) The testing scam that is the BCPS will continue to have huge y/y growth in pharmacists sitting for the exam as current practicioners scramble to "look good"
(5) 3 years intern experience to receive community/retail job with the chains, or the famous "community residency scam"
(6) Salaries still only ~$50/hr (will be ~$50/hr in 2027 too)
 

cjhrph

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Speaking of unemployed. We had a pharmacist asking to be hired as a tech today in our shop because he's been out of work for over a year and can't find anything. We've had about three of these over the last 6 months, but this is the first that was willing to work for $10 hr as a tech.

This saddens me....
 

cjhrph

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Ny
 

awval999

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Speaking of unemployed. We had a pharmacist asking to be hired as a tech today in our shop because he's been out of work for over a year and can't find anything. We've had about three of these over the last 6 months, but this is the first that was willing to work for $10 hr as a tech.

This saddens me....
Lol.

Doesn't the guy realize that doing something like that sets off about a hundred loud, blaring sirens.

Damn, just move out to middle of nowhere Texas. Better quality of life than working for $10/hr in NY.

Something is clearly wrong with his background-- Honestly, if I couldn't find work in 6 months I'd be out in bum-**** nowhere with a job. Better than living in a city with only unemployment.

More likely the candiate screwed up badly.
 
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thephoenician88

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I think the entire pharmacy curriculum needs to change.

1) I think it needs to be harder to get in
2) I think EVERYONE should be required to go through a PGY1
3) I think rotations should give everyone a general idea of what's available in pharmacy and not be overly clinical and vice versa

We would all be much better candidates for ANY position, including retail, if we had great experiences. Unfortunately we all have different APPE experiences and a PGY1 should get us all rolling at the same level. Just look how confident PGY1 MD's are, sometimes they don't know what they're doing, but they still know enough to keep chugging. Sometimes I wonder if some pharmacists can do the same.
 
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BMBiology

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I think the entire pharmacy curriculum needs to change.

2) I think EVERYONE should be required to go through a PGY1
Even if you are planning to do retail, you should also require to do a residency?
 

thephoenician88

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Even if you are planning to do retail, you should also require to do a residency?
YES!!!

There are too many pharmacists out there in retail that just let things slide or let DUR's slide. Maybe they don't understand the significance of it and maybe it can help improve their priorities and time management while working.
 
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BMBiology

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YES!!!

There are too many pharmacists out there in retail that just let things slide or let DUR's slide. Maybe they don't understand the significance of it and maybe it can help improve their priorities and time management while working.
Spoken like a true student. Have you worked in retail before?

It doesn't make sense to me they would do a residency at a hospital or a managed care if they want to do retail. So, where would these pharmacists do their residency? At CVS, Walgreens?
 

Digsbe

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Where are all these new residencies going to come from? As it is they are currently very limited and very competitive. No one should have to go through pharmacy school, earn their PharmD and then not be able to get a job because they couldn't get a residency especially since the majority of grads don't do a residency only only around half that apply actually get matched. There aren't nearly enough for everyone to have one and not everyone wants to do one.
 

Farcus

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May be the big chains can all have a pgy1 residencies and make it a requirement. This way the chains will have +1 pharmacist to a 1 pharmacist shift but only pays less than half of a pharmacist salary.
 

confettiflyer

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In 2017:

(1) 2 years of residency for a "clinical" position
(2) 1 year of residency for a hospital position
(3) > 33% of the new graduates will be unemployed or underemployed

I will bump this thread up in 2017 to see if I am right.
Heh...33% unemployment? Even construction worker unemployment only hit 16%. I don't know of any validated methods to ascertain underemployment, though.

My prediction: eventually no more "hospital/dispensing" pharmacists, all tech check tech and decentralized clinical pharmacists + 1 centralized rph to handle high risk compounding.

Or robots...lots of robots.

Maybe not 2017 though.
 

thephoenician88

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Spoken like a true student. Have you worked in retail before?

