Quantcast

The Steps to Becoming an Ophthalmologist

This forum made possible through the generous support of SDN members, donors, and sponsors. Thank you.

Are these the correct steps to become an ophthalmologist?

  • This university is great for the programs you have listed...

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    2

SIMRAN2345

New Member
Joined
Nov 9, 2015
Messages
2
Reaction score
0

Members don't see this ad.
Hey everyone!
I am actually 15 years old and I am interested in becoming an ophthalmologist but I am puzzled at what I should do to finally achieve my goal. I am aware that this is quite early for me asking this but I just want to clear the confusion in my mind regarding the career path I want to go. I have been doing some investigation on this topic and I even asked fellow doctors I knew similar to an ophthalmologist-an optometrist. However, after graduating from high school, I want to know what courses, degrees, and programs I should take to accomplish my dream of being one. My top universities at this point are: McMaster, Waterloo, York, and University of Toronto. My question is :Are these the correct steps to become an ophthalmologist?

1) After four years of high school, apply to a university to get accepted.

2)Major in any of the core courses such as Physics, Biology, Inorganic or Organic Chemistry, English or Mathematics.

3) Study and complete the MCAT. Afterwards, submit it to any chosen medical program to be accepted.

4)Once accepted, medical school requires four years of full time study and leads to a Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) degree.

4) After gaining a general medical education through a M.D. program, prepare to pursue an ophthalmology specialization through a residency program

5)Programs vary, but all ophthalmology residencies are based on the guidelines set by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's (ACGME) Residency Review Committee (RRC). Residents rotate between hospitals and services, completing general surgical and clinical training, as well as sub-specialty experiences. An ophthalmology residency program is considered paid, on-the-job training, which lasts from two to six years.

6) Medical school graduates must then pass the U.S. Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE), in order to become a practicing ophthalmologist.

7) Certification from the American Board of Ophthalmology also requires applicants to pass written and oral exams.

8) To become certified, The Joint Commission on Allied Health Personnel in Ophthalmology (JCAHPO) gives certification exams. Individuals interested in becoming certified must complete three training levels, with a specialty option required for those interested in surgical assisting certification.

Ssome of the points written down I got it from a website: http://study.com/articles/Bachelors_Degrees_for_a_Career_in_Ophthalmology_Program_Overviews.html

I personally think that these are the stages you have to go through to actually become an ophthalmologist but please do correct me if I am wrong and for anyone who has experience of going to any of the universities I have listed that I am interested in, please reply of how the courses and classes are. Thanks!
 

backrow

60% of the time it works everytime
Lifetime Donor
15+ Year Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2005
Messages
1,793
Reaction score
408
You have a good start, but there are several errors

1: go to college, major in whatever you want, but make sure you complete med school requisites.

2: take MCAT during college

3: go to the best medical school you can and get the best grades you can.

4: take USMLE steps 1, 2CK, and 2CS in medical school.

5: participate in "the match" in an attempt to match in ophthalmology. Pray that everyone else born around the same years as you are not as smart as you, didn't do as much research as you, and didn't win the Nobel prize in medicine (ok, maybe don't worry about the Nobel prize part)

6: at the same time as #5 participate in the other version of "the match" to find a place to do your internship

7: graduate medical school, complete one year internship from #6.

8: complete 3 years of residency in ophthalmology from #5.

9: at some point in those 4 years complete USMLE Step 3

10: after residency: Take written qualifying exam and then after passing take the Oral qualifying exam to become Board Certified.

11: do a fellowship of you want to sub specialize.

-the end (and this only applies to the U.S.)
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

SIMRAN2345

New Member
Joined
Nov 9, 2015
Messages
2
Reaction score
0
Thank you so much!!! I really do appreciate you helping me clear the mess in my head about this. This really helped a lot! However, what if you are applying this in Canada? What differences are there?
 
Last edited:

DrZeke

yzarc gniog ylwolS
15+ Year Member
Joined
Apr 25, 2005
Messages
2,698
Reaction score
611
Thank you so much!!! I really do appreciate you helping me clear the mess in my head about this. This really helped a lot! However, what if you are applying this in Canada? What differences are there?

This forum isn't really right place to ask these questions. You are better off asking it in the Canadian medical school application section. Gaining a residency position in ophthalmology is more competitive in Canada than in the USA. Majority of applicants here are in American system. At this time I would focus most on your high school grades getting into a good university. Maybe even considering a med-P program like they have at McGill, if you are already so focused... Good luck.
 
Top