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Things you learned about learning radiology

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I was hoping residents and staff on here could share the things they used or learned that helped them learn radiology or a subfield of it.

Some if the stuff that seems to work well for me:
- studying/reading/watching lectures on a given anatomic area and learning about normal anatomy and pathology in great detail so I get a broad understanding if this region (ex. Shoulder on mri, ultrasound and radiography) and what can go wrong and know these things unfluence what I see on the different modalities. I then look up cases related to these topics on radiopaedia trying to take every case as if it were a live on my PACS workstation, then search my PACS for about 50 old cases dictated by an attending I think knows his/her stuff, so followup or later imaging is available for correlation. Again trying to take the case as one I'd have to dictate and compare to the attending's dictation. After that I start reading live cases and can get more out of reviewing the problematic ones with attendings.
-If you must do fluoro, try to do it as well as possible: you can get a lot more out of them than most seem to think if you read up on the literature and prepare them well ( looking at previous CT's, reading surgery reports etc)
-make some time to quickly review what you've learned at te end if each week: this one hour of quick revision allows stuff to stick MUCH better than just trudging on trying to cram in more new material
-in every book you open look at te images and try to take them as a real live case before reading th caption (modality, pertinent findings, short differential)
 
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Cognovi

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    I was hoping residents and staff on here could share the things they used or learned that helped them learn radiology or a subfield of it.

    Some if the stuff that seems to work well for me:
    - studying/reading/watching lectures on a given anatomic area and learning about normal anatomy and pathology in great detail so I get a broad understanding if this region (ex. Shoulder on mri, ultrasound and radiography) and what can go wrong and know these things unfluence what I see on the different modalities. I then look up cases related to these topics on radiopaedia trying to take every case as if it were a live on my PACS workstation, then search my PACS for about 50 old cases dictated by an attending I think knows his/her stuff, so followup or later imaging is available for correlation. Again trying to take the case as one I'd have to dictate and compare to the attending's dictation. After that I start reading live cases and can get more out of reviewing the problematic ones with attendings.
    -If you must do fluoro, try to do it as well as possible: you can get a lot more out of them than most seem to think if you read up on the literature and prepare them well ( looking at previous CT's, reading surgery reports etc)
    -make some time to quickly review what you've learned at te end if each week: this one hour of quick revision allows stuff to stick MUCH better than just trudging on trying to cram in more new material
    -in every book you open look at te images and try to take them as a real live case before reading th caption (modality, pertinent findings, short differential)

    To simplify/summarize: study, retrieval practice, spaced review, prepare for cases
     
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    To simplify/summarize: study, retrieval practice, spaced review, prepare for cases

    Pretty much, just thought I'd elaborate for any new residents.


    Any tips you would like to add or books you found particularly useful to learn a particular subfield?
     
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