It doesn't make sense to me they would do a residency at a hospital or a managed care if they want to do retail. So, where would these pharmacists do their residency? At CVS, Walgreens?
these words mean nothing. I've worked retail for 6 years and as an intern I counsel or attempt to counsel every new patient, even if it's as simple as "take with food."

PGY1 residencies are fairly generalized, you get a taste of everything and become more competent in most areas. How do they expect pharmacists to perform MTM's if they don't have a good base?

saying that "someone just wants to work at walgreens" is very limiting to their future.


Where are all these new residencies going to come from? As it is they are currently very limited and very competitive. No one should have to go through pharmacy school, earn their PharmD and then not be able to get a job because they couldn't get a residency especially since the majority of grads don't do a residency only only around half that apply actually get matched. There aren't nearly enough for everyone to have one and not everyone wants to do one.
Residencies will develop as the pharmacy profession becomes more clinical. I feel they should be inpatient pgy1 with mix of ambulatory care or split with retail. It should make a pharmacist competent enough to enter retail/hospital/clinical and then ANY pharmacist could enter ANY area of pharmacy they're interested in and switch later because they've had the experience.

This is all just an idea, just my opinion. I'm not saying it's going to happen tomorrow just like the OP doesn't know what will happen in 2017.
 
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BMBiology

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Heh...33% unemployment? Even construction worker unemployment only hit 16%. I don't know of any validated methods to ascertain underemployment, though.

My prediction: eventually no more "hospital/dispensing" pharmacists, all tech check tech and decentralized clinical pharmacists + 1 centralized rph to handle high risk compounding.

Or robots...lots of robots.

Maybe not 2017 though.
33% unemployed or underemployed. Robots? They are already here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oumlYbwfAsI
 
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wucool33

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May be the big chains can all have a pgy1 residencies and make it a requirement. This way the chains will have +1 pharmacist to a 1 pharmacist shift but only pays less than half of a pharmacist salary.
Lol great, let's give the big chains more ideas to not pay us... Are u related to one of the big Chain's CEO?
 
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BMBiology

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Don't think it can't happen to pharmacy?

"It's a problem well documented by the nursing industry. About 43% of newly licensed RNs still do not have jobs within 18 months after graduation, according to a survey conducted by the American Society of Registered Nurses"
http://money.cnn.com/2013/01/14/news/economy/nursing-jobs-new-grads/index.html?iid=HP_MPM

The profession of pharmacy is heading into the same direction as nursing and law. Low admission standards. Diploma mills.
 
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BMBiology

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these words mean nothing. I've worked retail for 6 years and as an intern I counsel or attempt to counsel every new patient, even if it's as simple as "take with food."
You don't need to do a residency in order to be good at counseling. It's not that difficult. I am assuming you are good at counseling right? And you are still an intern.

Pharmacists don't counsel as much not because they don't know how but because they don't have the time. No residency is going to change that.

May be the big chains can all have a pgy1 residencies and make it a requirement. This way the chains will have +1 pharmacist to a 1 pharmacist shift but only pays less than half of a pharmacist salary.
Great idea. Same work but just less pay. LOL!
 

awval999

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Heh...33% unemployment? Even construction worker unemployment only hit 16%. I don't know of any validated methods to ascertain underemployment, though.

My prediction: eventually no more "hospital/dispensing" pharmacists, all tech check tech and decentralized clinical pharmacists + 1 centralized rph to handle high risk compounding.

Or robots...lots of robots.

Maybe not 2017 though.
We really don't even check anything anymore except for boluses. We have PYXIS and stuff.
 

awval999

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Don't think it can't happen to pharmacy?



http://money.cnn.com/2013/01/14/news/economy/nursing-jobs-new-grads/index.html?iid=HP_MPM

The profession of pharmacy is heading into the same direction as nursing and law. Low admission standards. Diploma mills.
From the article:

At the same time, enrollment in nursing colleges has exploded in recent years. In the 2010-2011 school year, 169,000 people were enrolled in entry-level baccalaureate nursing programs. That's more than double the 78,000 students from a decade earlier, according to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing.

There just aren't enough jobs to go around for all these new grads.


----------------------------------------------------

Sounds so familiar.

If anything though, it proves that salaries are sticky to an extent, RN's still get $50-60K. There will just be stagnant wages and very limited opportunites.

It is much easier to open a nursing school than a pharmacy school. I mean there are barely 169,000 pharmacists in the whole country (around ~250K i think); they are pumping out that many RN's A YEAR!
 

MindOverMatter

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I think the big chains would be all for retail residencies. They would get to have a Pharm D in their store and only have pay ~1/3 of the salary.

 

Digsbe

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these words mean nothing. I've worked retail for 6 years and as an intern I counsel or attempt to counsel every new patient, even if it's as simple as "take with food."

PGY1 residencies are fairly generalized, you get a taste of everything and become more competent in most areas. How do they expect pharmacists to perform MTM's if they don't have a good base?

saying that "someone just wants to work at walgreens" is very limiting to their future.




Residencies will develop as the pharmacy profession becomes more clinical. I feel they should be inpatient pgy1 with mix of ambulatory care or split with retail. It should make a pharmacist competent enough to enter retail/hospital/clinical and then ANY pharmacist could enter ANY area of pharmacy they're interested in and switch later because they've had the experience.

This is all just an idea, just my opinion. I'm not saying it's going to happen tomorrow just like the OP doesn't know what will happen in 2017.
How are you able to counsel as an intern when you are pre-pharmacy? I know that state laws differ, I'm just curious. I know in my state it is illegal for a tech to counsel on any item and someone can only begin working as an intern once they are enrolled and have started classes in a pharmacy school and only under the direct supervision of a pharmacist.

Not all PGY1 residencies are generalized. Most clinical/hopital based ones will be similar in that they have you rotating through different clinical sites, doing projects, and other such things, but there are also PGY1 residencies that are more compounding and community oriented.

Why does a pharmacist need to be prepped to enter any area of pharmacy? Why does someone who never wants to do clinical or set foot in a hospital have to do a residency when their goal is to work in a chain or open up their own independent? I'll agree that residencies will continue to develop along the lines of a possibly increased need/market for clinical pharmacists, but I highly doubt that there will be a requirement that every graduate do a residency and that retail chains will require one. If anything so of the chains may make you work at a cut salary for the first year and call it a "community residency" but you are essentially working as a pharmacist without pharmacist pay in a "residency" that isn't focused at training you or teaching you new skills. You would essentially be nothing more than a cheaper R.Ph. for a year. There may be some bigger changes if pharmacists are granted provider status under Medicare, but even then those changes will take too much time to implement in order to have a system where there is a residency for all new grads by 2017 and that all new grads will need one in order to get a job.
 

thephoenician88

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How are you able to counsel as an intern when you are pre-pharmacy? I know that state laws differ, I'm just curious. I know in my state it is illegal for a tech to counsel on any item and someone can only begin working as an intern once they are enrolled and have started classes in a pharmacy school and only under the direct supervision of a pharmacist.

Not all PGY1 residencies are generalized. Most clinical/hopital based ones will be similar in that they have you rotating through different clinical sites, doing projects, and other such things, but there are also PGY1 residencies that are more compounding and community oriented.

Why does a pharmacist need to be prepped to enter any area of pharmacy? Why does someone who never wants to do clinical or set foot in a hospital have to do a residency when their goal is to work in a chain or open up their own independent? I'll agree that residencies will continue to develop along the lines of a possibly increased need/market for clinical pharmacists, but I highly doubt that there will be a requirement that every graduate do a residency and that retail chains will require one. If anything so of the chains may make you work at a cut salary for the first year and call it a "community residency" but you are essentially working as a pharmacist without pharmacist pay in a "residency" that isn't focused at training you or teaching you new skills. You would essentially be nothing more than a cheaper R.Ph. for a year. There may be some bigger changes if pharmacists are granted provider status under Medicare, but even then those changes will take too much time to implement in order to have a system where there is a residency for all new grads by 2017 and that all new grads will need one in order to get a job.
I wasn't an intern till I started pharmacy school and took me a while to be confident enough to counsel regularly.

I just don't like the notion of starting in one area and getting stuck in it. If pharmacy were more standardized, we could jump into any field we wanted at any point.

Also my idea is a different type of residency that would incorporate maybe 70% clinical/hospital and 30% retail. You would get your knowledge from inpatient treatments and get your people skills/ time management from retail.

Again, just a thought. What would be so wrong about having a pharmacist watch over you for a little while, it's just a year. Don't forget, the patient's safety and life is IN YOUR HANDS.
 

spacecowgirl

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I don't think you understand the work that goes with having an accredited residency.

awval - agree with you about BCPS.
 

Hope1974

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Well, I'm ready to stand on the corner in a busy intersection with a sign that says "unemployed pharmacist"
 

Its Z

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1995 was the last year of difficult job market before the pharmacy boom. I'm a c/o 1995.
There were 3 walmart openings and Savon took 13 from our class. Walmart didn't even respond to my application and Long's turned me down after an interview because I was underqualified since I've only done 4 years of pediatric internship at Childrens LA.

Ahh.. blessing.

I see the future of pharmacy with a different set of perspectives.

For those fittest will enjoy a long, productive, and professionally fulfilling pharmacy career in a healthcare setting leading the practice of pharmacy through this century.

For those who never leave the comfort zone while taking the path of least resistance will get left behind the fast running bullet train of ever changing healthcare landscape.

Everyday I see creative pharmacists finding a niche who are rewarded handsomely.

Cream rises to the top.

That's how it is.

1996 to 2006 pharmacy job market in the US was an aberration not the norm.

I'm excited about the changes in health system pharmacy practice where pharmacists are looked upon as the medication expert not only clinically but in regulatory, quality, and financial arenas.

80-20 rule applies.

The top 20% will lead the bottom 80%.

You decide and choose which percentile group you want to be in.

It's your choice, not mine.

Don't take my word for it. You go out and do it.

And bookmark it.

:smuggrin:
 

Doctor M

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1995 was the last year of difficult job market before the pharmacy boom. I'm a c/o 1995.
There were 3 walmart openings and Savon took 13 from our class. Walmart didn't even respond to my application and Long's turned me down after an interview because I was underqualified since I've only done 4 years of pediatric internship at Childrens LA.

Ahh.. blessing.

I see the future of pharmacy with a different set of perspectives.

For those fittest will enjoy a long, productive, and professionally fulfilling pharmacy career in a healthcare setting leading the practice of pharmacy through this century.

For those who never leave the comfort zone while taking the path of least resistance will get left behind the fast running bullet train of ever changing healthcare landscape.

Everyday I see creative pharmacists finding a niche who are rewarded handsomely.

Cream rises to the top.

That's how it is.

1996 to 2006 pharmacy job market in the US was an aberration not the norm.

I'm excited about the changes in health system pharmacy practice where pharmacists are looked upon as the medication expert not only clinically but in regulatory, quality, and financial arenas.

80-20 rule applies.

The top 20% will lead the bottom 80%.

You decide and choose which percentile group you want to be in.

It's your choice, not mine.

Don't take my word for it. You go out and do it.

And bookmark it.

:smuggrin:
Great post Z. Inspirational!
 

Its Z

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Great post Z. Inspirational!
Hey Doc!

My buddy bought a 911 TT... now, that's inspirationally fast...otherwise stupid fast! :thumbup:
 

Digsbe

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I wasn't an intern till I started pharmacy school and took me a while to be confident enough to counsel regularly.

I just don't like the notion of starting in one area and getting stuck in it. If pharmacy were more standardized, we could jump into any field we wanted at any point.

Also my idea is a different type of residency that would incorporate maybe 70% clinical/hospital and 30% retail. You would get your knowledge from inpatient treatments and get your people skills/ time management from retail.

Again, just a thought. What would be so wrong about having a pharmacist watch over you for a little while, it's just a year. Don't forget, the patient's safety and life is IN YOUR HANDS.
Ah, I didn't know that you had started pharmacy school.

Personally, I think that APPE's do enough training to qualify someone to do retail and work in a hospital. For clinical pharmacy I can see why residencies are needed and personally I will be applying for one when I graduate. However, I think that a well rounded APPE program will expose someone to enough of the pharmacy world to qualify them to do retail and hospital staffing, I just don't see the need to mandate a new type of residency that would train a pharmacist to work in any role outside of something that may require a PGY2.
 

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owlegrad

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Ah, I didn't know that you had started pharmacy school.

Personally, I think that APPE's do enough training to qualify someone to do retail and work in a hospital. For clinical pharmacy I can see why residencies are needed and personally I will be applying for one when I graduate. However, I think that a well rounded APPE program will expose someone to enough of the pharmacy world to qualify them to do retail and hospital staffing, I just don't see the need to mandate a new type of residency that would train a pharmacist to work in any role outside of something that may require a PGY2.
I had the same thought, that description of a "split" residency sounded an awful lot like APPE to me...
 
5

525329

YES!!!

There are too many pharmacists out there in retail that just let things slide or let DUR's slide. Maybe they don't understand the significance of it and maybe it can help improve their priorities and time management while working.
Residency is a waste for retail. No offense.
 
5

525329

1995 was the last year of difficult job market before the pharmacy boom. I'm a c/o 1995.
There were 3 walmart openings and Savon took 13 from our class. Walmart didn't even respond to my application and Long's turned me down after an interview because I was underqualified since I've only done 4 years of pediatric internship at Childrens LA.

Ahh.. blessing.

I see the future of pharmacy with a different set of perspectives.

For those fittest will enjoy a long, productive, and professionally fulfilling pharmacy career in a healthcare setting leading the practice of pharmacy through this century.

For those who never leave the comfort zone while taking the path of least resistance will get left behind the fast running bullet train of ever changing healthcare landscape.

Everyday I see creative pharmacists finding a niche who are rewarded handsomely.

Cream rises to the top.

That's how it is.

1996 to 2006 pharmacy job market in the US was an aberration not the norm.

I'm excited about the changes in health system pharmacy practice where pharmacists are looked upon as the medication expert not only clinically but in regulatory, quality, and financial arenas.

80-20 rule applies.

The top 20% will lead the bottom 80%.

You decide and choose which percentile group you want to be in.

It's your choice, not mine.

Don't take my word for it. You go out and do it.

And bookmark it.

:smuggrin:
I agree with the "pharmacists need to be creative" to find their own niche. I see nontraditional roles increasing in the years to come. I've known many pharmacists who had the luxury of creating their own startups as consultants, CME specialists, remote informatics, etc. Soon, the clinical knowledge acquired in pharmacy school will make sense. :thumbup:
 

Its Z

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Nice! Went to the mall and saw a beautiful 911 Carrera in a show room! $103,000. Then i thought to myself how nice it would be to take that $103,000 and throw it down toward another business. Then maybe i can get one of these:

http://www.thesupercars.org/fastest-cars/fastest-cars-in-the-world-top-10-list/
Those cars are some extreme! Truth is...I dont really have the need for speed. I prefer a gentle drive with an occassional spirited pounding of the tight turns with the top down. Buddy has been bugging the chit out of me to go with him to a driving school down in monterey bay..
 

joetrisman

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Those cars are some extreme! Truth is...I dont really have the need for speed. I prefer a gentle drive with an occassional spirited pounding of the tight turns with the top down. Buddy has been bugging the chit out of me to go with him to a driving school down in monterey bay..
My buddy did one of the schools down in fl. Said they started him out in a dodge neon and would step it up in performance until he was driving a viper at the end. I forget what all they had him do, but one was taking a car through a large wet parking lot, intentionally spinning it out, and teaching him to correct it when spinning out. Sounds like a blast
 

Its Z

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Its $650...and I have to use my car...I probably should do it to learn how to really drive my car. I did almost kill myself once ...its goofy how you can lose control in a rear heavy car.
 

Doctor M

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Its $650...and I have to use my car...I probably should do it to learn how to really drive my car. I did almost kill myself once ...its goofy how you can lose control in a rear heavy car.
I have been meaning to go to Seabring here in florida. I still havent driven the M yet like i should. Waiting for maybe a GT500 in the future as a daily and drive bejesus out of the M!!!
 

rph3664

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This thread is Reason #467,813 why I am glad I did not have children, and was able to retire early.

:D
 
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Sparda29

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Those cars are some extreme! Truth is...I dont really have the need for speed. I prefer a gentle drive with an occassional spirited pounding of the tight turns with the top down. Buddy has been bugging the chit out of me to go with him to a driving school down in monterey bay..
Agree, I don't care too much about top speed. But I need that crazy pushing you back into your seat acceleration. I'm not happy if the 0-60 isn't under 4 seconds.

My current car, the Scion FR-S has so much potential. With like $15,000 in modifications, it can dominate on the racing circuit. Turbo kit, cold air intake, intercooler, exhaust, coilovers, fatter tires, and do some weight reduction to the car.

The end result would be around 400 horsepower in a car that weighs 2400 lbs.
 
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BMBiology

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(5) 3 years intern experience to receive community/retail job with the chains, or the famous "community residency scam"
I have to slightly disagree with this. You don't have to work three years for them but you have to be one of their top interns
 

All4MyDaughter

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I have to slightly disagree with this. You don't have to work three years for them but you have to be one of their top interns
And I was also referring to what I think will happen in the future.
Seems to be written in present tense to me. :shrug:

Besides, the chains are already only hiring their top interns, at least in most areas.
 

awval999

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I have to slightly disagree with this. You don't have to work three years for them but you have to be one of their top interns
I agree with you in part yes; they will hire their best interns, even with less experience if they are better than the ones with more experience. I'm just trying to say you need to stand out.
 
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Residency is a waste for retail. No offense.
I think there is a general misperception of what community residents actually do. For example, the residency program I am in partners with a college of pharmacy. Therefore, I am on campus generally two days per week. This time is spent preparing and giving lectures, leading small group discussions, participating in committees, working with student organizations, etc. The other three days a week I am at my practice site. While it is classified as a community pharmacy residency, my time is split between a community pharmacy and a medical practice. I provide clinical services at both locations.

However, the majority of my time is spent developing new clinical services. I have learned a ton of new skills related to developing collaborative relationships with other providers and payors, how to market services to various stakeholders, how to train other pharmacists to provide services, etc. I like being the principle investigator on a community wide study I designed and implemented. It's nice to be offered the opportunity to speak at conferences about new programs that I developed and am being paid for (and yes, it was really me that developed them, not the company or my preceptor). Oh, I forgot to mention - I spend <1 hour/week providing traditional dispensing services (I sometimes cover lunch so the other pharmacists can get a break).

Having said all of that - yes, if I was spending most of my time dispensing, residency would be a waste. If I wanted to be a "traditional community pharmacist," residency would be a waste. But, if someone is interested in learning about program development, wants to start their own business, wants to teach, etc., residencies help to open doors.
 

kwakster928

A Legal Drug Dealer
10+ Year Member
Jun 10, 2004
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1995 was the last year of difficult job market before the pharmacy boom. I'm a c/o 1995.
There were 3 walmart openings and Savon took 13 from our class. Walmart didn't even respond to my application and Long's turned me down after an interview because I was underqualified since I've only done 4 years of pediatric internship at Childrens LA.

Ahh.. blessing.

I see the future of pharmacy with a different set of perspectives.

For those fittest will enjoy a long, productive, and professionally fulfilling pharmacy career in a healthcare setting leading the practice of pharmacy through this century.

For those who never leave the comfort zone while taking the path of least resistance will get left behind the fast running bullet train of ever changing healthcare landscape.

Everyday I see creative pharmacists finding a niche who are rewarded handsomely.

Cream rises to the top.

That's how it is.

1996 to 2006 pharmacy job market in the US was an aberration not the norm.

I'm excited about the changes in health system pharmacy practice where pharmacists are looked upon as the medication expert not only clinically but in regulatory, quality, and financial arenas.

80-20 rule applies.

The top 20% will lead the bottom 80%.

You decide and choose which percentile group you want to be in.

It's your choice, not mine.

Don't take my word for it. You go out and do it.

And bookmark it.

:smuggrin:
Well said. You took words right out of my mouth.
 

nafcillin

10+ Year Member
Aug 13, 2008
285
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Pharmacist
Right now it seems like pgy2 grads are the preferred candidates for the jobs at my hospital. Even staffing ones!
 
5

525329

I think there is a general misperception of what community residents actually do. For example, the residency program I am in partners with a college of pharmacy. Therefore, I am on campus generally two days per week. This time is spent preparing and giving lectures, leading small group discussions, participating in committees, working with student organizations, etc. The other three days a week I am at my practice site. While it is classified as a community pharmacy residency, my time is split between a community pharmacy and a medical practice. I provide clinical services at both locations.

However, the majority of my time is spent developing new clinical services. I have learned a ton of new skills related to developing collaborative relationships with other providers and payors, how to market services to various stakeholders, how to train other pharmacists to provide services, etc. I like being the principle investigator on a community wide study I designed and implemented. It's nice to be offered the opportunity to speak at conferences about new programs that I developed and am being paid for (and yes, it was really me that developed them, not the company or my preceptor). Oh, I forgot to mention - I spend <1 hour/week providing traditional dispensing services (I sometimes cover lunch so the other pharmacists can get a break).

Having said all of that - yes, if I was spending most of my time dispensing, residency would be a waste. If I wanted to be a "traditional community pharmacist," residency would be a waste. But, if someone is interested in learning about program development, wants to start their own business, wants to teach, etc., residencies help to open doors.
Indeed. What I meant was that if all that you wanted to do was retail (which a lot of pharmacy students seem to go into schooling for), a mandatory residency would be severely wasted in time and money. You are correct though that a residency would otherwise provide useful training, allowing one to do more diverse things. :thumbup:
 

awval999

New Member
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Oct 30, 2005
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Right now it seems like pgy2 grads are the preferred candidates for the jobs at my hospital. Even staffing ones!
That's like saying the sky is blue.

Why wouldn't a PGY2 be preferred over a new-grad?

I see Washington is your location? Is this Seattle perhaps? Any major metro is going to have their choice of excellent candidates because large metropolitan cities are more desirable than rural counterparts.

Its also the case that many people once they get comfortable and start having a family; ie: ages 30+ they rarely move around. So really the competition for new jobs is between candidates ages ~24-29. Would a 30 year old with BCPS, 7 years experience and excellent recs be competitive vs. a new grad or a PGY1; of course, it's just unlikely such a competition would come up.

PGY2's are almost always going to be more desirable than new grads, the only problem with them getting a staffing position is that they are "overqualified" for staffing and may not get the job because the employer doesn't want to risk losing them if something better opens up.

I really think the ideal spot is a PGY-1-- unless you want to unicorn; the problem of waiting an extra year to get it is that with every year the job market gets worse and worse and if you can score a job as a new grad (staffing or hybrid) I'd go for that.